WorldCat Identities

University of Massachusetts at Lowell

Overview
Works: 181 works in 192 publications in 2 languages and 1,027 library holdings
Genres: Conference papers and proceedings  History  Outlines and syllabi  Methods (Music)  Criticism, interpretation, etc 
Roles: Researcher, Publisher, Other
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about University of Massachusetts at Lowell
 
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Most widely held works by University of Massachusetts at Lowell
Radio soundings and plasma physics : 2007 Radio Plasma Imager Science Team Meeting, April 27, 2007 ; Radio Sounding and Plasma Physics Symposium, April 29, 2007 ; XI International Digisonde Forum, April 30-May 3, 2007 by Radio Plasma Imager Science Team Meeting( Book )

4 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 108 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

International Conference on Electronic Systems, Signal Processing, and Computing Technologies : proceedings : 9-11 January 2014, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India by Signal Processing, and Computing Technologies International Conference on Electronic Systems( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 71 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The sociology of the Holocaust and genocide : a teaching and learning guide( Book )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 37 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Development and field testing of Multiple Deployment Model Pile (MDMP) by Samuel G Paikowsky( Book )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 25 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A model pile is a calibrated tool equipped with instrumentation capable of monitoring the pile/soil interaction over the pile history. Monitoring includes the installation, pore pressure dissipation combined with consolidation and soil pressure equalization, and ultimately the pile behavior under loading and failure. The model pile installation and soil structure interaction simulate the actual field conditions of full-scale piles. As such, the obtained information can be utilized directly (e.g., skin friction) or extrapolated (e.g., pore pressure dissipation time) to predict the soil's response during full-scale installation. The Multiple Deployment Model Pile (MDMP) was developed as an in situ tool for site investigations
A simplified field method for capacity evaluation of driven piles by Samuel G Paikowsky( Book )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 24 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A simplified method based on energy balance between the total energy delivered to the pile and the work done by the pile/soil systems is proposed. This method, entitled the Energy Approach, assumes elastoplastic load displacement pile-soil relations. Calculated transferred energy and maximum pile displacement from the measured data, together with the field blow count, are used as input parameters. This method does not consider the propagation process and is aimed at providing a real-time pile-capacity prediction in the field. Two large data sets were gathered at the University of Massachusetts at Lowell
Videotapes for functional training for physical rehabilitation by Susan B O'Sullivan( Visual )

2 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Understand the why and how of therapeutic exercise techniques
Expanding our understanding of the psychosocial work environment : a compendium of measures of discrimination, harassment and work-family issues( Book )

2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"In 1996, NIOSH created the National Occupational Research Agenda to advance occupational safety and health research for the nation. This agenda encompassed 21 priority research areas, including Special Populations at Risk. This priority area was created in recognition of the fact that the nation's increasingly diverse workforce contains many women, older workers, and racial and ethnic minorities. Disparities in the burden of disease, disability, and death are experienced by these groups, due in part to their disproportionate employment in high hazard industries and to certain social, cultural and political factors. This document was developed by the investigators from the University of Massachusetts Lowell at the request of the Special Populations at Risk Team to fill that gap by disseminating to the broader occupational safety and health community a concise and accessible compendium of measures used by health researchers to assess the following domains: racism and racial/ethnic prejudice, sexism and sexual harassment, gender and racial discrimination, work-family integration and balance, support for diversity in the workplace/workforce."--Page iii
L'ouest Francais et la Francophonie Nord-Américaine by Université d'Angers( Book )

1 edition published in 1996 in French and held by 17 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Measuring pollutant removal efficiencies of stormwater treatment units by Xiaoqi Zhang( Book )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study evaluated the bacteria removal efficiency, and bacteria distribution and survivability within a structural best management practice (BMP) called Vortechs System (manufactured by Stormwater 360, formerly Vortechnics, Inc.) installed at two different sites in Providence, Rhode Island. Twelve rain events with precipitations greater than 0.1 inch were sampled over a two year period. Five pathogenic indicator bacteria, E. coli, Enterococci, Fecal Streptococci, Total Coliform, Fecal Coliform, were analyzed. Based on the author's research, maintenance strategies such as more frequent sediment removal may be necessary to prevent pathogen-rich washouts to receiving waters. Structural BMPs near busy streets and highways should be cleaned our more frequently
A campus-wide mission : the scholarship of teaching by Mary L Beaudry( Book )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Regulatory and practical issues in the promotion of toxics use reduction in Massachusetts( Book )

2 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Solution Behavior of Modified Polyethylenimine (PEI) Polymers by Light Scattering Investigations( )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The eight average molecular weights, as well as other characteristics such as the second virial coefficients and root-mean-square (RMS) radii of gyration of poly (ethyleneimine) (PEI) and various derivatives, have been determined in solution light scattering studies. The solution dynamics of PEI and carboxylated and phosphorylated derivatives were studied a pH of 3.3, 7.0 and 10.0. Measurements were made in freshly distilled and de-ionized water as well as in 0.1 M, 1 M and 5-M solutions of sodium chloride in water. Molecular weights were calculated from Berry plots. The purified polymer, PEI-1, gave a molecular weight of 39,600 g/mol., while the same polymer, which was not purified, PEI-2, has MW of 43,100 g/mol
Novel Nuclear Powered Photocatalytic Energy Conversion( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The University of Massachusetts Lowell Radiation Laboratory (UMLRL) is involved in a comprehensive project to investigate a unique radiation sensing and energy conversion technology with applications for in-situ monitoring of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) during cask transport and storage. The technology makes use of the gamma photons emitted from the SNF as an inherent power source for driving a GPS-class transceiver that has the ability to verify the position and contents of the SNF cask. The power conversion process, which converts the gamma photon energy into electrical power, is based on a variation of the successful dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) design developed by Konarka Technologies, Inc. (KTI). In particular, the focus of the current research is to make direct use of the high-energy gamma photons emitted from SNF, coupled with a scintillator material to convert some of the incident gamma photons into photons having wavelengths within the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum. The high-energy gammas from the SNF will generate some power directly via Compton scattering and the photoelectric effect, and the generated visible photons output from the scintillator material can also be converted to electrical power in a manner similar to that of a standard solar cell. Upon successful implementation of an energy conversion device based on this new gammavoltaic principle, this inherent power source could then be utilized within SNF storage casks to drive a tamper-proof, low-power, electronic detection/security monitoring system for the spent fuel. The current project has addressed several aspects associated with this new energy conversion concept, including the development of a base conceptual design for an inherent gamma-induced power conversion unit for SNF monitoring, the characterization of the radiation environment that can be expected within a typical SNF storage system, the initial evaluation of Konarka's base solar cell design, the design and fabrication of a range of new cell materials and geometries at Konarka's manufacturing facilities, and the irradiation testing and evaluation of these new cell designs within the UML Radiation Laboratory. The primary focus of all this work was to establish the proof of concept of the basic gammavoltaic principle using a new class of dye-sensitized photon converter (DSPC) materials based on KTI's original DSSC design. In achieving this goal, this report clearly establishes the viability of the basic gammavoltaic energy conversion concept, yet it also identifies a set of challenges that must be met for practical implementation of this new technology
Laboratory Investigations in Support of Carbon Dioxide-Limestone Sequestration in the Ocean( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This semi-annual progress reports includes further findings on CO{sub 2}-in-Water emulsions stabilized by fine particles of limestone (CaCO{sub 3}). Specifically, here we report on the tests performed in the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory High Pressure Water Tunnel Facility (HPWTF) using a Kenics-type static mixer for the formation of a CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O emulsion stabilized by fine particles of CaCO{sub 3}. The tested static mixer has an ID of 0.5 cm, length 23.5 cm, number of baffles 27. Under pressure, a slurry of CaCO{sub 3} particles (mean particle size 6 {micro}m) in reverse osmosis (RO) water and liquid CO{sub 2} were co-injected into the mixer. From the mixer, the resulting emulsion flowed into the HPWTF, which was filled with RO water kept at 6.8 MPa pressure and 4, 8 or 12 C. The emulsion plume was photographed by three video cameras through spy windows mounted on the wall of the HPWTF. The mixer produced an emulsion consisting of tiny CO{sub 2} droplets sheathed with a layer of CaCO{sub 3} particles dispersed in water. The sheathed droplets are called globules. The globules diameter was measured to be in the 300-500 {micro}m range. The globules were sinking in the HPWTF, indicating that they are heavier than the ambient water. The tests in the HPWTF confirmed that the Kenics-type static mixer is an efficient device for forming a CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O emulsion stabilized by fine particles of CaCO{sub 3}. The static mixer may prove to be a practical device for sequestering large quantities of CO{sub 2} in the deep ocean in the form of a CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-CaCO{sub 3} emulsion. The static mixer can be mounted at the end of pipelines feeding the mixer. The static mixer has no moving parts. The pressure drop across the mixer that is necessary to sustain good mixing is created by the hydrostatic pressure of liquid CO{sub 2} and the slurry of CaCO{sub 3} in the pipes that feed the mixer. The tests in the HPWTF demonstrated that the emulsion plume is heavier than ambient seawater, hence the plume will sink to greater depth from the release point. Preliminary modeling indicates that an emulsion plume released at 500 m depth (the minimum depth required to prevent liquid CO{sub 2} flashing into vapor) may sink hundreds of meters before the plume comes to rest in the density stratified ocean water. Furthermore, tests in our laboratory showed that the emulsion is slightly alkaline, not acidic, because of the excess of CaCO{sub 3} particles present in the plume. Thus, the release of the CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}OCaCO{sub 3} emulsion in the deep ocean is not likely to acidify the seawater around the release point. The possible acidification of seawater is the major environmental hazard if pure liquid CO{sub 2} were released in the deep ocean
Laboratory Investigations in Support of Carbon Dioxide-in-Water Emulsions Stabilized by Fine Particles for Ocean and Geologic Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This semi-annual progress report includes our latest research on deep ocean sequestration of CO{sub 2}-in-Water (C/W) emulsions stabilized by pulverized limestone (CaCO{sub 3}). We describe a practical system that could be employed for the release of a dense C/W emulsion. The heart of the system is a Kenics-type static mixer. The testing and evaluation of a static mixer in the NETL High-Pressure Water Tunnel Facility was described in the previous semi-annual report. The release system could be deployed from a floating platform over the open ocean, or at the end of an off-shore pipe laying on the continental slope. Because the emulsion is much denser than ambient seawater, modeling shows that upon release the plume will sink much deeper from the injection point, increasing the sequestration time for CO{sub 2}. When released in the open ocean, a plume containing the output of a 500 MW{sub el} coal-fired power plant will typically sink hundreds of meters below the injection point. When released from a pipe on the continental shelf, the plume will sink about twice as much because of the limited entrainment of ambient seawater when the plume flows along the sloping seabed. Furthermore, the plume is slightly alkaline, not acidic. The disadvantage is that the creation of the emulsion requires significant amounts of pulverized limestone, on the order of 0.5-0.75 weight ratio of limestone to CO{sub 2}. While pulverized limestone with particle size appropriate for creating C/W emulsions can be purchased for $38 per ton, it is shown in this report that it may be more economic to purchase raw limestone from quarries and pulverize it in situ using grinding mills. In this case the major cost elements are the capital and operating costs of the grinding mills, resulting in a total cost of about $11 per ton of pulverized limestone, including the cost of raw material and shipping. Because we need approximately 0.75 ton of pulverized limestone per ton of liquid CO2 to create a stable C/W emulsion, the total cost of preparing the emulsion on site is about $8.5 per ton of liquid CO{sub 2}, not including the cost of the emulsion mixer. Currently, the cost estimates of capturing and liquefying CO{sub 2} at a coal-fired power plant range from $15 to 75/t CO{sub 2}. Thus, the preparation of C/W emulsions stabilized by pulverized limestone particles would add about 10 to 50% to the capture cost of CO{sub 2}. At this juncture the primary research objectives of this Co-operative Agreement are shifting toward geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide. Experiments are underway to create micro-emulsions of CO{sub 2}-in-Water (C/W) and Water-in-CO{sub 2} (W/C) stabilized by ultrafine particles ranging from sub-micrometer to a few micrometer in size. Such microemulsions are expected to readily penetrate deep geologic formations, such as porous sedimentary layers, including saline aquifers and semi-depleted oil and gas fields. Injections of (C/W) and (W/C) type micro-emulsions may prove to be less prone to leakage from the formations compared to injections of neat liquid or supercritical CO{sub 2}
Application of toxics use reduction to OSHA policy and programs( Book )

1 edition published in 1995 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Stability and heat transfer in time-modulated flows( )

1 edition published in 1992 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The report outlines research activities currently underway in the Laboratory for Advanced Computation at the University of Massachusetts - Lowell under DOE grant DE-FG02-91ER14179. A summary of the results for the period November 1991 to November 1992 conducted under the program is given
Laboratory Investigations in Support of Carbon Dioxide-in-Water Emulsions Stabilized by Fine Particles for Ocean and Geologic Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide( )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Since the submission of our last Semi-annual Report, dated September 2006, the research objectives of this Co-operative Agreement shifted toward geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide. In the period September 2006-February 2007, experiments were conducted in a High-Pressure Batch Reactor (HPBR) for creating emulsions of liquid carbon dioxide (/CO₂)-in-water stabilized by fine particles for geologic sequestration of CO₂. Also, emulsions were created in water of a binary mixture of liquid carbon dioxide and liquid hydrogen sulfide (/H₂S), called Acid Gas (AG). This leads to the possibility of safe disposal of AG in deep geologic formations, such as saline aquifers. The stabilizing particles included pulverized limestone (CaCO₃), unprocessed flyash, collected by an electrostatic precipitator at a local coal-fired power plant, and pulverized siderite (FeCO₃). Particle size ranged from submicron to a few micrometers. The first important finding is that /CO₂ and /H₂S freely mix as a binary liquid without phase separation. The next finding is that the mixture of /CO₂ and /H₂S can be emulsified in water using fine particles as emulsifying agents. Such emulsions are stable over prolonged periods, so it should not be a problem to inject an emulsion into subterranean formations. The advantage of injecting an emulsion into subterranean formations is that it is denser than the pure liquid, therefore it is likely to disperse in the bottom of the geologic formation, rather than buoying upward (called fingering). In such a fashion, the risk of the liquids escaping from the formation, and possibly re-emerging into the atmosphere, is minimized. This is especially important for H₂S, because it is a highly toxic gas. Furthermore, the emulsion may interact with the surrounding minerals, causing mineral trapping. This may lead to longer sequestration periods than injecting the pure liquids alone
Follow-up report: Penikese Island School( )

1 edition published in 1992 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A system design utilizing photovoltaic power and battery storage for a refrigerator is reviewed
 
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Radio soundings and plasma physics : 2007 Radio Plasma Imager Science Team Meeting, April 27, 2007 ; Radio Sounding and Plasma Physics Symposium, April 29, 2007 ; XI International Digisonde Forum, April 30-May 3, 2007
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Alternative Names

controlled identityUniversity of Lowell

Massachusetts University of Massachusetts at Lowell

Massachusettsi Ülikool Lowellis

UMass Lowell

UML

Universidad de Massachusetts Lowell

Universidade de Massachusetts Lowell

Universitat de Massachusetts Lowell

Universitato de Masaĉuseco ĉe Lowell

University of Massachusetts, Lowell

University of Massachusetts Lowell College of Arts and Sciences

University of Massachusetts Lowell Office of Research Administration

University of Massachusetts Lowell Office of the Vice Provost for Research

University of Massachusetts (System) University of Massachusetts at Lowell

Πανεπιστήμιο της Μασαχουσέτης στο Λόουελ

جامعة ماساتشوستس في لويل

دانشگاه ماساچوست در لوول

ماساچوست بیلیم‌یوردو، لوول

یونیورسٹی آف میساچوسٹس لوویل

マサチューセッツ大学ローウェル校

马萨诸塞大学洛厄尔分校

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English (47)

French (1)