WorldCat Identities

Slezkine, Yuri 1956-

Overview
Works: 31 works in 154 publications in 9 languages and 5,909 library holdings
Genres: History  Biography  Biographies  Conversation and phrase books  Textbooks  Phrase books  Academic theses 
Roles: Author, Editor, Translator, Thesis advisor, Other, Interviewee
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Yuri Slezkine
 
Most widely held works by Yuri Slezkine
The Jewish century by Yuri Slezkine( )

52 editions published between 2004 and 2018 in 7 languages and held by 2,258 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The author claims that not only have Jews adapted better than many other groups to living in the modern world, they have become the premiere symbol and standard of modern life everywhere. The Jews traditionally belonged to a social category known as "service nomads," an outsider group specializing in the delivery of goods and services. This role--urban, mobile, literate, articulate, intellectually intricate, physically fastidious, and occupationally flexible--has taken center stage in the modern age. Marxism and Freudianism sprang largely from the Jewish predicament, and both Soviet Bolshevism and American liberalism were affected in fundamental ways by the Jewish exodus from the Pale of Settlement. The book concentrates on the drama of the Russian Jews, including migrš and their offspring in America, Palestine, and the Soviet Union. But Slezkine has as much to say about the many faces of modernity as he does about Jewry.--Publisher
Arctic mirrors : Russia and the small peoples of the North by Yuri Slezkine( )

24 editions published between 1994 and 2016 in English and held by 1,367 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"And, sovereign, having captured a shaman in battle, we asked him: what kind of man are you and do you have kinsmen? And he said: I am the best man of the Shoromboiskii clan and I have four sons. And so we kept him as hostage." For over five hundred years the Russians have been wondering what kind of people their Arctic and sub-Arctic hostages were. "They have mouths between their shoulders and eyes in their chests," reported a fifteenth-century tale. "They rove around, live of their own free will, and beat the Russian people," complained a seventeenth-century Cossack. "Their actions are exceedingly rude. They do not take off their hats and do not bow to each other," huffed an eighteenth-century scholar. They are "children of nature" and "guardians of ecological balance," rhapsodized early nineteenth-century and late twentieth-century romantics. Even the bolsheviks, who categorized the circumpolar foragers as authentic proletarians," were repeatedly puzzled by the "peoples ... from the late Neolithic period who, by virtue of their extreme backwardness, cannot keep up either economically or culturally with the furious speed of the emerging socialist society." Whether described as brutes, aliens, or endangered indigenous populations, the so-called small peoples of the north have consistently remained a point of contrast for speculations on Russian identity and a convenient testing ground for policies and images that grew out of these speculations. In a vividly rendered history of circumpolar peoples in the Russian empire - and in the Russian mind - Yuri Slezkine offers the first in-depth interpretation of this relationship. No other book in any language links the history of a colonized non-Russian people to the full sweep of Russian intellectual and cultural history. Enhancing his account with vintage prints and photographs, Slezkine reenacts the procession of Russian fur traders, missionaries, tsarist bureaucrats, radical intellectuals, professional ethnographers, and commissars who struggled to reform and conceptualize this most "alien" of their subject populations. He reconstructs from a vast range of sources the successive official policies and prevailing attitudes toward the northern peoples, interweaving the resonant narratives of Russian and indigenous contemporaries with the extravagant images of popular Russian fiction. As he examines the many ironies and ambivalences involved in successive Russian attempts to overcome northern - and hence their own - otherness - Slezkine explores the wider issues of ethnic identity, cultural change, nationalist rhetoric, and not-so-European colonialism
The House of Government : a saga of the Russian Revolution by Yuri Slezkine( Book )

18 editions published between 2012 and 2017 in 4 languages and held by 890 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"On the 100th anniversary of the Russian Revolution, the epic story of an enormous apartment building where Communist true believers lived before their destruction. The House of Government is unlike any other book about the Russian Revolution and the Soviet experiment. Written in the tradition of Tolstoy's War and Peace, Grossman's Life and Fate, and Solzhenitsyn's The Gulag Archipelago, Yuri Slezkine's gripping narrative tells the true story of the residents of an enormous Moscow apartment building where top Communist officials and their families lived before they were destroyed in Stalin's purges. A vivid account of the personal and public lives of Bolshevik true believers, the book begins with their conversion to Communism and ends with their children's loss of faith and the fall of the Soviet Union. Completed in 1931, the House of Government, later known as the House on the Embankment, was located across the Moscow River from the Kremlin. The largest residential building in Europe, it combined 550 furnished apartments with public spaces that included everything from a movie theater and a library to a tennis court and a shooting range. Slezkine tells the chilling story of how the building's residents lived in their apartments and ruled the Soviet state until some eight hundred of them were evicted from the House and led, one by one, to prison or their deaths. Drawing on letters, diaries, and interviews, and featuring hundreds of rare photographs, The House of Government weaves together biography, literary criticism, architectural history, and fascinating new theories of revolutions, millennial prophecies, and reigns of terror. The result is an unforgettable human saga of a building that, like the Soviet Union itself, became a haunted house, forever disturbed by the ghosts of the disappeared"--Provided by publisher
In the shadow of revolution : life stories of Russian women from 1917 to the second World War( Book )

11 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 753 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Between heaven and hell : the myth of Siberia in Russian culture by Galya Diment( Book )

9 editions published in 1993 in English and Undetermined and held by 371 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Siberia has no history of independent political existence, no claim to a separate ethnic identity, and no clear borders. And yet, in some very important sense, the elusive country "behind the Urals" is the most real and the most durable part of the Russian landscape. For centuries, Siberia has been represented as Russia's alter ego, as the heavenly or infernal antithesis to the perceived complexity or shallowness of Russian life. It has been both the frightening heart of darkness and a fabulous land of plenty; the "House of the Dead" and the realm of utter freedom; a frozen wasteland and a colorful frontier; a dumping ground for Russia's rejects and the last refuge of its lost innocence. The contributors to Between Heaven and Hell examine the origin, nature, and implications of these images from historical, literary, geographical, anthropological, and linguistic perspectives. They create a fascinating picture of this enormous and mysterious land
Speak Russian! by Marisa Fushille( Book )

3 editions published in 1990 in English and held by 130 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The house of government : a saga of the Russian revolution by Yuri Slezkine( )

2 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 38 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Slezkine's gripping narrative tells the true story of the residents of an enormous Moscow apartment building where top Communist officials and their families lived before they were destroyed in Stalin's purges. A vivid account of the personal and public lives of Bolshevik true believers, the book begins with their conversion to Communism and ends with their children's loss of faith and the fall of the Soviet Union."--Provided by publisher
Het huis van de regering : een familiesaga uit het Sovjet tijdperk by Yuri Slezkine( Book )

1 edition published in 2017 in Dutch and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Geschiedenis van de Russische Revolutie en de jaren die daarop volgden aan de hand van de lotgevallen van de bewoners van een grote flat voor partijleden en andere hooggeplaatste personen
Arkticheskie zerkala : Rossii︠a︡ i malye narody Severa by Yuri Slezkine( Book )

4 editions published between 2008 and 2017 in Russian and held by 17 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Russia's small peoples : the policies and attitudes towards the native northerners, 17th century-1938 by Yuri Slezkine( )

8 editions published between 1989 and 1992 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Il secolo ebraico by Yuri Slezkine( Book )

1 edition published in 2011 in Italian and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Arktičeskie zerkala : Rossija i malye narody Severa by Yuri Slezkine( Book )

2 editions published between 2008 and 2017 in Russian and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Žydu šimt-metis by Yuri Slezkine( Book )

1 edition published in 2010 in Lithuanian and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Red Kasrilevke : ethnographies of economic transformation in the Soviet Shtetl 1917-1939 by Deborah Hope Yalen( )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This dissertation is about the Soviet Jewish elite's encounter with the shtetl (Yiddish: small market town) during the 1920s and 1930s. In Imperial Russia, a significant number of Jews living in the shtetl worked as economic middlemen between city and countryside, a form of commercial activity deemed "unproductive" by conservative and radical critics alike. Following the October Revolution, the Bolshevik paradigm of a worker-peasant state rendered the historical role of Jews as economic middlemen--and the shtetl as a site of petty trade--ideologically untenable. This study examines the efforts of Soviet Jewish political activists and social scientists to confront the shtetl as both a practical and theoretical problem at a time when the Bolshevik regime was consolidating its power and entering a radically accelerated phase of economic modernization. This encounter between the Soviet Jewish elite and the "shtetl problem" represents an understudied chapter in the history of pan-European debates, dating back to the Enlightenment, which evaluated Jewish civic virtue and worthiness for emancipation in relationship to Jewish economic behavior
Das Haus der Regierung : eine Saga der Russischen Revolution by Yuri Slezkine( Book )

1 edition published in 2018 in German and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Naturalists versus nations eighteenth-century russian scholars confront ethnic diversity by Yuri Slezkine( )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The fall of Soviet ethnography, 1928-38 by Yuri Slezkine( )

1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Le siècle juif présentation et discussion de l'ouvrage de Yuri Slezkine( Visual )

1 edition published in 2013 in French and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The USSR as a communal apartment, or how a socialist state promoted ethnic particularism by Yuri Slezkine( )

1 edition published in 1996 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The Jewish century by Yuri Slezkine( Recording )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The author claims that not only have Jews adapted better than many other groups to living in the modern world, they have become the premiere symbol and standard of modern life everywhere. The Jews traditionally belonged to a social category known as "service nomads," an outsider group specializing in the delivery of goods and services. This role--urban, mobile, literate, articulate, intellectually intricate, physically fastidious, and occupationally flexible--has taken center stage in the modern age. Marxism and Freudianism sprang largely from the Jewish predicament, and both Soviet Bolshevism and American liberalism were affected in fundamental ways by the Jewish exodus from the Pale of Settlement. The book concentrates on the drama of the Russian Jews, including m̌igrš and their offspring in America, Palestine, and the Soviet Union. But [the author] has as much to say about the many faces of modernity as he does about Jewry.--Publisher
 
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The Jewish century
Covers
Arctic mirrors : Russia and the small peoples of the NorthIn the shadow of revolution : life stories of Russian women from 1917 to the second World WarBetween heaven and hell : the myth of Siberia in Russian cultureSpeak Russian!The Jewish century
Alternative Names
Slezkin, I︠U︡riĭ 1956-

Slezkin, Jurij.

Slëzkin, Jurij 1956-

Slëzkin, Jurij Lʹvovič 1956-

Slëzkin, Ûrij

Slezkin, Ûrij L'vovič

Slezkine, Juri 1956-

Slezkine Y. историк, писатель 1956-

Sljoskin, Jurij 1956-

Yuri Slezkine American writer

Yuri Slezkine Amerikaans auteur

Yuri Slezkine écrivain américain

Yuri Slezkine escritor estadounidense

Yuri Slezkine US-amerikanischer Historiker, Autor, Übersetzer und Hochschullehrer

Слезкин, Лев Юрьевич.

Слёзкин Ю. историк, писатель 1956-

Слёзкин Ю. Л. историк, писатель 1956-

Слёзкин, Юрий

Слёзкин, Юрий 1956-

Слёзкин, Юрий Львович

Слёзкин, Юрий Львович 1956-

Слезкинъ, Юрій

יורי סלזקין

יורי סלזקין סופר אמריקאי

סלזקין, יורי 1956-

Languages