WorldCat Identities

Crosse, Andrew 1784-1855

Overview
Works: 27 works in 34 publications in 1 language and 305 library holdings
Genres: Patents 
Roles: Author
Classifications: QC515.C8,
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Andrew Crosse
 
Most widely held works by Andrew Crosse
Memorials, scientific and literary, of Andrew Crosse, the electrician by Andrew Crosse( )
5 editions published between 1857 and 1980 in English and held by 178 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Memorials Scientific and Literary, of Andrew Crosse, the Electrician by Cornelia A. H Crosse( Book )
2 editions published in 1857 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Memorials, scientific and literary by Andrew Crosse( Book )
1 edition published in 1857 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Red-letter Days of my Life : (Crosse) In Two Volumes by Andrew Crosse( Book )
2 editions published in 1892 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Clifton, to Mr. Crosse by Ada King Lovelace( )
1 edition published in 1843 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Letting him know that "circumstances have taken me away from Ashley at present, & that my return is uncertain. I am now with my mother; & I may return perhaps in a fortnight, or it may be longer;" asking what he and his son would like to do with regard to their visit; expressing her disappointment at missing him
Ockham Park, to Mr. Crosse by Ada King Lovelace( )
in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Apologizing for taking so long to reply; saying that she is "in a very musical phase (which you will not be sorry to hear), and I am giving a good deal of time to it;" commenting that his "account & diagram of the apparatus seems promising. Have you yet actually put it into operation:" saying that "Dr. Carpenter will be very much interested in the progress of this renewed experiment. We talk of trying it ourselves now shortly but we find many difficulties & that to test the results with any certainty necessitates a quantity & sort of preparation and of appareil altogether, which only exists in an established laboratory;" It is not yet certain that Dr. Carpenter will permanently remain with us; & this still-existing doubt has made us delay many things we may perhaps do if he does remain;" saying that her health has improved; crediting her improved health to his suggestions when she was at Bromfield; asking if he has heard "any more about Mesmerism? And what are your present opinions upon it? I quite agree with you that your best & ... refuge from all troubles is in your Science. That is a great soother of agitated feelings, & in this respect you are indeed a fortunate person. I generally see indeed that there is compensation of some kind or other, in all situations; & I think lots are very even in this world on the whole;" sending her regards to Mrs. Crosse
Ockham, to Mr. Crosse by Ada King Lovelace( )
in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Discussing, in detail and at length, an experiment she witnessed at Somerledge that appears to have involved a divining rod; referring to the help of Sir James Bathurst to "prevent the possibility of any deception;" adding that she and Lord Lovelace "both tried with the twig over some of the water-courses where the man had succeeded, but neither of us seem to possess the power."
Ashley Combe, to Mr. Crosse by Ada King Lovelace( )
1 edition published in 1844 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Explaining that she has been ill and "just emerging from one of my miserable attacks of Gastritis (Gastric Fever);" telling him that "There is not only much that is akin, in principles & feelings, between our two minds, but there is just that difference & that peculiar adaptation of the differences in our characteristics, which would fit us to be of mutual benefit. The one could supply the deficiencies of the other; & the one could enhance the strong points of the other. I shall therefore by degrees communicate to you the whole of my present views & plans. I have done so to no other scientific person, as yet. I am too well aware what scientific perfidy is capable of, to say the truth. But that thought cannot come into consideration between you & me. On the other hand I know you will equally trust me. I need not say that respecting any thing derived from you, I should glory in acknowledging my debt, if in future writings in discoveries of my own I could point out those links of my chain which should be yours. Depend on it that two heads are better than one, (if they don't quarrel, always understood; & unluckily philosophers generally do quarrel.);" asking if he would send her "some of Corelli's music? I know you like it & perhaps I could pick out parts for the Harp."
Ashley Combe, to Mr. Crosse by Ada King Lovelace( )
1 edition published in 1844 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Explaining that she thinks it best to send him the documents now "& not delay showing them until we meet. I am anxious that we should try the experiments mentioned; & you may require a little preparation possibly for that purpose;" discussing the experiments she would like to undertake and the areas she would like to study; mentioning specifically "an experiment with the muscles of frogs;" expressing the desire "to make a battery described in the 13th No. of the Archives de l'Electricité, p. 160;" adding that she is "anxious to consult him "about the most convenient & manageable & portable forms for obtaining constantly-acting batteries; not great intensity but continual & interrupted action. Some of my own views make it necessary for me to use electricity as my prime-minister, in order to test certain points experimentally as to the nature & putting-together (con-sti-tu-tion) of the molecules of matter. It is therefore a great object to me to get effective & ever-ready electrical agents at my disposal; & to become skilful in manipulating with these. By eventually bringing high Analysis to bear on my experimental studies, I hope one day to do much!"
Red-letter Days of my Life : (Crosse) In Two Volumes by Andrew Crosse( Book )
1 edition published in 1892 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Richard Owen papers by Richard Owen( )
in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
ALS. Owen sends a report on a lecture on New Zealand birds to a Miss Bailey and wishes a Mr. Pearson professional success in Lancaster. The electrician Andrew Crosse writes to Owen of the discovery of insects in metallic solutions supposed to be destructive to organic life
Ashley-Combe, to Mr. Crosse by Ada King Lovelace( )
1 edition published in 1842 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Asking him to send her "accounts of the old experiments, & the more recent ones as well. All is well as usual here. I play as much, perhaps more, than ever; & really do get on gloriously. You know that I believe no creature ever could will things like a Byron. And perhaps that is at the bottom of the genius-like tendencies in my family. We can throw our whole life & existence for the time-being into whatever we will to do & accomplish. You know perhaps the family motto "Crede Byron"! I think not inappropriate; & especially when united to that of the King's "Labor ipse voluptas". Now as I have married that motto, both literally, & in my whole ideas & nature, I mean to do what I mean to do!;" reminding him that his son promised to visit them in Surrey
[Poem about death.] by Andrew Crosse( )
1 edition published in 1838 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Ashley Combe, to Mr. Crosse by Ada King Lovelace( )
1 edition published in 1844 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Explaining that she might have to postpone his visit as she is "going on in all the wrong way, I am sorry to say. Last night in the middle of the night, I had a seizure of Angina Pectoris & I am so knocked to pieces that I doubt much if I can put my plans in execution at the time fixed. At the same time, I often alter very rapidly; & become quite myself & well even in a very few hours;" adding "It is mortal agony, for the time-being.--I have it occasionally."
Specification of Andrew Crosse : extracting metals from ores by Great Britain( Book )
1 edition published in 1857 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Ashley-Combe, to Mr. Crosse by Ada King Lovelace( )
1 edition published in 1843 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Saying she has sent him a "copy of the paper I lately published in Taylor's Scientific Memoirs;" commenting that she has "lived almost entirely secluded. Those who are in earnest & with single mind devoted to any great object in life, must find this occasionally inevitable; & when (as has been my case during the last 10 months), family affairs of a harassing & complicated description, & also very strange & uncertain states of health, are superadded to the first cause, you will not wonder at having heard nothing from me, because you have experience & candor enough to perceive & know that God has not given to us (in this state of existence) more than very limited powers of physical inter-communication & expression of one's ideas & feeling. Would that every thought of mine could be father to the expression of it, to the communication of it to other sentient & thinking beings!;" asking if he can visit and telling him that Mr. Babbage is "likely to be here at the time I mention;" adding that she will "be very desirous of again seeing you. You know what that means from me, & that it is no [illegible] or humbug, but the simple expression & result of the respect & attraction I feel for a mind that ventures to read direct in God's own book, & not merely thro' man's translation of that same vast & mighty work."
Ashley-Combe, to Mr. Crosse by Ada King Lovelace( )
1 edition published in 1844 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Thanking him for his note and discussing logistics for a visit and a reciprocal visit by her to Bromfield. Discussing, at length and in detail, her passion for Science; saying "...I am more than ever now the Bride of Science. Religion to me is Science, & Science is Religion. In that deeply felt truth, lies the secret of my intense devotion to the reading of God's natural works. It is reading Him, His Will, His Intelligence: & [illegible] again is learning to obey & to follow (to the best of our power) that Will! For he who reads, who interprets the Divinity with a true & simple heart then obeys & submits in acts & feelings as by an impulse & instructs. He can't help doing so. At least so it appears to me;" And when I behold the scientific, & so-called philosophers, full of selfish feelings & of the tendency to war against circumstances & Providence, I say to myself: They are not true priests. They are but half-prophets, if not absolutely false ones. They have read the great page simply with the physical eye, & with none of the spirit within. The intellectual, the moral, the religious, seem to me all naturally bound up & inter-linked together in one great & harmonious whole; and I hope to live to demonstrate this to mankind more forcibly than I think it is as yet felt in the world;" continuing, at length and in detail, to discuss the relationship between religion and science; concluding with a lengthy discussion of her "dreadful physical sufferings" that relate "chiefly with the digestive functions, of no common degree & kind. This has nothing to do with a weakly constitution, & in fact it appears to me to be the result of the fine-ness & intensity & power of my nervous system. So that in truth, my illness -- my weakness - is the result of my strength;" describing what her physical sufferings have taught her; thanking him for his understanding and telling him "How pleasant is it always to communicate with one who like you can understand what one says & feels, whether he agrees with it or not!"
Ashley Combe, to Mr. Crosse by William King-Noel Lovelace( )
in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Saying that due to various circumstances they need to reschedule their visit to him; proposing they arrive on Saturday the 30th and stay until Monday the 2nd of December
Letters by Andrew Crosse( )
in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Two A.L.S. (undated, and 1842 Aug. 25), the former making a dinner appointment with Buckland, the latter recounting Crosse's theory of batteries creating organic life
Letter by William Buckland( )
in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Five A.L.S. to various correspondents including Ransom and Crosse, and an envelope
 
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Audience level: 0.70 (from 0.00 for Crosse con ... to 1.00 for Memorials, ...)
Languages
English (32)