WorldCat Identities

Doran, Peter T.

Overview
Works: 8 works in 22 publications in 1 language and 657 library holdings
Roles: Author, Editor
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Peter T Doran
Life in Antarctic deserts and other cold dry environments : astrobiological analogs by Peter T Doran( )

12 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 642 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The McMurdo Dry Valleys form the largest relatively ice-free area on the Antarctic continent. The perennially ice-covered lakes, ephemeral streams and extensive areas of exposed soil are subject to low temperatures, limited precipitation and salt accumulation. The dry valleys thus represent a region where life approaches its environmental limits. This unique ecosystem has been studied for several decades as an analog to environments on other planets, particularly Mars. For the first time, the detailed terrestrial research of the dry valleys is brought together here, presented from an astrobiological perspective. Chapters include a discussion on the history of research in the valleys, a geological background of the valleys, setting them up as analogs for Mars, followed by chapters on the various sub-environments in the valleys such as lakes, glaciers and soils. Includes concluding chapters on biodiversity and other analog environments on Earth"--Provided by publisher
Advancing clean technologies for exploration of glacial aquatic ecosystems( Book )

2 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Antarctic climate cooling and terrestrial ecosystem response by Peter T Doran( )

3 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Sedimentology and age on profile Lz1023, supplementary data to: Wagner, Bernd; Ortlepp, Sabrina; Kenig, Fabien; Doran, Peter T; Melles, Martin (2010): Palaeoenvironmental implications derived from a piston core from east lobe Bonney, Taylor Valley, Antarctica. Antarctic Science, 22(5), 522-530 by Bernd Wagner( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A 270 cm long sediment sequence was recovered with a piston corer from east lobe Bonney, Taylor Valley, Antarctica, and characterized according to its sedimentological, mineralogical, and geochemical properties. It is the first record of such length recovered from east lobe Bonney. The sediment core is mainly composed of halite crystals of different sizes, water, and a relatively low and stable proportion of clastic particles. Although the sediment surface was probably disturbed by the coring process and absence or low contents of organic material or carbonates hampers the establishment of a robust chronology by radiocarbon dating, the core probably contains at least several hundred years of information about the history of the lake and the Bonney basin. Variations in halite crystal sizes and amount as well as variations in the composition of clastic material can be related to past lake level changes and evaporation cycles
Table I. Radiocarbon dates of the humic acid free fraction (HAF), and the humic acid fraction (HA) from bulk sediment samples of cores Lz1020, Lake Hoare, supplementary data to: Wagner, Bernd; Ortlepp, Sabrina; Doran, Peter T; Kenig, Fabien; Melles, Martin; Burkemper, Andy (2011): The Holocene environmental history of Lake Hoare, Taylor Valley, Antarctica, reconstructed from sediment cores. Antarctic Science, available on CJO, 1-13 by Bernd Wagner( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Up to 2.3 m long sediment sequences were recovered from the deepest part of Lake Hoare in Taylor Valley, southern Victoria Land, Antarctica. Sedimentological, biogeochemical, and mineralogical analyses revealed a high spatial variability of these parameters in Lake Hoare. Five distinct lithological units were recognized. Radiocarbon dating of bulk organic carbon samples from the sediment sequences yielded apparently too old ages and significant age reversals, which prevented the establishment of reliable age-depth models. However, cross correlation of the sedimentary characteristics with those of sediment records from neighbouring Lake Fryxell indicates that the lowermost two units of the Lake Hoare sediment sequences were probably deposited during the final phase of proglacial Lake Washburn, which occupied Taylor Valley during the late Pleistocene and early Holocene. High amounts of angular gravel and the absence of fine-grained material imply a complete desiccation with subaerial conditions in the Lake Hoare basin in the middle of the Holocene. The late Holocene (<c. 3300 calendar yr BP) is characterized by the establishment of environmental conditions similar to those existing today. A late Holocene desiccation event, such as proposed in former studies, is not indicated in the sediment sequences recovered
Life in antarctic deserts and other cold dry environments astrobiological analogues( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Age determination and sedimentology on profile Lz1021, supplementary data to: Wagner, Bernd; Melles, Martin; Doran, Peter T; Kenig, Fabien; Forman, Steven L; Pierau, Roberto; Allen, Phillip (2006): Glacial and postglacial sedimentation in the Fryxell basin, Taylor Valley, southern Victoria Land, Antarctica. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 241, 320-337 by Bernd Wagner( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A 9.14 m long sediment sequence was recovered from Lake Fryxell, Taylor Valley, southern Victoria Land, Antarctica, and investigated for its chronology and sedimentological, mineralogical, and biogeochemical changes. The basal part of the sequence is dominated by coarse clastic matter, i.e., mainly sand. The sediment composition suggests that a lake existed in Fryxell basin during the Middle Weichselian by ca. 48,000 cal. year BP. After a short period of lake-level lowstand ca. 43,000 cal. year BP, lower Taylor Valley became occupied by the proglacial Lake Washburn, which was at least partly supplied by meltwater and sediments from the Ross Ice Sheet that was advanced to the mouth of Taylor Valley. Evaporation of Lake Washburn to lower levels started during the Last Glacial Maximum at ca. 22,000 cal. year BP, long before the Ross Ice Sheet retreated significantly. Lake-level lowering was discontinuous with a series of high and low stands. From ca. 4000 cal. year BP environmental conditions were similar to those of today and lower Fryxell basin was occupied by a small lake. This lake evaporated to a saline or hypersaline pond between ca. 2500 and 1000 cal. year BP and refilled subsequently
 
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Audience level: 0.18 (from 0.16 for Life in An ... to 0.95 for Antarctic ...)

Life in Antarctic deserts and other cold dry environments : astrobiological analogs Life in antarctic deserts and other cold dry environments astrobiological analogues
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Life in antarctic deserts and other cold dry environments astrobiological analogues
Alternative Names
Peter Doran Amerikaans wetenschapper

ピーター・ドラン

彼得·多蘭

Languages
English (22)