WorldCat Identities

McLellon, Waldron M.

Overview
Works: 27 works in 29 publications in 1 language and 164 library holdings
Genres: History  Fiction  Academic theses  Personal narratives‡vAmerican 
Roles: Author, Thesis advisor, Inscriber
Classifications: BF637.S4, FIC
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Waldron M McLellon
 
Most widely held works by Waldron M McLellon
Leather and soul : a Civil War odyssey : from bondage to freedom-- a passage of body and soul by Waldron M McLellon( Book )

2 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 108 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A slave-owning planter, fighting for the North, breaks out of a Confederate jail and is taken in by a black slave. The planter has to rely on the slave to outwit his pursuers--he has to paint his face black--and the novel chronicles the impact this has on his attitude on slavery
One step, two step : a Civil War sequel by Waldron M McLellon( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Megabyting my mind : 59 plug-ins to add power by Waldron M McLellon( Book )

1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Proceedings : workshop on environmental impact statements, June 12-13, 1973 by Workshop on Environmental Impact Statements( Book )

1 edition published in 1973 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Boys to men : stories of men who served aboard the USS Perkins during World War II by William P Mitchell( Book )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Guide for urban transportation planning package by William R Whidden( )

1 edition published in 1974 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Removal of hydrogen sulfide from ground water in Central Florida by Thomas G Lochrane( )

1 edition published in 1977 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The presence of hydrogen sulfide in a ground water source is noted by its rather obnoxious odor, similar to a "rotten egg". Concentrations as low as 0.05 ppm are noticeable, therefore, almost its entire removal is demanded prior to potable consumption. Hydrogen sulfide is formed primarily by the decomposition of organic matter in anaerobic conditions. Removal of this gas has been accomplished by means of aeration, detention, and chlorination over the years. The mechanisms behind each of these processes are complex and discussed in this paper. During the course of this investigation, a literature survey concerning the mature and sources of hydrogen sulfide, its removal by aeration and detention, and the experimental methodology has been conducted. Samples were collected from two ground water locations in Central Florida, namely City of Apopka Terrace Plant, and the City of Maitland Thistle Plant. These samples were taken before and after aeration and detained in containers similar to the storage tank dimensions. These samples were tested for Hydrogen Sulfide and pH with respect to time. The aerators were determined to remove 13 to 15 percent H₂S, respectively. The pH values ranged between 7 - 8 prior to detention and rose slowly during H₂S ionization to 8-8.6. Both locations were evaluated to determine the most economic operating conditions. Ideally, Apopka should be removing between 30 - 40 percent by means of aeration, and Maitland, between 40 - 50 percent. Chlorination will remove the remaining H₂S. Although the existing aerators were operating less than their optimum removal range, they should remain in service. This is based on deducting the aerator "sunk costs" from the economic evaluation. Efforts should be encouraged to improve aerator efficiencies by increased agitation, contact time, and weir overflow rates in the aerator trays. These measures should increase the H₂S reaction rate and improve its removal. Detention only removes the odor problem, but the chlorine demand still remains, as exerted by the forms HS- and S=
A review of municipal services provided by the City of Lakeland by Roberto Ignacio Pedroso( )

1 edition published in 1977 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

For this report, four municipal services provided by the City of Lakeland were studied. The environmental impact of these services was discussed. Recommendations were made for solutions to problems found. It was found that the water supply services has on deleterious impact on the environment. Hydrogen sulfide occasionally found in the water supply gives the latter objectionable odor and taste. Installation of a centralized water treatment plant with aeration facilities for hydrogen sulfide removal was recommended for resolution of the problem. The waste water treatment plant removes 91% of the BOD5 and the suspended solids in the plant influent. The plant effluent and dried sludge are used for irrigation and fertilization in local agricultural enterprises. It was concluded that this service has a beneficial impact on the environment. It was determined that the electric power supply service has one deleterious impact on the environment. Sulfur dioxide emitted from five power generating units results in higher than allowable ground level concentrations. Several recommendations were made for resolution of the problem. Taller stacks were recommended for all five units. Burning lower sulfur content fuel oil was recommended for three of the units. Installation of an ammonia scrubbing system for sulfur dioxide removal was recommended for the other two units. Sanitary landfill disposal of solid waste collected by the city has two potentially deleterious impacts on the environment. Available land area may be quickly exhausted. Water runoff may leach undesirable materials out of buried refuse and contaminate ground water supplies. Incinerations of Lakeland's solid waste in one of the city's power generating unites was recommended as the solution to the problem. As follow-up to this report, a discussion has been held with city officials concerning the potential sulfur dioxide problem
Electromagnetic fields in water treatment by Robert H Fagan( )

1 edition published in 1974 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Properties and characteristics of colloidal systems are reviewed with a discussion of colloid systems to be found in natural and wastewaters. Current electric and magnetic field theory are reviewed and summarized to provide practical application of the theory to engineering problems in the environmental field. Literature of colloidal reactions to electrical and magnetic fields is discussed and reviewed to ascertain areas of potential application of electric and magnetic phenomena to natural and wastewater treatment systems having objectionable colloid suspensions. It is concluded that application of electrical fields (electrophoresis) does not currently hold much promise for practical applications in water treatment systems. However, and understanding of colloid systems and electrophoresis is strongly recommended for personnel involved in chemical treatment of waters. It is shown that there has been considerable research and many applications of magnetic field treatment of waters by the Russians, most analysis of which is performed in an empirical manner that tends to cloud the phenomena with an aura of mysticism. Practical applications of magnetic field phenomena to water treatment systems involving ferromagnetic colloidal suspensions appears promising and research into this area is recommended
Septic tank and chemical pumpings evaluation by George C Cushnie( )

1 edition published in 1975 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Environmental aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle and high-level radioactive waste disposal by Robert S Kent( )

1 edition published in 1979 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

An assessment of the environmental effects of the nuclear fuel cycle industries is discussed, reactor waste inventory and standards are presented, and the alternatives for high-level radioactive waste disposal reviewed, with particular attention being given to disposal in deep geological formations on land. One of the major concerns regarding potential impacts of the nuclear fuel cycle industries is the lack of a definite and proven method of disposal of the high-level radioactive wastes from light water moderated reactors. The problem is expected to become more pressing as the nuclear power industry and the associated radioactive waste inventories grow in the strife to meet ever-increasing demands for energy. The current trend in waste management is towards reprocessing to recover unburned uranium and plutonium from spent reactor fuel and towards final disposal in deep geological formations (hard rock or salt) on land. Studies appear to support the viability of such a waste management and disposal concept for high-level radioactive wastes
Sewer system evaluation surveys conducted in industrial plants by Robert B Cadle( )

1 edition published in 1980 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

"Sewer System Evaluation Surveys Conducted in Industrial Sewers," describes the methods employed and the results of Sewer System Evaluation Survey studies conducted at two industrial complexes. The procedural techniques for locating and quantifying infiltration and inflow into sewer systems represented to provide a basic understanding of the steps required to complete such studies. Case studies of actual surveys conducted at two privately operated industrial plants in Tennessee are presented to illustrate the utilization of the investigative techniques. The results of the studies are compared with each other and with similar studies conducted in municipal sewer systems
Critical exposure pathways : an analysis of the environmental impact of gaseous effluents from light-water-cooled reactors by Robert Danna( )

1 edition published in 1979 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The analysis of the environmental impact of routine radioactive gaseous releases from operating nuclear power stations is discussed using a radiation dose assessment. This analysis includes a discussion of the origin of radionuclide effluents, a discussion of federal policies, and a calculation of radiation doses to man. A model of estimating the radioactive dose from gaseous effluents from light-water-cooled reactors is described using guidelines described in the Code of Federal Regulations and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Regulatory Guides. The environmental impact of these sources is then analyzed using dose rates calculated along critical exposure pathways for various radioactive nuclides. Examples are given using factors that have been heretofore documented in the literature. The major radionuclides in the airborne effluents from a PWR, used as an example are noble gases, H-3, radioiodines, and radioactive particles. The results from the methodologies described in this paper are compared to federal radiation limits
Rapid mixing in water and wastewater treatment by Randall C Rector( )

1 edition published in 1972 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

An industrial wastewater treatment review for the textile and and pulp and paper industries of Srilanka by Kolonne A Wijeratne( )

1 edition published in 1976 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A legislative authority empowered to protect Srilanka's environment, operating similarly to the Environmental Protection Agency of the U.S., is needed, along with wastewater treatment. Wastewater parameters of importance in treatment are BOD, COD, total suspended solids, settleable solids, pH, colour, turbidity, ammonia or nitrate nitrogen, heavy metals, sulfides, phosphates, and phenols. Methods of industrial waste treatment vary depending on the climatic conditions, the industry, raw materials, and process adopted. Textile and pulp and paper industries exist in Srilanka and have very high pollution potential. Methods of treatment to finally generate reasonably good quality effluent are available. Processing of effluents from these type industries together with municipal sewage is feasible and economical. Due to the complex nature of the composition of industrial wastes, a final decision could only be made after a thorough investigation of the industrial complexes, the methodology used, and pilot plant studies
Safety and environmental effects of nuclear power plants by Raymond E Schweikart( )

1 edition published in 1973 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The nuclear power plant has given new direction to power generation. It offers a new source of heat. The heat can now come from the fission of atomic fuel and not from the burning of fossil fuel. Safety and protection from the possible hazards of radioactivity generated by nuclear power plants is a completely new and untested area. Emergency systems and over designed construction are only part of what has to be done to make absolutely certain such accidents, if they occur, will be contained allowing no harmful radioactivity to reach the environment. Handling of radioactive wastes is very critical in a nuclear power plant. These wastes have to be stored in protective containers and transported to predetermined storage sites. At these sites the containers of radioactive wastes are lowered into large salt mines. Licensing and regulation of nuclear power plants during construction and operation is the responsibility of the Atomic Energy Commission. The five member federal panel has issues strict requirements that must be met in each step in the process of obtaining permits and licenses, construction, and generation
An investigation of fabric filtration for the removal of colloidal turbidity from a laboratory water by David Brent Jansen( )

1 edition published in 1980 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A kaolin in tapwater suspension was treated either with alum or one of two cationic polymers. The resulting suspension was filtered through various configurations of felt cloth filters. The kaolin suspension was adjusted to 100 JTU. Treatment by polymer consistently lowered the filtered effluent to less than 1 JTU. Jar tests were utilized to determine optimum coagulant dose for the tests. The formulation of a complete filter cake in the filter appeared to be the determining factor in the efficiency of water clarification by the filter. The literature lacked references to this concept as applied to water supply problems. The results of this report suggest that continuous filtration should now be examined
 
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Megabyting my mind : 59 plug-ins to add power
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Boys to men : stories of men who served aboard the USS Perkins during World War II
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English (24)