WorldCat Identities

Tuomilehto, Jaakko

Overview
Works: 39 works in 45 publications in 2 languages and 113 library holdings
Genres: Conference papers and proceedings  Popular works 
Roles: Author, Other, Editor
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Jaakko Tuomilehto
Proceedings of the 2nd International MONICA Congress : Helsinki, Finland, August 14-15, 1987 by 1987, Helsinki) International MONICA Congress (2( Book )

2 editions published in 1988 in English and held by 40 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Symposium on Diet and Primary Prevention of Hypertension, June 25-27, 1984, Kuopio, Finland : [proceedings] by Symposium on Diet and Primary Prevention of Hypertension( Book )

4 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 19 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Symposium on Diet and Primary Prevention of Hypertension : June 25-27, 1984, Kuopio, Finland by Kuopio) Symposium on Diet and Primary Prevention of Hypertension (1984( Book )

1 edition published in 1984 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Management strategies in diabetes : lifestyle intervention in type 2 diabetes and other conditions associated with insulin resistance( Book )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Pohjois-Karjala projektin tilannekartoitus n:o 9 : syksy 1976 by Pohjois-Karjala-projekti( Book )

1 edition published in 1977 in Finnish and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Pohjois-Karjala-projektin tilannekartoitukset n:o 7 - syksy 1975 ja n:o 8 - kevät 1976( Book )

1 edition published in 1977 in Finnish and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Feasibility of a community programme for control of hypertension : a part of the North Karelian project by Jaakko Tuomilehto( Book )

1 edition published in 1975 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Proceedings of the 2nd International MONICA Congress Helsinki, Finland : August 14-15, 1987 by International MONICA Congress( Book )

3 editions published in 1988 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

New Blood Pressure–Associated Loci Identified in Meta-Analyses of 475 000 Individuals( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : Background—: Genome-wide association studies have recently identified >400 loci that harbor DNA sequence variants that influence blood pressure (BP). Our earlier studies identified and validated 56 single nucleotide variants (SNVs) associated with BP from meta-analyses of exome chip genotype data. An additional 100 variants yielded suggestive evidence of association. Methods and Results—: Here, we augment the sample with 140 886 European individuals from the UK Biobank, in whom 77 of the 100 suggestive SNVs were available for association analysis with systolic BP or diastolic BP or pulse pressure. We performed 2 meta-analyses, one in individuals of European, South Asian, African, and Hispanic descent (pan-ancestry, ≈475 000), and the other in the subset of individuals of European descent (≈423 000). Twenty-one SNVs were genome-wide significant ( P <5×10 −8 ) for BP, of which 4 are new BP loci: rs9678851 (missense, SLC4A1AP ), rs7437940 ( AFAP1 ), rs13303 (missense, STAB1 ), and rs1055144 ( 7p15.2 ). In addition, we identified a potentially independent novel BP-associated SNV, rs3416322 (missense, SYNPO2L ) at a known locus, uncorrelated with the previously reported SNVs. Two SNVs are associated with expression levels of nearby genes, and SNVs at 3 loci are associated with other traits. One SNV with a minor allele frequency <0.01, (rs3025380 at DBH ) was genome-wide significant. Conclusions—: We report 4 novel loci associated with BP regulation, and 1 independent variant at an established BP locus. This analysis highlights several candidate genes with variation that alter protein function or gene expression for potential follow-up. Abstract : Supplemental Digital Content is available in the text
Impact of common genetic determinants of Hemoglobin A1c on type 2 diabetes risk and diagnosis in ancestrally diverse populations a transethnic genome-wide meta-analysis by Eleanor Wheeler( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Background: Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is used to diagnose type 2 diabetes (T2D) and assess glycemic control in patients with diabetes. Previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 18 HbA1c-associated genetic variants. These variants proved to be classifiable by their likely biological action as erythrocytic (also associated with erythrocyte traits) or glycemic (associated with other glucose-related traits). In this study, we tested the hypotheses that, in a very large scale GWAS, we would identify more genetic variants associated with HbA1c and that HbA1c variants implicated in erythrocytic biology would affect the diagnostic accuracy of HbA1c. We therefore expanded the number of HbA1c-associated loci and tested the effect of genetic risk-scores comprised of erythrocytic or glycemic variants on incident diabetes prediction and on prevalent diabetes screening performance. Throughout this multiancestry study, we kept a focus on interancestry differences in HbA1c genetics performance that might influence race-ancestry differences in health outcomes. Methods & findings: Using genome-wide association meta-analyses in up to 159,940 individuals from 82 cohorts of European, African, East Asian, and South Asian ancestry, we identified 60 common genetic variants associated with HbA1c. We classified variants as implicated in glycemic, erythrocytic, or unclassified biology and tested whether additive genetic scores of erythrocytic variants (GS-E) or glycemic variants (GS-G) were associated with higher T2D incidence in multiethnic longitudinal cohorts (N = 33,241). Nineteen glycemic and 22 erythrocytic variants were associated with HbA1c at genome-wide significance. GS-G was associated with higher T2D risk (incidence OR = 1.05, 95% CI 1.04-1.06, per HbA1c-raising allele, p = 3 x 10-29); whereas GS-E was not (OR = 1.00, 95% CI 0.99-1.01, p = 0.60). In Europeans and Asians, erythrocytic variants in aggregate had only modest effects on the diagnostic accuracy of HbA1c. Yet, in African Americans, the X-linked G6PD G202A variant (T-allele frequency 11%) was associated with an absolute decrease in HbA1c of 0.81%-units (95% CI 0.66-0.96) per allele in hemizygous men, and 0.68%-units (95% CI 0.38-0.97) in homozygous women. The G6PD variant may cause approximately 2% (N = 0.65 million, 95% CI0.55-0.74) of African American adults with T2Dto remain undiagnosed when screened with HbA1c. Limitations include the smaller sample sizes for non-European ancestries and the inability to classify approximately one-third of the variants. Further studies in large multiethnic cohorts with HbA1c, glycemic, and erythrocytic traits are required to better determine the biological action of the unclassified variants. Conclusions: As G6PD deficiency can be clinically silent until illness strikes, we recommend investigation of the possible benefits of screening for the G6PD genotype along with using HbA1c to diagnose T2D in populations of African ancestry or groups where G6PD deficiency is common. Screening with direct glucose measurements, or genetically-informed HbA1c diagnostic thresholds in people with G6PD deficiency, may be required to avoid missed or delayed diagnoses
Worldwide trends in body-mass index, underweight, overweight, and obesity from 1975 to 2016 a pooled analysis of 2416 population-based measurement studies in 128·9 million children, adolescents, and adults by Leandra Abarca-Goméz( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Background: Underweight, overweight, and obesity in childhood and adolescence are associated with adverse health consequences throughout the life-course. Our aim was to estimate worldwide trends in mean body-mass index (BMI) and a comprehensive set of BMI categories that cover underweight to obesity in children and adolescents, and to compare trends with those of adults. Methods: We pooled 2416 population-based studies with measurements of height and weight on 128·9 million participants aged 5 years and older, including 31·5 million aged 5–19 years. We used a Bayesian hierarchical model to estimate trends from 1975 to 2016 in 200 countries for mean BMI and for prevalence of BMI in the following categories for children and adolescents aged 5–19 years: more than 2 SD below the median of the WHO growth reference for children and adolescents (referred to as moderate and severe underweight hereafter), 2 SD to more than 1 SD below the median (mild underweight), 1 SD below the median to 1 SD above the median (healthy weight), more than 1 SD to 2 SD above the median (overweight but not obese), and more than 2 SD above the median (obesity). Findings: Regional change in age-standardised mean BMI in girls from 1975 to 2016 ranged from virtually no change (−0·01 kg/m 2 per decade; 95% credible interval −0·42 to 0·39, posterior probability [PP] of the observed decrease being a true decrease=0·5098) in eastern Europe to an increase of 1·00 kg/m 2 per decade (0·69–1·35, PP>0·9999) in central Latin America and an increase of 0·95 kg/m 2 per decade (0·64–1·25, PP>0·9999) in Polynesia and Micronesia. The range for boys was from a non-significant increase of 0·09 kg/m 2 per decade (−0·33 to 0·49, PP=0·6926) in eastern Europe to an increase of 0·77 kg/m 2 per decade (0·50–1·06, PP>0·9999) in Polynesia and Micronesia. Trends in mean BMI have recently flattened in northwestern Europe and the high-income English-speaking and Asia-Pacific regions for both sexes, southwestern Europe for boys, and central and Andean Latin America for girls. By contrast, the rise in BMI has accelerated in east and south Asia for both sexes, and southeast Asia for boys. Global age-standardised prevalence of obesity increased from 0·7% (0·4–1·2) in 1975 to 5·6% (4·8–6·5) in 2016 in girls, and from 0·9% (0·5–1·3) in 1975 to 7·8% (6·7–9·1) in 2016 in boys; the prevalence of moderate and severe underweight decreased from 9·2% (6·0–12·9) in 1975 to 8·4% (6·8–10·1) in 2016 in girls and from 14·8% (10·4–19·5) in 1975 to 12·4% (10·3–14·5) in 2016 in boys. Prevalence of moderate and severe underweight was highest in India, at 22·7% (16·7–29·6) among girls and 30·7% (23·5–38·0) among boys. Prevalence of obesity was more than 30% in girls in Nauru, the Cook Islands, and Palau; and boys in the Cook Islands, Nauru, Palau, Niue, and American Samoa in 2016. Prevalence of obesity was about 20% or more in several countries in Polynesia and Micronesia, the Middle East and north Africa, the Caribbean, and the USA. In 2016, 75 (44–117) million girls and 117 (70–178) million boys worldwide were moderately or severely underweight. In the same year, 50 (24–89) million girls and 74 (39–125) million boys worldwide were obese. Interpretation: The rising trends in children's and adolescents' BMI have plateaued in many high-income countries, albeit at high levels, but have accelerated in parts of Asia, with trends no longer correlated with those of adults. Funding: Wellcome Trust, AstraZeneca Young Health Programme
Feasibility of a community programme for control of hypertension : a part of the North Karelia projekt by Jaakko Tuomilehto( Book )

1 edition published in 1975 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A 2 year multidomain intervention of diet, exercise, cognitive training, and vascular risk monitoring versus control to prevent cognitive decline in at-risk elderly people (FINGER): a randomised controlled trial( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Background: Modifiable vascular and lifestyle-related risk factors have been associated with dementia risk in observational studies. In the Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability (FINGER), a proof-of-concept randomised controlled trial, we aimed to assess a multidomain approach to prevent cognitive decline in at-risk elderly people from the general population. Methods: In a double-blind randomised controlled trial we enrolled individuals aged 60–77 years recruited from previous national surveys. Inclusion criteria were CAIDE (Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Aging and Dementia) Dementia Risk Score of at least 6 points and cognition at mean level or slightly lower than expected for age. We randomly assigned participants in a 1:1 ratio to a 2 year multidomain intervention (diet, exercise, cognitive training, vascular risk monitoring), or a control group (general health advice). Computer-generated allocation was done in blocks of four (two individuals randomly allocated to each group) at each site. Group allocation was not actively disclosed to participants and outcome assessors were masked to group allocation. The primary outcome was change in cognition as measured through comprehensive neuropsychological test battery (NTB) Z score. Analysis was by modified intention to treat (all participants with at least one post-baseline observation). This trial is registered atClinicalTrials.gov, numberNCT01041989 . Findings: Between Sept 7, 2009, and Nov 24, 2011, we screened 2654 individuals and randomly assigned 1260 to the intervention group (n=631) or control group (n=629). 591 (94%) participants in the intervention group and 599 (95%) in the control group had at least one post-baseline assessment and were included in the modified intention-to-treat analysis. Estimated mean change in NTB total Z score at 2 years was 0·20 (SE 0·02, SD 0·51) in the intervention group and 0·16 (0·01, 0·51) in the control group. Between-group difference in the change of NTB total score per year was 0·022 (95% CI 0·002–0·042, p=0·030). 153 (12%) individuals dropped out overall. Adverse events occurred in 46 (7%) participants in the intervention group compared with six (1%) participants in the control group; the most common adverse event was musculoskeletal pain (32 [5%] individuals for intervention vs no individuals for control). Interpretation: Findings from this large, long-term, randomised controlled trial suggest that a multidomain intervention could improve or maintain cognitive functioning in at-risk elderly people from the general population. Funding: Academy of Finland, La Carita Foundation, Alzheimer Association, Alzheimer's Research and Prevention Foundation, Juho Vainio Foundation, Novo Nordisk Foundation, Finnish Social Insurance Institution, Ministry of Education and Culture, Salama bint Hamdan Al Nahyan Foundation, Axa Research Fund, EVO funding for University Hospitals of Kuopio, Oulu, and Turku and for Seinäjoki Central Hospital and Oulu City Hospital, Swedish Research Council, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, and af Jochnick Foundation
Improving visual prognosis of the diabetic patients during the past 30years based on the data of theFinnish Register of Visual Impairment( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate changes in visual impairment (VI) due to diabetic retinopathy (DR) recorded in the Finnish Register of Visual Impairment (RVI) during the past 30years. Methods: Data from the visually impaired diabetic persons included in the RVI were analysed using three 10‐year cohorts (1982–90, 1991–2000, 2001–10). Information on the age at the time of the first VI registration, severity of VI determined according to the World Health Organisation (WHO) definition, and the age at death was collected. VI due to proliferative (PDR) and non‐proliferative (NPDR) DR were analysed separately. Results: Data of 4080 patients whose primary cause for VI was DR were analysed. The median age at the time of notification of VI for the three cohorts was 39, 62 and 59years in the PDR group and 71, 73 and 73 in the NPDR group, respectively. The proportion of blind persons was 42%, 22% and 15% in the PDR group and 10%, 9% and 4% in the NPDR group, respectively. The median age at death in the three cohorts was 54, 73 and 72years in PDR group and 76, 79 and 80years in the NPDR group, respectively. The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) compared with the general population was 8.3, 2.9 and 1.4 in persons with PDR and 3.4, 2.0 and 1.2 in those with NPDR, respectively. Conclusions: A significant change in the profile of the VI in the PDR group has taken place in Finland. It was characterized by increased age at the time of VI notification, decreased severity of VI and higher age at death. Most evidently these improvements took place in the 1990s. The profile of VI in the NPDR group has changed only modestly. Compared with the general population, SMRs improved both in NPDR and PDR groups continuously
Changes in lifestyle modestly reduce the estimated cardiovascular disease risk in one-year follow-up of the Finnish diabetes prevention program (FIN-D2D)( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Aims: The purpose of this study was to assess whether changes in self-rated physical activity and diet during a type 2 diabetes (T2D) prevention program were associated with changes in estimated 10-year risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) events and mortality in people at high risk for T2D. Methods: Individuals were identified and offered lifestyle counseling as part of the Finnish diabetes prevention program. Ten-year risk for estimated CVD events and mortality were calculated with Framingham Risk Score (FRS) and Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) formula. FRS was available for 774 men and 1474 women and SCORE for 961 men and 1766 women. Results: During the one-year follow-up, 9.6% of the men reported both an increase in physical activity and improved dietary pattern, 4.1% an increase in physical activity, 39.3% an increase in improved dietary pattern, while 47.0% reported no lifestyle changes. Corresponding numbers for women were 14.2%, 3.8%, 39.2% and 42.7%. Estimated 10-year risk for CVD events decreased 3.5% in men and 1.5% in women reporting an increase in physical activity and improvement in diet, compared to an increase of 0.15% in men ( p <0.001, between groups) and decrease of 0.43% ( p =0.027, between groups) in women with no lifestyle changes after adjustment for age and baseline FRS. Numbers needed to treat to prevent one CVD event by lifestyle changes were 25 for men and 59 for women. Lifestyle changes had no effect on estimated CVD mortality risk. Conclusions: Lifestyle counseling offered in primary health care for one year results in favorable changes in lifestyle, and lowered the estimated 10-year risk for CVD events
Epigenome-wide association of DNA methylation markers in peripheral blood from Indian Asians and Europeans with incident type 2 diabetes: a nested case-control study( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Background: Indian Asians, who make up a quarter of the world's population, are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. We investigated whether DNA methylation is associated with future type 2 diabetes incidence in Indian Asians and whether differences in methylation patterns between Indian Asians and Europeans are associated with, and could be used to predict, differences in the magnitude of risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Methods: We did a nested case-control study of DNA methylation in Indian Asians and Europeans with incident type 2 diabetes who were identified from the 8-year follow-up of 25 372 participants in the London Life Sciences Prospective Population (LOLIPOP) study. Patients were recruited between May 1, 2002, and Sept 12, 2008. We did epigenome-wide association analysis using samples from Indian Asians with incident type 2 diabetes and age-matched and sex-matched Indian Asian controls, followed by replication testing of top-ranking signals in Europeans. For both discovery and replication, DNA methylation was measured in the baseline blood sample, which was collected before the onset of type 2 diabetes. Epigenome-wide significance was set at p<1 × 10 −7 . We compared methylation levels between Indian Asian and European controls without type 2 diabetes at baseline to estimate the potential contribution of DNA methylation to increased risk of future type 2 diabetes incidence among Indian Asians. Findings: 1608 (11·9%) of 13 535 Indian Asians and 306 (4·3%) of 7066 Europeans developed type 2 diabetes over a mean of 8·5 years (SD 1·8) of follow-up. The age-adjusted and sex-adjusted incidence of type 2 diabetes was 3·1 times (95% CI 2·8–3·6; p<0·0001) higher among Indian Asians than among Europeans, and remained 2·5 times (2·1–2·9; p<0·0001) higher after adjustment for adiposity, physical activity, family history of type 2 diabetes, and baseline glycaemic measures. The mean absolute difference in methylation level between type 2 diabetes cases and controls ranged from 0·5% (SD 0·1) to 1·1% (0·2). Methylation markers at five loci were associated with future type 2 diabetes incidence; the relative risk per 1% increase in methylation was 1·09 (95% CI 1·07–1·11; p=1·3 × 10 −17 ) for ABCG1, 0·94 (0·92–0·95; p=4·2 × 10 −11 ) for PHOSPHO1, 0·94 (0·92–0·96; p=1·4 × 10 −9 ) for SOCS3, 1·07 (1·04–1·09; p=2·1 × 10 −10 ) for SREBF1, and 0·92 (0·90–0·94; p=1·2 × 10 −17 ) for TXNIP . A methylation score combining results for the five loci was associated with future type 2 diabetes incidence (relative risk quartile 4 vs quartile 1 3·51, 95% CI 2·79–4·42; p=1·3 × 10 −26 ), and was independent of established risk factors. Methylation score was higher among Indian Asians than Europeans (p=1 × 10 −34 ). Interpretation: DNA methylation might provide new insights into the pathways underlying type 2 diabetes and offer new opportunities for risk stratification and prevention of type 2 diabetes among Indian Asians. Funding: The European Union, the UK National Institute for Health Research, the Wellcome Trust, the UK Medical Research Council, Action on Hearing Loss, the UK Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, the Oak Foundation, the Economic and Social Research Council, Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, the German Research Center for Environmental Health, the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, the German Center for Diabetes Research, the Munich Center for Health Sciences, the Ministry of Science and Research of the State of North Rhine-Westphalia, and the German Federal Ministry of Health
Sequence data and association statistics from 12,940 type 2 diabetes cases and controls by Jason Flannick( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

To investigate the genetic basis of type 2 diabetes (T2D) to high resolution, the GoT2D and T2D-GENES consortia catalogued variation from whole-genome sequencing of 2,657 European individuals and exome sequencing of 12,940 individuals of multiple ancestries. Over 27M SNPs, indels, and structural variants were identified, including 99% of low-frequency (minor allele frequency [MAF] 0.1-5%) non-coding variants in the whole-genome sequenced individuals and 99.7% of low-frequency coding variants in the whole-exome sequenced individuals. Each variant was tested for association with T2D in the sequenced individuals, and, to increase power, most were tested in larger numbers of individuals (> 80% of low-frequency coding variants in similar to 82 K Europeans via the exome chip, and similar to 90% of low-frequency non-coding variants in similar to 44 K Europeans via genotype imputation). The variants, genotypes, and association statistics from these analyses provide the largest reference to date of human genetic information relevant to T2D, for use in activities such as T2D-focused genotype imputation, functional characterization of variants or genes, and other novel analyses to detect associations between sequence variation and T2D
Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 11 new loci for anthropometric traits and provides insights into genetic architecture by Sonja I Berndt( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Approaches exploiting trait distribution extremes may be used to identify loci associated with common traits, but it is unknown whether these loci are generalizable to the broader population. In a genome-wide search for loci associated with the upper versus the lower 5th percentiles of body mass index, height and waist-to-hip ratio, as well as clinical classes of obesity, including up to 263,407 individuals of European ancestry, we identified 4 new loci (IGFBP4, H6PD, RSRC1 and PPP2R2A) influencing height detected in the distribution tails and 7 new loci (HNF4G, RPTOR, GNAT2, MRPS33P4, ADCY9, HS6ST3 and ZZZ3) for clinical classes of obesity. Further, we find a large overlap in genetic structure and the distribution of variants between traits based on extremes and the general population and little etiological heterogeneity between obesity subgroups
 
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Alternative Names
Jaakko Tuomilehto Finnish professor emeritus of public health science (University of Helsinki); academy professor (Academy of Finland); research professor (Finnish National Institute for Health and Welfare)

Jaakko Tuomilehto suomalainen Helsingin yliopiston kansanterveystieteen emeritusprofessori; akatemiaprofessori (Suomen Akatemia) ja tutkimusprofessori (Kansanterveyslaitos, nyk. Terveyden ja hyvinvoinnin laitos)

Tuomilehto, J.

Tuomilehto, J. (Jaakko)

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