WorldCat Identities

Ullman, Ellen

Overview
Works: 15 works in 78 publications in 4 languages and 3,583 library holdings
Genres: History  Psychological fiction  Fiction  Biography  Autobiographies  Pictorial works  Anecdotes 
Roles: Author, Narrator
Classifications: PS3621.L45, 813.6
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Ellen Ullman
 
Most widely held works by Ellen Ullman
By blood by Ellen Ullman( Book )

9 editions published between 2012 and 2013 in English and held by 1,028 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"San Francisco in the 1970s. Free love has given way to radical feminism, psychedelic ecstasy to hard-edged gloom. The Zodiac Killer stalks the streets. A disgraced professor takes an office in a downtown tower to plot his return. But the walls are thin and he's distracted by voices from next door--his neighbor is a psychologist, and one of her patients dislikes the hum of the white-noise machine. And so he begins to hear about the patient's troubles with her female lover, her conflicts with her adoptive WASP family, and her quest to track down her birth mother. The professor is not just absorbed but enraptured. And the further he is pulled into the patient's recounting of her dramas--and the most profound questions of her own identity--the more he needs the story to move forward. The patient's questions about her birth family have led her to a Catholic charity that trafficked freshly baptized orphans out of Germany after World War II. But confronted with this new self-- "I have no idea what it means to say 'I'm a Jew'"--The patient finds her search stalled. Armed with the few details he's gleaned, the professor takes up the quest and quickly finds the patient's mother in records from a German displaced-persons camp. But he can't let on that he's been eavesdropping, so he mocks up a reply from an adoption agency the patient has contacted and drops it in the mail. Through the wall, he hears how his dear patient is energized by the news, and so is he. He unearths more clues and invests more and more in this secret, fraught, triangular relationship: himself, the patient, and her therapist, who is herself German. His research leads them deep into the history of displaced-persons camps, of postwar Zionism, and--most troubling of all--of the Nazi Lebensborn program"--
The bug : a novel by Ellen Ullman( Book )

16 editions published between 2003 and 2013 in English and held by 666 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 1984, Roberta Watson, a quality assurance tester with a computer start-up company, and Ethan Levin, a computer programmer, try to find the bug which is infecting their company's new software before it ruins the company and their lives
By blood : a novel by Ellen Ullman( )

14 editions published between 2012 and 2017 in English and held by 280 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

1970s San Francisco. Free love has given way to radical feminism, psychedelic ecstasy to hard-edged gloom. The Zodiac Killer stalks the streets. A disgraced professor takes a downtown office to plot his return. But the walls are thin and he's distracted by voices from next door-his neighbor is a psychologist, and one of her patients dislikes the hum of the white-noise machine. And so he begins to hear about the patient's troubles with her female lover, her conflicts with her adoptive WASP family, and her quest to track down her birth mother. The professor is enraptured. And the further he is pulled into the patient's recounting of her dramas-and the most profound questions of her own identity-the more he needs the story to move forward. The patient's questions about her birth family have led her to a Catholic charity that trafficked freshly baptized orphans out of Germany after World War II. But confronted with this new self- "I have no idea what it means to say 'I'm a Jew'"--The patient finds her search stalled. Armed with the few details he's gleaned, the professor takes up the quest and quickly finds the patient's mother in records from a German displaced-persons camp. But he can't let on that he's been eavesdropping, so he mocks up a reply from an adoption agency the patient has contacted and drops it in the mail. Through the wall, he hears how his dear patient is energized by the news, and so is he. He unearths more clues and invests more and more in this secret, fraught, triangular relationship: himself, the patient, and her therapist, who is herself German. His research leads them deep into the history of displaced-persons camps, of postwar Zionism, and-most troubling of all-of the Nazi Lebensborn program. With ferocious intelligence and an enthralling, magnetic prose, Ellen Ullman weaves a dark and brilliant, intensely personal novel that feels as big and timeless as it is sharp and timely. It is an ambitious work that establishes her as a major writer
Yehudhith by Elliot Ross( Book )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 116 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"From the introduction by Ellen Ullman: 'It is an odd way for a Jewish man to begin a book about the Holocaust: with a quote from Adolf Hitler. But so begins Elliot Ross's collection of photographs, with a picture of woman holding a violin and, facing her, a quote from "Mein Kampf"--Hitler musing (Horribly) about the Jews who had lived in Linz, Austria for centuries, becoming what Hitler calls "Europeanized," taking on "a human look," until, he says, "even I took them for Germans." And, indeed, the woman in Ross's photograph does look German. She is blond, fair-skinned, strong-chinned. The violin and bow she holds are veritable signifiers of high Mittel Europa culture at the turn of the last century. We can imagine her as the daughter of a prosperous burgher of Linz, the city that welcomed Hitler so joyously into its main square, our violin player posing for her portrait just before Herr Professor arrives for her music lesson. If she is a Jewish woman, we, like Hitler, cannot tell; there is nothing of the stereotyped Ashkenazi about her. As we look at her image, we're not certain what to think or feel, except discomfort. Who is she? It is only when we turn the page that we begin to understand the story Ross is about to tell in words and pictures. For the next photograph is an answer to the first, another woman, this one unmistakably Jewish (presumably one whom Hitler considered non-human in appearance.) She is strongly beautiful, almost Classically Semitic, something about her inviting the dangerous phase "beautiful Jewess." Yet we can't enjoy her beauty for long. For the text paired with this image, from the scholar Mary Lowenthal Felstiner, tells us the Nazi view of women "cell-bearers," lowest ranking members of of the low anti race of Jews, despised for having spawned it. Again we hear from Hitler: "Every child that a woman brings into the world is a battle, a battle waged for the existence of her people." And we begin to understand that we are about to get a very particular view of the Holocaust: as a battle over the bodies of women - mothers and potential mothers, as the Nazis saw them the special horrors afforded them as living emblems of the survival of the Jewish people.'"--Vamp & Tramp catalog description
Close to the machine : technophilia and its discontents : a memoir by Ellen Ullman( Book )

8 editions published between 1997 and 2013 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Ullman tries to balance her life, "close to the machine" as a computer programmer with the social and philosophical repercussions of her work
Close to the machine mein Leben mit dem Computer by Ellen Ullman( Book )

2 editions published in 1999 in German and English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Life in code : a personal history of technology by Ellen Ullman( Book )

3 editions published between 2017 and 2018 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The last twenty years have brought us the rise of the internet, the development of artificial intelligence, the ubiquity of once unimaginably powerful computers, and the thorough transformation of our economy and society. Through it all, Ellen Ullman lived and worked inside that rising culture of technology, and in [this book] she tells the continuing story of the changes it wrought with a unique, expert perspective. When Ullman moved to San Francisco in the early 1970s and went on to become a computer programmer, she was joining a small, idealistic, and almost exclusively male cadre that aspired to genuinely change the world. In 1997 Ullman wrote Close to the Machine, the now classic and still definitive account of life as a coder at the birth of what would be a sweeping technological, cultural, and financial revolution. Twenty years later, the story Ullman recounts is neither one of unbridled triumph nor a nostalgic denial of progress. It is necessarily the story of digital technology's loss of innocence as it entered the cultural mainstream, and it is a personal reckoning with all that has changed, and so much that hasn't. [This book] is essential to our understanding of the last twenty years-- and the next twenty."--Jacket
Life in code : a personal history of technology by Ellen Ullman( )

2 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This program is read by the author. The never-more-necessary return of one of our most vital and eloquent voices on technology and culture, the author of the seminal Close to the Machine The last twenty years have brought us the rise of the internet, the development of artificial intelligence, the ubiquity of once unimaginably powerful computers, and the thorough transformation of our economy and society. Through it all, Ellen Ullman lived and worked inside that rising culture of technology, and in Life in Code she tells the continuing story of the changes it wrought with a unique, expert perspective. When Ellen Ullman moved to San Francisco in the early 1970s and went on to become a computer programmer, she was joining a small, idealistic, and almost exclusively male cadre that aspired to genuinely change the world. In 1997 Ullman wrote Close to the Machine, the now classic and still definitive account of life as a coder at the birth of what would be a sweeping technological, cultural, and financial revolution. Twenty years later, the story Ullman recounts is neither one of unbridled triumph nor a nostalgic denial of progress. It is necessarily the story of digital technology's loss of innocence as it entered the cultural mainstream, and it is a personal reckoning with all that has changed, and so much that hasn't. Life in Code is an essential audiobook toward our understanding of the last twenty years-and the next twenty
Lytteren roman by Ellen Ullman( Book )

1 edition published in 2014 in Norwegian and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

San Francisco, 1970. En professor mister jobben og leier et slitent kontor for å finne en måte å løse problemene sine på. I stedet blir han sittende å lytte til det som foregår på psykiaterkontoret som ligger vegg i vegg. Han blir oppslukt av historien til en ung kvinne som er adoptert og på leting etter sitt biologiske opphav. Professoren oppsporer familien til kvinnen, og begynner å sende henne brev med informasjon om dem i adopsjonskontorets navn. Dette er en historie om identitet, tilknytning og et ødeleggende behov for å sette spor i andres liv
Yehudhith : photographs by Elliot Ross, with texts about women and the holocaust by Ellen Ullman( Book )

1 edition published in 2004 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Accanto alla macchina : la mia vita nella Silicon Valley by Ellen Ullman( Book )

1 edition published in 2018 in Italian and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Let the system do the porting by Ellen Ullman( )

1 edition published in 1992 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Client by Ellen Ullman( )

1 edition published in 1993 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

You can't run on everything by Ellen Ullman( )

1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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The bug : a novel
Covers
Close to the machine : technophilia and its discontents : a memoir
Alternative Names
Ellen Ullman American writer

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