WorldCat Identities

Coulson, John E.

Overview
Works: 56 works in 104 publications in 1 language and 670 library holdings
Genres: Conference papers and proceedings 
Roles: Editor, Author
Classifications: LB1029.A85, 371.3944
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by John E Coulson
Programmed learning and computer-based instruction; proceedings by Conference on Application of Digital Computers to Automated Instruction( Book )

3 editions published in 1962 in English and held by 370 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Evaluation of the special services for disadvantaged students (SSDS) program : final report by John E Coulson( Book )

5 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 60 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The results of a 1983 followup survey to assess the long-term impact of the federally-funded Special Services for Disadvantaged Students (ssds) program are presented. Educationally or economically disadvantaged students who enrolled in the program during their freshman year, 1979-1980, were studied. Questionnaires investigated respondents' educational experiences since their freshman year (periods of enrollment, institutions attended, amounts and types of special services received, and financial assistance received). The kinds of jobs that respondents hoped to have in 5 years were also identified. Student transcripts were examined for information on the number of school terms completed by students, the number of course units attempted and completed, and the students' grade point average. Relationships among freshman-year services, post-freshman services, and student outcomes were also determined: (1) The freshman's moderate use of services (I.E., a single type of service or two types of services) was associated with better outcomes, such as more extended enrollment, and with a greater number of course units attempted and completed; (2) Intensive academic services in the freshman year were not associated with better outcomes; (3) Non-academic services, on the other hand, are associated with better outcomes, including higher grades; and (4) Academic services received after the freshman year are associated with poorer long-term academic outcomes. Information is included on the background and goals of the ssds program and the design and major findings of a previous base-line study. The study questionnaire is appended. (Sw)
Programmed learning and computer-based instruction : proceedings of the Conference on Application of Digital Computers to Automated Instruction, October 10-12, 1961 by John E Coulson( Book )

15 editions published between 1961 and 1962 in English and held by 47 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Non-program variables in the application of programmed instruction; final report by John E Coulson( Book )

4 editions published in 1965 in English and held by 44 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Two experiments were conducted to analyze the specific external factors that contribute most significantly to student learning. The three hypotheses tested were--(1) learning is increased when an experimenter actively augments the program by rephrasing program statements and by branching the student to different parts of the program when the student has difficulty with a particular topic, (2) learning is increased when the experimenter has access to detailed displays of current post student performance, designed to assist him in diagnosing student-learning problems, and (3) learning is increased by allowing the student to branch voluntarily in the program at any time during the instruction. The three nonprogram variables used were (1) experimenter augmentation, (2) diagnostic information, and (3) student control. Two experiments were carried out. In the first experiment, 53 randomly selected students received 6 experimental treatments. Each subject was directed to appropriate pages in his program by a digital display on his response device. He responded to multiple choice items by pressing a button. Feedback was given by a red/green light arrangement. The computer retained information on the subject's performance. The second experiment studied the nonprogram variables with 104 subjects in 4 high school classrooms, with 4 teachers serving as experimenters. Subjects with a passive experimenter and additional materials were (1) told to use the materials as they saw fit, and (2) given the program booklet. Subjects with an active experimenter were given only the program booklet for use in the classroom. The study did not find that program effectiveness was determined by variables not directly under program control as suggested by the hypotheses subjected to test. (Hb)
Use of exploratory research and individual tutoring techniques for the development of programming methods and theory; final report by Harry F Silberman( Book )

2 editions published in 1964 in English and held by 34 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The detection of separations between adjacent signals on a simulated ppi radar scope by Robert M Herrick( )

2 editions published in 1955 in English and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A simulated Plan Position Indicator (PPI) scope was used to evaluate the effects of a number of visual variables upon the minumum signal luminance increment required for the detection of a separation between two identical signals. The signal luminance increment is the difference between the signal luminance and the scope face luminance. All of the variables, viz., background luminance, distance between signals, scan rate, and simulated phosphorescence decay were of importance in determining threshold log values. Differences in threshold log mong the observers were also statistically significant. Moreover, most of the interactions among the variables were statistically significant
Programmed learning and computer-based instructions proceedings by D.C. 1961 Conference on Application of Digital Computers to Automated Insturctions. Washington( Book )

1 edition published in 1962 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Systems analysis in education by John E Coulson( Book )

3 editions published in 1965 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The paper is concerned with systems analysis in education, which certainly includes some highly complex man-machine systems. To make these words more than a catch phrase, the systems analysis process is described in fairly concrete terms, giving specific examples of the procedures and products of such analyses. The conclusion of the paper, some possible implications of systems analysis procedures for educational data banks are discussed
An instructional management system for the public schools by John E Coulson( Book )

5 editions published in 1967 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An Instructional Management System is described as an interim approach toward widespread adoption of computer-based instruction. An experimental prototype of the Instructional Management System is being developed by System Development Corporation under a contract from the Southwest Regional Laboratory for Educational Research and Development. It is a computer-based information system designed to aid school personnel in the individual monitoring and management of student progress. Inputs to the Instructional Management System include the result of diagnostic tests, and information about the pupils and the instructional resource materials. Machine-prepared outputs show individual and group performance on the diagnostic tests, and suggest alternative instructional materials or teaching techniques that the teacher might use for pupils with specific weaknesses. (Author)
Results of Initial Experiment in Automated Teaching by John E Coulson( Book )

3 editions published in 1959 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Eight groups of ten junior college students were given an experimental training session with manually simulated teaching machines, each group being taught with a different mode of teaching machine operation. The variables were student response mode, size of steps between successive items, and branching procedure. A written test was given to all students after the training session, and again three weeks later. The same test was given to a control group which had no training with the teaching machines. The use of the simulated teaching machines led to a significant degree of learning by the subjects. Multiple choice and branching procedures required less time but did not affect test scores significantly. Small item steps required significantly more training time, but also yielded significantly higher test scores. Significant interaction between the mode of response and branching variables resulted from a high mean criterion score obtained by the constructed response--non-branching group. Statistical tables supplement the report. [Not available in hard copy due to marginal legibility of original document.] (Jy)
Computers in programed instruction and educational data processing by John E Coulson( Book )

3 editions published in 1963 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Overview of the National Evaluation of the Emergency School Aid Act by John E Coulson( Book )

2 editions published in 1977 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An overall evaluation of the Basic and Pilot Grants Programs, two closely related programs authorized under the Emergency School Aid Act (esaa), and an in-depth study designed to identify specific program approaches associated with project success were conducted. Data were collected over a period of three school years: 1973-74, 1974-75, and 1975-76. The overall evaluation involved national samples of schools with Basic and Pilot projects; and the in-depth study involved a subset of those projects. For the overall evaluation, comparable student, program, and outcome data in both ESAA-funded and non-ESAA schools were collected along with data on district, school, and program characteristics, student achievement, and background characteristics of students and school personnel. The in-depth study, conducted during the second and third years of the overall evaluation, involved intensive classroom observations and staff interviews. This report provides an overview of the evaluation design and results for all three years, emphasizing the similarities and differences in the findings across years. Findings included: all three years, dollars were targeted toward needy school districts, schools, and students, and translated into services directed toward students with needs for such services; strength of administrative leadership was a major factor in the schools' ability to improve student achievement; in general, achievement gains tended to be larger in schools with greater resource availability and utilization. (Nq)
Effects of different head start program approaches on children of different characteristics : report on analysis of data from 1968-1969 national evaluation by System Development Corporation( Book )

2 editions published between 1972 and 1973 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An In-depth study of emergency school aid act (ESAA) schools by System Development Corporation( Book )

1 edition published in 1976 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Third Year of Emergency School Aid Act (Esaa) Implementation by John E Coulson( Book )

2 editions published in 1977 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The report summarizes the results of a national evaluation of the Emergency School Aid Act (esaa) Basic and Pilot programs during their third year of operation, 1975-76. It also provides longitudinal data on the achievement of students participating all three years, 1973-74 through 1975-76. Examined were the needs of esaa students and schools, school expenditures and their relationship to the students' academic needs, esaa program impact on student achievement, and the relationship between student achievement and certain program characteristics and approaches. Data indicated that: sample students in Pilot and Basic schools showed clear evidence of need for compensatory education programs in reading and mathematics; in general, minority students, whether in minority-isolated or desegregated schools, showed a greater need for compensatory education services than did non-minority students; more than half the total supplemental funds in all three evaluation samples were spent for basic skills instruction; recipient districts and schools translated their esaa funds into services appropriate for their students, and focused those services most heavily on the students with the greatest academic needs; there was a positive relationship between students' reading achievement and the extent of school activities designed to promote a favorable interracial climate in the Basic Secondary sample, while there was a negative relationship between such activities and student achievement in the Basic Elementary sample. (Nq)
National Evaluation of the Emergency School Aid Act (ESAA) Summary of the Second-Year Studies by John E Coulson( Book )

2 editions published in 1976 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This document summarizes in non-technical terms the preliminary policy-relevant findings of a national evaluation of the Emergency School Aid Act (ESAA) Basic and Pilot Programs during the second year of program operations, 1974-75. An attempt is also made to relate the second year results to findings in the first evaluation year, 1973-74. A major objective of the study has been to assess the overall impact of the ESAA Basic and Pilot programs on students' academic skills and on certain desegregation-related outcome measures. Accordingly, results of the impact analyses are reported here. However, it has been apparent from the earliest stages of data collection that the results of any such overall impact study would almost certainly be difficult to interpret because of the wide variations found among local ESAA projects with respect to specific project goals, approaches taken to reach these goals, and the magnitude and quality of project resources applied to the goals. In such an evaluation, the deficiencies of some projects may obscure the successes of other projects. Accordingly, this report places considerable emphasis on the identification of elements of characteristics of the school programs that seem to have helped disadvantaged students, regardless of the source of funding for those programs. (Author/RC)
AUTOMATION, CYBERNETICS, AND EDUCATION by John E Coulson( Book )

3 editions published in 1965 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper presents an overview of recent developments in automation, cybernetics, and data-processing technology that have direct relevance for the future of education. The discussion focuses on the use of computers to provide individualized instruction, but consideration is also given to the application of data-processing equipment to process fiscal accounts and administrative records, to provide automated analysis and assessment of student cumulative records, and to assist in administrative planning. Research at SDC is used to illustrate these developments and their relevance to education. (Author)
The Second Year of Emergency School Aid Act (Esaa) Implementation by John E Coulson( Book )

2 editions published in 1976 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report summarizes the results of an evaluation of the Emergency School Aid Act (esaa) Basic and Pilot Programs during their second year of program operations, 1974-75. Also presented are achievement data for a longitudinal sample of students participating in the first two years of esaa operations, 1973-74 and 1974-75. Although two yeary of evaluation results indicate that the esaa resource allocation process was successful in targeting esaa funds to needy school districts, schools, and students, there was little evidence that those funds had a positive impact on student achievement or school climate. There was some suggestion in the data that schools similar to ESAA-funded schools (I.E., control schools) may have employed other sources of funds (federal or state) to provide ESAA-like services to their students, making the achievement and climate comparisons between the ESAA-funded and non-ESAA-funded schools difficult to interpret. When these two sets of schools are combined for analysis purposes, policy-relevant relationships emerge with regard to particular school activities and associated school climate and achievement gains. Should the relationships found in this study be cross-validated by year three data, clear guidance for esaa program improvement will be forthcoming. (Rc)
Problems and Approaches in Education Program Evaluation by John E Coulson( Book )

1 edition published in 1976 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Although dealing broadly with issues involving program evaluation, this paper is especially concerned with large-scale evaluations of federally funded education programs that are national in scope and, to some extent at least, compensatory in nature. The paper concentrates on a few basic problem areas that seem inherent in the concept of evaluation. They include, for example, problems in defining treatment and outcome variables that will yield useful evaluation results, and difficulties in establishing comparative benchmarks against which program outcomes should be gauged. The paper concludes with a discussion of the role of evaluation vis-a-vis education research, and suggests a strategy by which future evaluations might make a greater contribution to an understanding of important underlying relationships in the teaching-learning process. To illustrate both problems and approaches in evaluation, examples are given from two large studies currently being conducted by System Development Corporation for the U.S. Office of Education: an evaluation of the Emergency School Aid Act (esaa) and a multiyear evaluation of the sustaining effects of compensatory education. (Rc)
Effects of Three Variables in a Teaching Machine by John E Coulson( Book )

1 edition published in 1959 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A teaching machine presents a series of problem materials to a student, requires an overt behavioral response, and provides results of the behavior immediately following the response. There were eight groups of 10 junior college students who were experimentally trained with manually controlled teaching machines, each group was taught with a different mode of teaching machine operation. The three independent variables were student response mode, size of steps between successive items, and sequencing (branching) procedure. A written criterion test was given to the experimental groups immediately after the training sessions and again 3 weeks later. The same criterion test was given to a control group who came from the same school classes as the experimental groups but who had no training on the concepts taught to the experimental groups. Dependent variables were the required teaching machine training time and scores on the criterion test. Scores on a pretest were used as a control variable. Results were that the use of the machine led to significant learning by the experimental groups, the multiple-choice response mode took less time than the constructed response mode, small items required more training time, but yielded higher test scores, and branching conditions required less training than nonbranching, but were not obtained on the total criterion test among experimental groups. Tables delineated the different test scores. This article was published in the "journal of educational psychology," volume 51, number 3, 1960
 
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English (62)