WorldCat Identities

Miller, Richard 1949-

Overview
Works: 33 works in 67 publications in 1 language and 1,860 library holdings
Genres: Bibliographies  Handbooks and manuals  Academic theses  Technical reports 
Roles: Author
Classifications: SD11, 016.63258
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Richard Miller
 
Most widely held works by Richard Miller
Western juniper field guide asking the right questions to select appropriate management actions by Robert F Miller( )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 280 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Strong evidence indicates that western juniper has significantly expanded its range since the late 1800s by encroaching into landscapes once dominated by shrubs and herbaceous vegetation (fig. 1). Woodland expansion affects soil resources, plant community structure and composition, water, nutrient and fire cycles, forage production, wildlife habitat, and biodiversity. Goals of juniper management include an attempt to restore ecosystem function and a more balanced plant community that includes shrubs, grasses, and forbs, and to increase ecosystem resilience to disturbances. Developing a management strategy can be a difficult task due to uncertainty about how vegetation, soils, hydrologic function, and wildlife will respond to treatments."
Age structure and expansion of piñon-juniper woodlands : a regional perspective in the Intermountain West( )

4 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 266 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Numerous studies have documented the expansion of woodlands in the Intermountain West; however, few have compared the chronology of expansion for woodlands across different geographic regions or determined the mix and extent of presettlement stands. We evaluated tree age structure and establishment for six woodlands in four ecological provinces in the central and northern Great Basin. Since 1860, the area occupied by piñon and or juniper has increased 125 to 625 percent. The increase of trees was a result of infill into shrub-steppe communities with relatively open low density stands of trees and expansion of piñon and juniper into sagebrush-steppe communities that previously did not support trees. Woodland expansion in Oregon, Utah, and Nevada were similar, but began two to three decades earlier in Idaho. The majority of woodlands are still in the early to mid phases of stand closure, which means they often support an understory of shrubs and herbaceous vegetation. This has implications for future changes that will occur within these woodlands in the next 30 to 50 years. In the absence of disturbance or management, the majority of these landscapes will become closed woodlands resulting in the loss of understory plant species and greater costs for restoration."
A field guide for rapid assessment of post-wildfire recovery potential in sagebrush and Piñon-Juniper ecosystems in the Great Basin : evaluating resilience to disturbance and resistance to invasive annual grasses and predicting vegetation response by Richard Miller( )

6 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 258 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This field guide provides a framework for rapidly evaluating post-fire resilience to disturbance, or recovery potential, and resistance to invasive annual grasses, and for determining the need and suitability of the burned area for seeding. The framework identifies six primary components that largely determine resilience to disturbance, resistance to invasive grasses, and potential successional pathways following wildfire, as well as the information sources and tools needed to evaluate each component. The components are: (1) characteristics of the ecological site; (2) vegetation composition and structure prior to the wildfire; (3) fire severity; (4) post-wildfire weather; (5) post-wildfire management, especially grazing; and (6) monitoring and adaptive management. The tools provided are: (1) a conceptual model of the key components that largely determine resilience to disturbance and resistance to invasive annual grasses of the burn area, (2) a guide to evaluate post-wildfire severity, (3) indicators to estimate pre-wildfire plant composition and structure if not known, and (4) an evaluation score sheet to rate an areas potential post-wildfire resilience to disturbance, resistance to invasive annual grasses and, thus, the need for seeding and probability of success."
A field guide for selecting the most appropriate treatment in sagebrush and piñon-juniper ecosystems in the Great Basin : evaluating resilience to disturbance and resistance to invasive annual grasses, and predicting vegetation response by Richard Miller( )

14 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 257 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This field guide identifies seven primary components that largely determine resilience to disturbance, as well as resistance to invasive grasses and plant succession following treatment of areas of concern. The primary components are (1) characteristics of the ecological site, (2) current vegetation prior to treatment, (3) disturbance history, (4) type, timing, and severity of the treatment, (5) post-treatment weather, (6) post-treatment management, especially grazing, and (7) monitoring and adaptive management. A series of key questions and a set of tools are provided to assess these primary components. This assessment is designed to allow field personnel to (1) evaluate resilience to disturbance and resistance to invasive annual grass for an area of concern, (2) predict the potential successional pathways, and (3) then select the most appropriate treatment, including the need for seeding. An evaluation score sheet is included for rating resilience to disturbance and resistance to invasive annual grasses and the probability of seeding success."
A review of fire effects on vegetation and soils in the Great Basin Region : response and ecological site characteristics( )

2 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 249 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This review synthesizes the state of knowledge on fire effects on vegetation and soils in semi-arid ecosystems in the Great Basin Region, including the central and northern Great Basin and Range, Columbia River Basin, and the Snake River Plain. We summarize available literature related to: (1) the effects of environmental gradients, ecological site, and vegetation characteristics on resilience to disturbance and resistance to invasive species; (2) the effects of fire on individual plant species and communities, biological soil crusts, seed banks, soil nutrients, and hydrology; and (3) the role of fire severity, fire versus fire surrogate treatments, and post-fire grazing in determining ecosystem response. From this, we identify knowledge gaps and present a framework for predicting plant successional trajectories following wild and prescribed fires and fire surrogate treatments. Possibly the three most important ecological site characteristics that influence a site's resilience (ability of the ecological site to recover from disturbance) and resistance to invasive species are soil temperature/moisture regimes and the composition and structure of vegetation on the ecological site just prior to the disturbance event
Fire patterns in piñon and juniper land cover types in the semiarid western United States from 1984 through 2013 by David I Board( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 215 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Increases in area burned and fire size have been reported across a wide range of forest and shrubland types in the Western United States in recent decades, but little is known about potential changes in fire regimes of piñon and juniper land cover types. We evaluated spatio-temporal patterns of fire in piñon and juniper land cover types from the National Gap Analysis Program using Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity (MTBS 2016) data (1984 through 2013) for Northern and Southern Intermountain and Central and Southern Rocky Mountain geographic regions. We examined differences in total area burned, fire rotation, fire size, fire number, and fire season among: (1) the four geographic regions; (2) the EPA level III ecoregions that occur within each geographic region; and (3) the piñon and juniper land cover types (woodlands, savannas, and shrublands) and other land cover types that occur within each geographic region and level III ecoregion. We found that area burned during the 30-year period, number of fires each year, and fire size followed a strong geographic pattern: Northern Intermountain > Southern Intermountain > Southern Rocky Mountain > Central Rocky Mountain. Area burned within piñon and juniper land cover types increased significantly during the 30-year period across the study area overall and for each geographic region, except the Southern Intermountain. Fire rotations were within reported historical ranges for sagebrush ecosystems and decreased over time. Also, fire number or fire size increased for the Southern Rocky Mountain and Southern Intermountain geographic regions. Across the study area, spatio-temporal patterns in fire regimes for piñon and juniper land cover types were similar to those for other land cover types. Careful monitoring of longer term trends in fire activity and the interacting effects of invasive annual grasses, bark beetles, and climate change is needed to access the dynamics of piñon and juniper land cover types and evaluate the efficacy of management treatments in piñon and juniper land cover types."
The ecology, history, ecohydrology, and management of pinyon and juniper woodlands in the Great Basin and Northern Colorado Plateau of the Western United States by Richard Miller( )

2 editions published in 2019 in English and held by 192 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This synthesis reviews current knowledge of pinyon and juniper ecosystems, in both persistent and newly expanded woodlands, for managers, researchers, and the interested public. We draw from a large volume of research papers to centralize information on these semiarid woodlands. The first section includes a general description of both the Great Basin and northern Colorado Plateau. The ecology section covers woodland and species life histories, biology, and ecology and includes a detailed discussion of climate and the potential consequences of climate change specific to the Great Basin and Colorado Plateau. The history section discusses 20,000 years of woodland dynamics and geographic differences among woodland disturbance regimes and resilience. The ecohydrology section discusses hydrologic processes in woodlands that influence soil conservation and loss; water capture, storage, and release; and the effect that woodland structure and composition have on these processes. The final section, restoration and management, covers the history of woodland management, the different methods used, the advantages and disadvantages of different vegetation treatments, and posttreatment vegetation responses. We also discuss successes and failures and key components that determine project outcomes important for consideration when restoring ecosystem function, integrity, and resilience
Piñon and juniper field guide : asking the right questions to select appropriate management actions by Robin J Tausch( Book )

2 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 26 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Piñon-juniper woodlands are an important vegetation type in the Great Basin. Old-growth and open shrub savanna woodlands have been present over much of the last several hundred years. Strong evidence indicates these woodlands have experienced significant tree infilling and major expansion in their distribution since the late 1800s by encroaching into surrounding landscapes once dominated by shrubs and herbaceous vegetation. Both infilling and expansion affects soil resources, plant community structure and composition, water and nutrient cycles, forage production, wildlife habitat, biodiversity, and fire patterns across the landscape. Another impact is the shift from historic fire regimes to larger and more intense wildfires that are increasingly determining the future of this landscape. This publication helps biologists and land managers consider how to look at expansion of woodlands and determine what questions to ask to develop a management strategy, including prescribed fire or other practices
Summary results for BLM field offices in Nevada from a regional assessment of habitats for species for species of conservation concern by United States( )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 17 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The ecology and management of Bluebunch wheatgrass (Agropyron Spicatum) : a review by Richard Miller( Book )

2 editions published in 1986 in English and held by 14 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Medusahead (Taeniatherum asperum Nevski) : a review and annotated bibliography by Thomas O Hilken( Book )

1 edition published in 1980 in English and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Biology, ecology, and management of western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis)( Book )

2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Managing western juniper for wildldife by Richard Miller( )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Economics of range fertilization in eastern Oregon by Ed Schmisseur( Book )

1 edition published in 1978 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Prescribed fire for eastern Oregon rangelands : management considerations by Ed Schmisseur( Book )

1 edition published in 1985 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Spatial and temporal changes of sage grouse habitat in the sagebrush biome by Richard Miller( Book )

2 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) occur in regions that are spatially diverse and temporally dynamic in western North America. During the past 130 years, significant changes in disturbance regimes have affected their habitat. Plant communities in existence today are unique from any other time period because of altered disturbance regimes, confounded by a continual change in climate. In some portions of their range, sage grouse populations have been reduced or eliminated from loss of habitat through land conversion to agriculture or shifts from perennial shrub grasslands to introduced exotic annual grasslands or pinyon-juniper woodlands. However, in other sections of their range, changes in plant community composition and structure have been minimal. Causes for decline in sage grouse populations in these areas are less and often debated. Spatial and temporal diversity significantly affect the quality of sage grouse habitat. Because of the diversity of biotic and abiotic factors and land use history across the range of sage grouse, plant community structure and composition have responded differently throughout this region. When considering a sagebrush steppe restoration plan or sage grouse habitat management plant, one must take into account landscape heterogeneity, site potential, site condition, and habitat needs of sage grouse during different segments of their life cycle: breeding, nesting, brood rearing, wintering, etc. This paper describes the spatial diversity of sage grouse range, short- and long-term dynamics and disturbance regimes across this ecosystem, and potential management implications related to sage grouse habitat
Economics of spraying big sagebrush communities of eastern Oregon by Ed Schmisseur( Book )

1 edition published in 1980 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Response of five Southwestern range plants to season of defoliation by Richard Miller( )

3 editions published in 1976 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Spraying big sagebrush range in eastern Oregon-- management insights by Ed Schmisseur( Book )

1 edition published in 1981 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Alternative Names
Miller, R. F. (Richard Frank), 1949-

Miller, Richard F., 1949-

Miller, Richard Frank, 1949-

Miller, Richard (Richard Frank), 1949-

Miller, Rick (Richard Frank), 1949-

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Languages
English (51)