WorldCat Identities

Perl, Raphael

Overview
Works: 62 works in 364 publications in 2 languages and 5,526 library holdings
Genres: Legislative materials 
Roles: Author, Editor, Contributor
Classifications: JK1108, 327.41082
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Raphael Perl
The Falkland Islands dispute in international law and politics : a documentary sourcebook by Raphael Perl( Book )

16 editions published in 1983 in English and Multiple languages and held by 525 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

International narcotics control and foreign assistance certification : requirements, procedures, timetables, and guidelines : report by Raphael Perl( Book )

4 editions published in 1988 in English and held by 315 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Terrorism and national security : issues and trends by Raphael Perl( Book )

58 editions published between 2003 and 2006 in English and held by 304 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

International terrorism has long been recognized as a serious foreign and domestic security threat. This issue brief examines international terrorist actions and threats and the U.S. policy response. As the 9/11 Commission report released on July 19, 2004, concludes, the United States needs to use all tools at its disposal, including diplomacy, international cooperation, and constructive engagement to economic sanctions, covert action, physical security enhancement, and military force
Drugs and foreign policy : a critical review by Raphael Perl( Book )

7 editions published between 1994 and 2019 in English and held by 295 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Controlling illegal trafficking in narcotics is a complex challenge. Dilemmas for policymakers abound. Despite new measures adopted by the international community that have led to tactical victories, the flow of illicit drugs into the United States continues largely unabated, and worldwide production of opium, marijuana, and coca continues to grow dramatically. In this timely work, specialists from government, academia, and the private sector debate recent U.S. foreign drug policy--its origins, its elements, its implementation, and its prospects for success. Serious conflicts between U.S. international narcotics policy and U.S. foreign policy contribute to the dilemmas inherent in curbing global drug trafficking: Interdicting drugs interrupts the free flow of goods, people, and wealth across international borders. International political and economic instabilities, especially political breakups and ethnic strife in former police states, complicate U.S. foreign drug policy. Because U.S. antidrug goals can bring political disruption and economic loss to countries where narcotics production is economically and socially entrenched, the United States must cooperate with an international antinarcotics coalition of producer, transit, and consumer nations, operating within the context of their perspectives and priorities while trying to achieve competing U.S. foreign policy goals
Drug control : international policy and approaches by Raphael Perl( Book )

33 editions published between 2003 and 2006 in English and held by 265 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Over the past decade, worldwide production of illicit drugs has risen dramatically: opium and marijuana production has roughly doubled and coca production tripled. Street prices of cocaine and heroin have fallen significantly in the past 20 years, reflecting increased availability. Despite apparent national political resolve to deal with the drug problem, inherent contradictions regularly appear between U.S. anti-drug policy and other national policy goals and concerns. The mix of competing domestic and international pressures and priorities has produced an ongoing series of disputes within and between the legislative and executive branches concerning U.S. international drug policy. One contentious issue has been the Congressionally-mandated certification process, an instrument designed to induce specified drug-exporting countries to prioritize or pay more attention to the fight against narcotics businesses
Drug control : international policy and options by Raphael Perl( Book )

27 editions published between 1988 and 2002 in English and held by 229 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Over the past decade, worldwide production of illicit drugs has risen dramatically: opium and marijuana production has roughly doubled and coca production tripled. Street prices of cocaine and heroin have fallen significantly in the past 20 years, reflecting increased availability. Despite apparent national political resolve to deal with the drug problem, inherent contradictions regularly appear between U.S. anti-drug policy and other national policy goals and concerns. The mix of competing domestic and international pressures and priorities has produced an ongoing series of disputes within and between the legislative and executive branches concerning U.S. international drug policy. One contentious issue has been the Congressionally-mandated certification process, an instrument designed to induce specified drug-exporting countries to prioritize or pay more attention to the fight against narcotics businesses
Terrorism, the future, and U.S. foreign policy by Rensselaer Lee( )

31 editions published between 2001 and 2003 in English and held by 220 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

International terrorism has long been recognized as a foreign and domestic security threat. The tragic events of September 11 in New York, the Washington, D.C., area, and Pennsylvania have dramatically re-energized the nation's focus and resolve on terrorism. This issue brief examines international terrorist actions and threats and the U.S. policy response. Available policy options range from diplomacy, international cooperation, and constructive engagement to economic sanctions, covert action, physical security enhancement, and military force. The September 11th terrorist incidents in the United States, the subsequent anthrax attacks, as well as bombings of the U.S.S. Cole, Oklahoma City, World Trade Center in 1993, and of the U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania in 1998, have brought the issue of terrorism to the forefront of American public interest. Questions relate to whether U.S. policy and organizational mechanisms are adequate to deal with both state-sponsored or -abetted terrorism and that undertaken by independent groups
International regulation of narcotics between the United States and Mexico by Raphael Perl( Book )

3 editions published in 1976 in English and held by 196 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Terrorism, the future, and U.S. foreign policy by Raphael Perl( Book )

19 editions published between 1996 and 2003 in English and held by 186 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

International terrorism has long been recognized as a foreign and domestic security threat. The tragic events of September 11th have dramatically re-energized the nation's focus and resolve on terrorism. This issue brief examines international terrorist actions and threats and the U.S. policy response. Available policy options range from diplomacy, international cooperation, and constructive engagement to economic sanctions, covert action, physical security enhancement, and military force. The recent terrorist incidents in the United States as well as the U.S.S. Cole, 1993 World Trade Center, and U.S. embassy bombings in Africa have brought the issue of terrorism to the forefront of American public interest. Questions relate to whether U.S. policy and organizational mechanisms are adequate to deal with state-sponsored terrorism and that undertaken by independent groups. Terrorist activities supported by sophisticated planning and logistics as well as possible access to CBRN weaponry raise a host of new issues. Faced with such prospects, governments are increasingly likely to consider utilizing covert operations to protect their citizenry. What in the recent past was some analysts' belief that a comprehensive review of U.S. terrorism policy, organizational structure, and preparedness to respond to major terrorist incidents in the United States is needed, has by necessity become a mainstream view. Radical Islamic fundamentalist groups pose a major terrorist threat to U.S. interests and friendly regimes. Nations facing difficult challenges include Algeria, Bahrain, Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Pakistan, and to a lesser degree, Russia and Saudi Arabia. One of the seven states on the State Department's terrorism list, Iran, is seen as the most active state sponsor. Sanctions have not deterred its activity to any meaningful degree. Some see utility in creation of an informal "watch-list" of nations not currently qualifying for inclusion on the terrorism list
Narcotics certification of drug producing and trafficking nations : questions and answers by Raphael Perl( )

5 editions published between 1998 and 2000 in English and held by 170 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Drug trafficking and North Korea : issues for U.S. policy by Raphael Perl( )

15 editions published between 2003 and 2007 in English and held by 155 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

At least 50 documented incidents in more than 20 countries around the world, many involving arrest or detention of North Korean diplomats, link North Korea to drug trafficking. Such events, in the context of credible, but unproven, allegations of large-scale state sponsorship of drug production and trafficking, raise important issues for the United States and its allies in combating international drug trafficking. The challenge to policy makers is how to pursue an effective counter drug policy and comply with U.S. law which may require cutting off aid to North Korea while pursuing other high-priority U.S. foreign policy objectives, including limiting possession and production of weapons of mass destruction; limiting ballistic missile production and export; curbing terrorism, counterfeiting, and international crime; and addressing humanitarian needs. Reports that the Democratic People's Republic of North Korea (DPRK) may be limiting some of its food crop production in favor of drug crop production are particularly disturbing given the country's chronic food shortages. Another issue of rising concern is the degree to which profits from any North Korean drug trafficking, counterfeiting, and other crime-for-profit enterprises may be used to underwrite the costs of maintaining or expanding North Korean nuclear and missile programs. As the DPRK's drug trade becomes increasingly entrenched, and arguably decentralized, analysts question whether the Pyongyang regime would have the ability to effectively restrain such activity, should it so desire. Since 2003, overall seizures of North Korean-linked methamphetamine and heroin are generally down. Some suggest that this decline in seizures being identified as DPRK in origin is because North Korean source methamphetamine is now regularly being mistakenly identified as "Chinese source" given growing links of Chinese criminal elements to North Korea's drug production/trafficking activities
Bosnia war crimes : the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia and U.S. policy by Margaret Mikyung Lee( )

8 editions published between 1996 and 1998 in English and held by 147 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Combating terrorism : the challenge of measuring effectiveness by Raphael Perl( )

13 editions published between 2005 and 2007 in English and held by 142 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report is designed to assist congressional policy makers in understanding and applying broad-based objective criteria when evaluating progress in the nation's efforts to combat terrorism. It is not intended to define specific, in-depth, metrics for measuring progress against terrorism. How one perceives and measures progress is central to formulating and implementing anti-terror strategy. Perception has a major impact, as well, on how nations prioritize and allocate resources. On the flip side, the parameters used to measure progress can set the framework for the measurement of failure. The measurement process is also inextricably linked to strategies. Progress is possible using diverse strategies, under very different approaches. The goals of terrorists and those who combat them are often diametrically opposed, but may also be tangential, with both sides achieving objectives and making progress according to their different measurement systems. Within the context of these competing views and objectives, terrorist activity may be seen as a process that includes discrete, quantum-like changes or jumps that often underscore its asymmetric and nonlinear nature. An approach that looks at continuous metrics such as lower numbers of casualties may indicate success, while at the same time the terrorists may be redirecting resources towards vastly more devastating projects. Policy makers may face considering the pros and cons of reallocating more of the nation's limited resources away from ongoing defensive projects and towards preventing the next quantum jump of terrorism, even if this means accepting losses. Measurement of progress, or lack thereof, may be framed in terms of incidents, attitudes, and trends. A common pitfall of governments seeking to demonstrate success in anti-terrorist measures is overreliance on quantitative indicators, such as the amount of money spent on anti-terror efforts
U.S. anti-terror strategy and the 9/11 Commission report by Raphael Perl( )

7 editions published between 2004 and 2005 in English and held by 141 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

On July 22, 2004 the 9/11 Commission released its final report. The report calls for changes to be made by the executive branch and Congress to more effectively protect the nation in an age of modern terrorism. The report provides 41 concrete recommendations. Generally, the recommendations of the 9/11 Commission as they relate to strategy content and implementation appear consistent with, and supportive of, the National Strategy. Few question the 9/11 Commission Report's overarching premise that U.S. counterterrorism structure, strategy, and implementation can be improved. Some, however, see certain Commission recommendations as incomplete, if not flawed. They suggest that the Commission is often focused on the "last war" and not a future one and that it consciously avoids tackling some of the more complex, yet pressing issues. For example, as its first recommendation, the Commission stresses the need for identifying and prioritizing terrorist sanctuaries, with a focus on failed states. Some assert, however, that terrorists are increasingly returning to their politically stable home countries for sanctuary where they blend into local communities, where their training camps are in civilian housing complexes, and where their bomb factories are in private residences. Although a number of the Commission's recommendations fall within the category of preventing the growth of Islamic extremism, none addresses directly the issue of confronting incitement to terrorism when promoted, countenanced, or facilitated by the action or inaction of nation states. With terrorists able to change targets, tactics, and weapons on short notice, many argue that a successful counterterrorism strategy and institutional structures will need similar flexibility. The degree to which such flexibility will be built into strategy, and into any new institutional structures recommended by the 9/11 Commission, is yet to be determined
Terrorist attack on USS Cole : background and issues for Congress by Raphael Perl( )

4 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 137 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

National Commission on Terrorism report : background and issues for Congress by Raphael Perl( )

4 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 136 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Department of State's Patterns of global terrorism report : trends, state sponsors, and related issues by Raphael Perl( )

7 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 132 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report highlights trends and data found in the State Department's annual Patterns of Global Terrorism report, (Patterns 2003) and addresses selected issues relating to its content
Drug control : international policy and approaches by Rensselaer Lee( )

7 editions published between 2002 and 2005 in English and held by 128 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Over the past decade, worldwide production of illicit drugs has risen dramatically: opium and marijuana production has roughly doubled and coca production tripled. Street prices of cocaine and heroin have fallen significantly in the past 20 years, reflecting increased availability. Despite apparent national political resolve to deal with the drug problem, inherent contradictions regularly appear between U.S. anti-drug policy and other national policy goals and concerns. The mix of competing domestic and international pressures and priorities has produced an ongoing series of disputes within and between the legislative and executive branches concerning U.S. international drug policy. One contentious issue has been the Congressionally-mandated certification process, an instrument designed to induce specified drug-exporting countries to prioritize or pay more attention to the fight against narcotics businesses
North Korea: Terrorism List Removal by Larry A Niksch( )

10 editions published between 2004 and 2008 in English and held by 115 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The issue of North Korea's inclusion on the U.S. list of terrorism-supporting countries has arisen twice in recent U.S.-North Korean diplomacy. In 2000, North Korea demanded that the Clinton Administration remove North Korea from the terrorism-support list before North Korea would send a high-level envoy to Washington and accept the Clinton Administration's proposal to begin negotiations with the United States over the North Korean missile program. In 2003, multilateral negotiations involving six governments began over North Korea's nuclear programs in the wake of North Korea's actions to terminate its obligations under the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and the 1994 U.S.-North Korean Agreed Framework. In the six-party talks, North Korea demanded that in return for a North Korean "freeze" of its plutonium nuclear program, the United States agree to a number of U.S. concessions, including removing North Korea from the U.S. terrorism-support list. On June 26, 2008, President Bush announced that he was officially notifying Congress of his intent to remove North Korea from the list of state sponsors of terrorism after the 45 calender-day notification period to Congress as required by U.S. law. The White House stated that North Korea would thus be removed on August 11, 2008. This announcement was part of the measures the Bush Administration took on June 26 to implement a nuclear agreement that it negotiated with North Korea in September 2007 and finalized details of in April 2008 at a U.S.-North Korean meeting in Singapore. The President also announced that he was immediately lifting sanctions on North Korea under the U.S. Trading with the Enemy Act. North Korea's obligations under this nuclear agreement are to allow the disabling of its plutonium facility at Yongbyon and present to the United States and other governments in the six-party talks a declaration of its nuclear programs. North Korea submitted its declaration on June 26, 2008
International Terrorism: Threat, Policy, and Response by Raphael Perl( )

8 editions published between 2006 and 2007 in English and held by 111 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report examines international terrorist actions, threats, U.S. policies and responses. It reviews the nation's use of tools at its disposal to combat terrorism, from diplomacy, international cooperation, and constructive engagement to physical security enhancement, economic sanctions, covert action, and military force. A modern trend in terrorism appears to be toward loosely organized, self-financed, international networks of terrorists. Increasingly, radical Islamist groups, or groups using religion as a pretext, pose a serious threat to U.S. interests and to friendly regimes. Of concern as well is the growing political participation of extremist Islamist parties in foreign nations. Also noteworthy is the apparent growth of cross-national links among different terrorist organizations, which may involve combinations of military training, funding, technology transfer, or political advice. Looming over the entire issue of international terrorism is the specter of proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD). Iran, seen as the most active state sponsor of terrorism, has been secretly conducting -- and now openly seeks -- uranium enrichment, and North Korea has both admitted to having a clandestine program for uranium enrichment and claimed to have nuclear weapons. Indications have also surfaced that Al Qaeda has attempted to acquire chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear weapons. U.S. policy toward international terrorism contains a significant military component, reflected in U.S. operations in Afghanistan, deployment of U.S. forces elsewhere for specific missions, and, according to the Administration and its supporters, the war in Iraq. Issues of interest to the 110th Congress include whether the Administration is providing sufficient information about the long-term goals and costs of its diverse strategy and whether military force is an optimally effective anti-terrorism instrument when compared with other methods such as intelligence-enhanced law enforcement and pro-active public diplomacy. Increasingly, a wide range of well-funded charitable and publicity activities of radical Islamist groups has led to broadened acceptance of extremist views in target populations. To the extent that nations fail to effectively address this "cold war of ideology," a growing proportion of the world's Moslem youth may grow up embracing extremist views that could ultimately lead to increased terrorism. As terrorism is a global phenomenon, a major challenge facing policymakers is how to maximize international cooperation and support without unduly compromising important U.S. national security interests and options. Other significant policy challenges include: (1) how to minimize the economic and civil liberties costs of an enhanced/tightened security environment, and (2) how to combat incitement to terrorism, especially in instances where such activity is state sponsored or countenanced
 
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