WorldCat Identities

Cogger, Craig George 1950-

Overview
Works: 59 works in 86 publications in 1 language and 326 library holdings
Genres: Academic theses 
Roles: Author
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Craig George Cogger
General guidelines for subsurface treatment of wastewater by Craig George Cogger( Book )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 29 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Design and installation of low-pressure pipe waste treatment systems( Book )

3 editions published in 1982 in English and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Home gardener's guide to soils and fertilizers by Craig George Cogger( )

3 editions published between 2005 and 2020 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Soil is a mixture of weathered rock fragments and organic matter at the earth's surface. It is biologically active--a home to countless microorganisms, invertebrates, and plant roots. It varies in depth from a few inches to five feet or more. Native soil is roughly 50 percent pore space. This space forms a complex network of pores of varying sizes, much like those in a sponge. Soil provides nutrients, water, and physical support for plants as well as oxygen for plant roots. Soil organisms are nature's primary recyclers, turning dead cells and tissue into nutrients, energy, carbon dioxide, and water to fuel new life
Backyard composting by Craig George Cogger( )

3 editions published between 2001 and 2017 in English and held by 14 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Gardeners have long made and used compost because of the way it improves garden soil. Home composting transforms yard debris and food scraps into a valuable soil amendment and closes the recycling loop in our own backyards (Figure 1). Today, many cities have municipal composting programs. These programs include curbside yard and food debris collection, large-scale composting at commercial facilities, and resale of the finished compost to gardeners and landscapers. Nonetheless, backyard composting remains popular in areas without municipal programs, and for gardeners who want to make and use their own compost
Design and installation of mound systems for waste treatment( Book )

1 edition published in 1982 in English and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Biosolids management guidelines for Washington State( Book )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Cover crops for home gardens east of the Cascades by Craig George Cogger( )

4 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Worksheet for calculating biosolids application rates in agriculture by Craig George Cogger( )

4 editions published between 2007 and 2021 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Biosolids are a byproduct of municipal wastewater treatment. Raw sewage solids must be processed to meet U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standards before they can be called biosolids. This worksheet provides step-by-step instructions for calculating an application rate of municipal biosolids, based on satisfying crop nitrogen need
Growing food on parking strips and in front yard gardens by Craig George Cogger( )

3 editions published between 2013 and 2019 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Parking strip and front yard vegetable gardens are increasingly popular in urban neighborhoods in Washington State. These locations may be the sunniest spots in the yard, and they offer an opportunity to expand garden space on small lots. These gardens not only provide fresh produce, but they can also be a source of neighborhood pride, bringing beauty to an urban streetscape and introducing neighbors to gardening and home-grown food. When planting a parking strip or front yard garden, you need to assess the site and investigate any local ordinances that may affect it. You will also need to determine soil quality and environmental impacts, particularly on water quality, as well as safety concerns, such as food and traffic safety
Organic soil amendments in yards and gardens : how much is enough? by Craig George Cogger( )

2 editions published between 2013 and 2019 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Organic soil amendments can benefit most garden soils, however, applying too much can waste money, increase the risk of harming water quality, and even harm plants. This fact sheet describes the benefits of using organic soil amendments, the characteristics of the various types available, and most importantly, how much to apply in home gardens and landscapes."--Abstract
Worksheet for calculating biosolids application rates in agriculture by Craig George Cogger( Book )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Pressure dosed septic systems : electrical components and maintenance by Claude H House( Book )

1 edition published in 1985 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Using biosolids in gardens and landscapes by Craig George Cogger( )

2 editions published between 2014 and 2019 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Closing the recycling loop means turning waste materials into useful products. We close the recycling loop in our gardens and landscapes when we use compost made from yard debris and food waste, and organic fertilizers made from fish or poultry waste, or biosolids products. Most recycled organic waste materials are composted, dried, heated, pelletized, or otherwise treated to make them safe and convenient for use as soil amendments
Basic principles of onsite sewage( )

2 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Cover crops for home gardens in western Washington and Oregon by Craig George Cogger( Book )

1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Soil community structure : effect of different organic agroecosystems and edaphic properties by Doug Collins( Book )

3 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Because of their agronomic importance and sensitivity to management changes soil organisms are potentially robust indicators of soil quality. This study examined the sensitivity of decomposer, nematode, and collembolan communities to different organic management practices and to chemical and physical edaphic properties. Two study sites were used: the Long-term Organic Farming Systems Research and Demonstration Site, Puyallup, WA and Full Circle Farm, Carnation, WA. The experiment at Puyallup is designed to compare cropping system, amendment type, and tillage mechanism. Amendment with C:N of 11:1 increased bacterial-feeding nematodes without decreasing omnivorous/predacious nematodes compared to amendment with C:N of 15:1. Including a one-year pasture in rotation reduced bacterial-feeding nematodes, increased nematode maturity index and fungal dominance and increased Collembola by a factor 3.4-4.5. However, after cultivation, none of these changes to the soil community persisted. At Full Circle Farm we evaluated farm-scale and field-scale variation of soil communities and their relation to edaphic properties. Regression trees with chemical, physical, and management parameters explained more than 60% farm-scale variation in microbial biomass, N-mineralization potential, and nematode abundance, but were less effective at modeling collembolan abundance, and nematode structure and enrichment indices. Field-scale spatial analyses indicated nematodes, bacterial to fungal biomass ratio, and collembolans were autocorrelated in the sandier, but not in the clay-rich field. Microbial biomass was autocorrelated in the clay-rich field. We conclude soil physical and chemical properties can have significant, but inconsistent effects on biological variation, and mapping inherent soil quality parameters should precede monitoring soil communities. We also evaluated selective inhibition of substrate-induced respiration (SIR), for determining the ratio of fungal to bacterial biomass in a replicated field study. We optimized inhibitor concentrations using soil from one plot of the Puyallup experiment by evaluating the percent inhibition and inhibition additivity ratio (IAR). When optimized concentrations of cycloheximide (fungal inhibitor) and streptomycin (bacterial inhibitor) were applied to soils from 17 other plots, significant inhibitor overlap was recorded. We conclude that using selective inhibition of SIR to identify treatment effects in a replicated field experiment requires optimization for antibiotic level be completed for each plot, making it too cumbersome for routine use
The field book for dairy manure applicators : date, rate, and place by Dan M Sullivan( Book )

1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Environmental ethics : a challenge for western culture by Craig George Cogger( Book )

3 editions published between 1994 and 1997 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Recycling municipal wastewater sludge in Washington by Craig George Cogger( Book )

1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Soil management for small farms by Craig George Cogger( Book )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Audience Level
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Audience Level
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  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.58 (from 0.46 for Using bios ... to 0.68 for Pressure d ...)

Alternative Names
Cogger, C. G. (Craig George), 1950-

Cogger, Craig, 1950-

Cogger, Craig G., 1950-

Languages
English (42)