WorldCat Identities

Beaumont, George Howland Sir 1753-1827

Overview
Works: 374 works in 430 publications in 1 language and 3,642 library holdings
Genres: Poetry  Manuscripts  History  Records and correspondence  Portraits  Exhibition catalogs  Pictorial works  Art  Criticism, interpretation, etc  Parodies, imitations, etc 
Roles: Author, Illustrator, Other
Classifications: PR5868.A2, 821.7
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about George Howland Beaumont
 
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Most widely held works by George Howland Beaumont
Memorials of Coleorton; being letters from Coleridge, Wordsworth and his sister, Southey, and Sir Walter Scott to Sir George and Lady Beaumont of Coleorton, Leicestershire, 1803-1834 by William Angus Knight( Book )

13 editions published between 1887 and 1972 in English and held by 268 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This book reprints a selection of Wordsworth's letters and includes correspondence from people close to him—Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Dorothy Wordsworth, among others
The miscellaneous poems of William Wordsworth by William Wordsworth( Book )

4 editions published in 1820 in English and held by 120 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The white doe of Rylstone, or, The fate of the Nortons by William Wordsworth( Book )

1 edition published in 1815 in English and held by 95 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Inspired by Spenser's€Faerie Queene, €this book contains Wordsworth's€The White Doe of Rylstone. The book was first published in 1815
Peter Bell : a tale in verse by William Wordsworth( Book )

3 editions published in 1819 in English and held by 92 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Sir George Beaumont of Coleorton, Leicestershire; " ... a painter's eye, a poet's heart" by Leicester Museums and Art Gallery( Book )

4 editions published in 1973 in English and held by 42 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A pencil sketch of Samuel Johnson by O M Brack( Book )

4 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 27 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Sir George Beaumont and his circle by Leicester Museums and Art Gallery( Book )

1 edition published in 1953 in English and held by 16 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Etchings from the works of Ric. Wilson : with some memoirs of his life, etc by Thomas Hastings( Book )

2 editions published in 1825 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Regency patron : Sir George Beaumont by Margaret Greaves( Book )

2 editions published in 1966 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Poems : Including Lyrical Ballads, And The Miscellaneous Pieces Of The Author : With Aditional Poems, A New Preface And A Supplementary Essay : In Two Volumes by William Wordsworth( Book )

1 edition published in 1815 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Sir George Beaumont, artist and patron by George Howland Beaumont( Book )

2 editions published in 1969 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An exhibition of paintings and drawings by Sir George Beaumont, seventh baronet, 1753-1827 : Leicester Art Gallery, June 29th to August 7th, 1938 by Leicester Museums and Art Gallery( Book )

1 edition published in 1938 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Letter from Uvedale Price, Foxley, to Sir George Beaumont, 1822 January 12 : by Uvedale Price( )

1 edition published in 1822 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Explaining how he had come to hear that the Beaumonts had arrived safely in Rome and how he lost no time in beginning this letter once he knew that they were in good health and settled; describing a serious accident that befell Richard Payne Knight while he was cutting tree boughs and its consequences: "his head swelled to an enormous size, & for one whole night he was delirious from the pain: then came on so great a discharge, that it was feared his strength must be exhausted, & a mortification come on: but he is a man of iron, & the strength of his constitution has gone through it all"; saying that Knight has completely recovered his strength and his appetite; giving as proof the information that Knight now walks five or six miles a day and "a few days before, he had eat a whole goose all but the drum-sticks, without being sick or sorry. This is a pretty stout meal for a convalescent; but less surprising to us, who remember how he used to lade down his throat half a tureen of Macaroni, devour good part of a turbot or stewed lamprey, then dig down to the Pope's eye of a leg of mutton slice after slice, & fill up chinks with game, puddings, &ca &ca"; mentioning that Lady Dacre has printed two volumes of her poetry and distributed them to her friends; saying that she sent one copy to the wife of a friend and Price borrowed, read and admired it; describing the contents of the volumes and mentioning that the collection contains translations of Petrarch, "which were very much liked by Ugo Foscolo, who, till he saw them, thought it impossible that any idea could be given of the original in a translation"; saying how much he wishes he were in Rome with the Beaumonts; telling the story of how he acquired a number of drawings by Salvatore Rosa in Perugia in 1768, guided by Gavin Hamilton; saying that he went to a house in Perugia where Rosa had often lodged and was shown a room full of drawings, all but one of which he purchased; suggesting that Sir George attempt to acquire the last drawing; arguing based on letters by Rosa that the drawings were made in 1665; quoting a passage from Rosa's letter and signing himself "amico vero."
Watercolours and drawings by Sir George Beaumont, 1753-1827 : Bradford City Art Gallery, July 29-August 27, 1961 by George Howland Beaumont( Book )

1 edition published in 1961 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Letter from William Wordsworth, Grasmere, to Sir George Beaumont, 1806 August 21 : by William Wordsworth( )

1 edition published in 1806 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Celebrating the return of Coleridge to England and "His recovery from a most dangerous illness...;" adding that Coleridge is staying with Charles Lamb in London and does not say when they should expect him; thanking him for his prompt reply to his letter and explaining, in detail, why he did not wish to accept financial help from Lord Lowther for the purchase of property; saying "It is my opinion that a man of Letters (and indeed all public men of every pursuit) ought to be severely frugal; if I ought to be frugal of my own money much more ought I to be so of another' person's, particularly of a generous minded person...Had indeed the object been very important, such as putting me in possession of a place, where I had long lived, and with which I had connected many interesting feelings, I might not have thought that any sense of honour or independence, however nice, ought to call upon me to shrink from such an act of kindness and munificence. But this was not the case here; the spot had little to recommend it to me but its own beauty and Providence has dealt so kindly with this country that this is little distinction;" hoping that Applethwaite will remain in his family for generations; saying "My object is not to build a new house, only to add two rooms to an old one, and this on the supposition that we do not go southward with Coleridge;" saying he wrote to Lord Lowther to thank him for the offer of a loan and told Wilkinson [his agent] that he should not have accepted Lord Lowther's offer on his behalf; expressing his sympathy on the death of his friend and adding that he likes the idea of Sir George "republishing your ancestor's poems, and promise myself great pleasure in reading them. If I could be of any service in editing the book, nothing would give me more satisfaction, either in the way of prefixing a Life, carrying the work through the press, or anything else;" concluding that once he sees Coleridge he will be able to be more definitive about their plans for coming to Coleorton
Letter from David Wilkie, London, to Sir George Beaumont, 1811 March 4 : by David Wilkie( )

1 edition published in 1811 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Concerning a painting by Sir George that has just arrived safely in London and to which Wilkie will make some changes; saying "What you have proposed in your letter about showing the night cap only and without the bag will be an improvement, and as I happen to have a night cap here of the same sort with what you got me at Dunmow I shall be able to do it without difficulty;" saying they will all be glad to see him in London on the 20th; adding that he saw Joanna Baillie and told her that "...I supposed you would bring a picture to town for her which she seemed very much pleased to hear;" asking to be remembered to Lady Beaumont
Letter from Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Keswick, to Sir George and Lady Beaumont by Samuel Taylor Coleridge( )

1 edition published in 1803 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Saying to George and Lady Beaumont that he arrived an hour and a half after their departure with Hartley and Derwent & with Wordsworth, his wife, sister, and the baby; stating that Mrs. Wordsworth became sick on that Wednesday from packing for the journey, and that he was also feeling unwell and was scared to walk home, especially since they had already departed which upset him deeply; saying "It will give a lasting Interest to the Drawing of the Waterfall, that I first saw it through tears. I was indeed unwell and sadly nervous; and I must not be ashamed to confess to you, my honoured Friends! that I found a bodily relief in weeping, and yielded to it"; discussing his visit with Mr. Rogers and how Wordsworth is stronger than he is which makes him melancholy and "If to be a Poet or a Man of Genius entailed on us the necessity of housing such company in our bosoms, I would pray the very flesh off my knees to have a head as dark and unfurnished, as Wordsworth's old Molly has, if only I might have a heart as careless & as loving"; discussing his belief that Wordsworth and Southey were classed with him "...as a School, originates entirely in our not hating or envying each other / it is so unusual that three professed Poets, in every respect unlike each other, should nevertheless take pleasure in each other's welfare - & reputation;" stating his love and gratitude towards them; telling a story about Derwent's dismay when he discovered that they had departed and screamed at their door "Lady Beaumont's gone away, & I WILL be a naughty boy. Lady Beaumont's gone away!"; stating if his health permits, then he will travel on Monday, but with his atonic gout, the weather and conditions could deeply impact his well-being, but he is still inclined to go to Malta with Stoddart or to Madeira; adding that he will send them the following evening "...a large coarse Sheet, containing the Leech Gatherer which Miss Wordsworth has copied out - & such of my own verses as appeared to please you (see MA 1581.25); concluding with professing his affection for them and his esteem for their friendship
Letter from Humphry Davy, place not identified, to Sir George Beaumont, 1820 December 9 : by Humphry Davy( )

1 edition published in 1820 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Sending his "earnest thanks" to Lord and Lady Beaumont for "the kind expression of your feelings"; referring to their long friendship and saying "I am doubly happy in my success since it gives pleasure to my friends"; saying that he had heard that they were going to Italy, and that he thinks they were wise to not proceed with this idea: "in these revolutionary times you ought not to run any risque for a thousand reasons: & the Roman & Neapolitan states somewhat dangerous at all times with hostile armies entering them are no fit place for the man of taste & genius [...] the impressions derived from the works of Art could no longer be received as they ought to be."
Sir George Beaumont of Coleorton, Leicestershire; " ... a painter's eye, a poet's heart"; [a catalogue of works by Sir George Beaumont at Leicester Museum and Art Gallery by Leicester Museums and Art Gallery( Book )

1 edition published in 1973 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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Audience Level
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Audience Level
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Audience level: 0.37 (from 0.07 for Samuel Tay ... to 0.95 for SIR GEORGE ...)

Covers
Deep distresses : William Wordsworth, John Wordsworth, Sir George Beaumont : 1800-1808Collector of genius : a life of Sir George Beaumont
Alternative Names
Beaumont

Beaumont, George 1753-1827

Beaumont, George Howland 1753-1827 Sir

Beaumont, George Howland 1753-1827 Sir, bart

Beaumont, George Howland, Sir

Beaumont, George Howland, Sir, 1753-1827

Beaumont, George Howland, Sir, 7th Bart.

Beaumont, George Howland, Sir, Bart.

Beaumont, George Howland, Sir, bart., 1753-1827

Beaumont, George Sir

Beaumont, George, Sir, [7th] Bart.

Beaumont, Georges Sir 1753-1827

Beaumont, Sir

Beaumont, Sir George

Beaumont, Sir George Howland

Beuamont, George H. 1753-1827

George Beaumont

George Howland Beaumont

George Howland Beaumont Sir 7th Bart.

George Howland (Sir) Beaumont Brits kunstschilder (1753-1827)

Howland Beaumont, George 1753-1827

Howland, George 1753-1827

Sir G. Beaumont

Sir G. Beaumont, Bart.

Sir Geo. Beaumont

Sir Geo. Beaumont, Bart.

Sir George Beaumont

Languages
English (88)