WorldCat Identities

佐藤昌一郎 1932-

Overview
Works: 18 works in 29 publications in 2 languages and 69 library holdings
Roles: Author
Classifications: UF545.J3, 355.750952
Publication Timeline
.
Most widely held works by 佐藤昌一郎
Rikugun kōshō no kenkyū by Shōichirō Satō( Book )

4 editions published in 1999 in Japanese and held by 20 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Chihō jichitai to gunji kichi by Shōichirō Satō( Book )

3 editions published in 1981 in Japanese and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Hankaku no jidai : seizon no tame no sentaku by Shōichirō Satō( Book )

3 editions published in 1984 in Japanese and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Kan'ei Yawata Seitetsujo no kenkyū by Shōichirō Satō( Book )

2 editions published in 2003 in Japanese and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Zushi, Miyake kara no messēji by Kiichirō Tomino( Book )

2 editions published in 1989 in Japanese and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Kan'ei yahata seitetsujo no kenkyu( Book )

2 editions published in 2003 in Japanese and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Sekai no hankaku undō( Book )

2 editions published in 1984 in Japanese and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

(Method of use of oxygen bomb calorimeter) by Shōichirō Satō( Book )

1 edition published in 1937 in Japanese and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Edema Extension Distance( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

THrombolysis for Acute Wake-up and unclear-onset Strokes with alteplase at 0·6 mg/kg (THAWS) Trial( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : Rationale: Because of lack of information regarding timing of stroke, patients who suffer stroke during sleep are generally ineligible for intravenous thrombolysis, although many of these patients could potentially recover with this treatment. Magnetic resonance image findings with positive diffusion-weighted imaging and no marked parenchymal hyperintensity on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (negative pattern) can identify acute ischemic stroke patients within 4·5 h from symptom onset. Aims: The THrombolysis for Acute Wake-up and unclear-onset Strokes with alteplase at 0·6 mg/kg trial aims to determine the efficacy and safety of intravenous thrombolysis with alteplase at 0·6 mg/kg body weight, the approved dose for Japanese stroke patients, using magnetic resonance image-based selection in ischemic stroke patients with unclear time of symptom onset, and compare findings with standard treatment. Design: This is an investigator-initiated, multicenter, prospective, randomized, open-treatment, blinded-end-point clinical trial. The design is similar to the Efficacy and Safety of MRI-based Thrombolysis in Wake-up Stroke trial. Patients with unclear-onset time of stroke symptoms beyond 4·5 h and within 12 h after the time of the last-known-well period and within 4·5 h after symptom recognition, who showed a negative fluid-attenuated inversion recovery pattern, are randomized to either intravenous thrombolysis or standard treatment. Study outcomes: The primary efficacy end-point is modified Rankin Scale 0-1 at 90 days. The safety outcome measures are symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage at 22-36 h, and major bleeding and mortality at 90 days. Discussion: This trial may help determine if low-dose alteplase at 0·6 mg/kg should be recommended as a routine clinical strategy for ischemic stroke patients with unclear-onset time
Eiyō shidō yōkō( Book )

1 edition published in 1966 in Japanese and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Trends in oral anticoagulant choice for acute stroke patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation in Japan: The SAMURAI-NVAF Study( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract Background Large clinical trials are lack of data on non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants for acute stroke patients. Aim To evaluate the choice of oral anticoagulants at acute hospital discharge in stroke patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and clarify the underlying characteristics potentially affecting that choice using the multicenter Stroke Acute Management with Urgent Risk-factor Assessment and Improvement-NVAF registry (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01581502). Method The study included 1192 acute ischemic stroke/transient ischemic attack patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (527 women, 77·7 ± 9·9 years old) between September 2011 and March 2014, during which three nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant oral anticoagulants were approved for clinical use. Oral anticoagulant choice at hospital discharge (median 23-day stay) was assessed. Results Warfarin was chosen for 650 patients, dabigatran for 203, rivaroxaban for 238, and apixaban for 25. Over the three 10-month observation periods, patients taking warfarin gradually decreased to 46·5% and those taking nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants increased to 48·0%. As compared with warfarin users, patients taking nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants included more men, were younger, more frequently had small infarcts, and had lower scores for poststroke CHADS2, CHA2DS2-VASc, and HAS-BLED, admission National Institutes of Health stroke scale, and discharge modified Rankin Scale. Nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants were started at a median of four-days after stroke onset without early intracranial hemorrhage. Patients starting nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants earlier had smaller infarcts and lower scores for the admission National Institutes of Health stroke scale and the discharge modified Rankin Scale than those starting later. Choice of nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants was independently associated with 20-day or shorter hospitalization (OR 2·46, 95% CI 1·87-3·24). Conclusions Warfarin use at acute hospital discharge was still common in the initial years after approval of nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants, although nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant users increased gradually. The index stroke was milder and ischemia-risk indices were lower in nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant users than in warfarin users. Early initiation of nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants seemed safe
Three-month risk-benefit profile of anticoagulation after stroke with atrial fibrillation: The SAMURAI-Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation (NVAF) study( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Aims This study was performed to determine the short-term risk-benefit profiles of patients treated with oral anticoagulation for acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack using a multicenter, prospective registry. Methods A total of 1137 patients (645 men, 77 ± 10 years old) with acute ischemic stroke/transient ischemic attack taking warfarin (662 patients) or non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (dabigatran in 205, rivaroxaban in 245, apixaban in 25 patients) for nonvalvular atrial fibrillation who completed a three-month follow-up survey were studied. Choice of anticoagulants was not randomized. Primary outcome measures were stroke/systemic embolism and major bleeding. Results Both warfarin and non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants were initiated within four days after stroke/transient ischemic attack onset in the majority of cases. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant users had lower ischemia- and bleeding-risk indices (CHADS2, CHA2DS2-VASc, HAS-BLED) and milder strokes than warfarin users. The three-month cumulative rate of stroke/systemic embolism was 3.06% (95% CI 1.96%–4.74%) in warfarin users and 2.84% (1.65%–4.83%) in non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant users (adjusted HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.44–2.04). The rate of major bleeding was 2.61% (1.60%–4.22%) and 1.11% (0.14%–1.08%), respectively (HR 0.63, 0.19–1.78); that for intracranial hemorrhage was marginally significantly lower in non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant users (HR 0.17, 0.01–1.15). Major bleeding did not occur in non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant users with a CHADS2 score <4 or those with a discharge modified Rankin Scale score ≤2. Conclusions Stroke or systemic embolism during the initial three-month anticoagulation period after stroke/transient ischemic attack was not frequent as compared to previous findings regardless of warfarin or non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants were used. Intracranial hemorrhage was relatively uncommon in non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant users, although treatment assignment was not randomized. Early initiation of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants during the acute stage of stroke/transient ischemic attack in real-world clinical settings seems safe in bleeding-susceptible Japanese population
Taiheiyō chiseigaku by Karl Haushofer( Book )

1 edition published in 1942 in Japanese and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Za san nebā settsu( Book )

1 edition published in 1994 in Japanese and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Stroke doctors: Who are we? A World Stroke Organization survey( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Background Specialist training provides skilled workforce for service delivery. Stroke medicine has evolved rapidly in the past years. No prior information exists on background or training of stroke doctors globally. Aims To describe the specialties that represent stroke doctors, their training requirements, and the scientific organizations ensuring continuous medical education. Methods The World Stroke Organization conducted an expert survey between June and November 2014 using e-mailed questionnaires. All Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development countries with >1 million population and other countries with >50 million population were included (n = 49, total 5.6 billion inhabitants, 85% of global strokes). Two stroke experts from each selected country were surveyed, discrepancies resolved, and further information on identified stroke-specific curricula sought. Results We received responses from 48 (98%) countries. Of ischemic stroke patients, 64% were reportedly treated by neurologists, ranging from 5% in Ireland to 95% in the Netherlands. Per thousand annual strokes there were average six neurologists, ranging from 0.3 in Ethiopia to 33 in Israel. Of intracerebral hemorrhage patients, 29% were reportedly treated by neurosurgeons, ranging from 5% in Sweden to 79% in Japan, with three neurosurgeons per thousand strokes, ranging from 0.1 in Ethiopia to 24 in South Korea. Most countries had a stroke society (86%) while only 10 (21%) had a degree or subspecialty for stroke medicine. Conclusions Stroke doctor numbers, background specialties, and opportunities to specialize in stroke vary across the globe. Most countries have a scientific society to pursue advancement of stroke medicine, but few have stroke curricula
Rikugun Kōshō no rekishi( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in Japanese and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Rikugun kōshō no kenkyū by Shōichirō Satō( Book )

1 edition published in 1999 in Japanese and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.86 (from 0.82 for Taiheiyō ... to 1.00 for Rikugun ko ...)

Alternative Names
Satō, Shōichirō

Sato, Shoichiro 1932-2002

Satō, Syōitirō

Сато, Сёитиро

サトウ, ショウイチロウ

サトウ, ショウイチロウ 1932-2002

佐藤, 昌一郎

佐藤昌一郎

佐藤昌一郎 1932-

Languages