WorldCat Identities

Hedley, Steve

Overview
Works: 20 works in 105 publications in 1 language and 1,336 library holdings
Genres: Trials, litigation, etc 
Roles: Author, Editor, Other
Classifications: KD1949, 346.4203
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Steve Hedley
Tort by Steve Hedley( Book )

34 editions published between 1998 and 2011 in English and Undetermined and held by 525 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The 'Core Text Series' provides students with books which cover the core of a particular subject without over-simplifying and in a way that is accessible. This particular volume in the series looks at the law of tort
Blackstone's statutes [on] IT & e-commerce( Book )

16 editions published between 2002 and 2012 in English and held by 182 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This new edition of Statutes on IT and e-Commerce has been fully revised and updated to include all relevant legislation through to June 2004." "New to the second edition: an Electronic Commerce (EC directive) regulations 2002; Electronic Signatures Regulations 2002; Privacy and Electronic Communications (EC Directive) Regulations 2003; and UNCITRAL Model Laws on Electronic Commerce and Electronic Signatures."--Jacket
The law of electronic commerce and the Internet in the UK and Ireland by Steve Hedley( Book )

11 editions published between 2006 and 2017 in English and held by 177 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This text covers the law applicable to commercial use of the Internet and other modern communication technologies. It considers not only web-based trading methods but also the use of the Internet in more conventional trading, and is written from an Anglo-Irish perspective
Restitution : its division and ordering by Steve Hedley( Book )

8 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 140 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A critical introduction to restitution by Steve Hedley( Book )

8 editions published between 2001 and 2005 in English and held by 89 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This text on restitution is an introductory text which places this area of law and academic debates firmly in their commercial context. It offers an accessible guide to the subject, and is specially designed with undergraduates in mind
The law of restitution( Book )

5 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 75 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Contract, tort and restitution by Steve Hedley( Book )

5 editions published between 1999 and 2002 in English and held by 52 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Tort by Steve Hedley( Book )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 40 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

IT & e-commerce( Book )

3 editions published between 2006 and 2008 in English and held by 39 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This volume contains the main statutory provisions regulating the use of IT, whether by business, governmental departments or individuals. The main focus is on statutes but it also includes statutory instruments, including instruments setting out the details of data protection law. EU directives are included
The law of electronic commerce in the UK and Ireland by Steve Hedley( Book )

3 editions published between 2005 and 2006 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Restitution : modern legal studies by Steve Hedley( Book )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Making sense of negligence( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : What is negligence? Our answers to this are frequently misleading, because we turn all our attention on to what doctrine says rather than asking how it is actually used. So we routinely talk of personal liability, even though we know very well that individuals (as opposed to organisations, typically insurers) do not pay damages. We think of negligence doctrine as if it were applied automatically and without bias, when in fact the complex insurance arrangements involved have rather decided biases. And we treat the development of the law purely as a matter of evolving judicial thought, when in fact legislatures and insurers also routinely modify the system in response to new realities. The result is that fundamental change has occurred under the very noses of theorists, who still tell us that negligence holds individual defendants responsible for their wrongdoing (it does not) or that the economic effect of tort rules is to deter defendants (there is not much reason to think this is so). Why are the leading theoretical justifications of negligence - corrective justice, responsibility theory and economic theory - so dependent on myths? Is it because the myths do not matter? Or is it that, in fact, we have no good justification for the system as it works in practice at all - we have no good theory of why negligence makes sense because it does not, in reality, make sense?
How has the Common Law survived the 20th Century? by Steve Hedley( )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Making sense of negligence( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : What is negligence? Our answers to this are frequently misleading, because we turn all our attention on to what doctrine says rather than asking how it is actually used. So we routinely talk of personal liability, even though we know very well that individuals (as opposed to organisations, typically insurers) do not pay damages. We think of negligence doctrine as if it were applied automatically and without bias, when in fact the complex insurance arrangements involved have rather decided biases. And we treat the development of the law purely as a matter of evolving judicial thought, when in fact legislatures and insurers also routinely modify the system in response to new realities. The result is that fundamental change has occurred under the very noses of theorists, who still tell us that negligence holds individual defendants responsible for their wrongdoing (it does not) or that the economic effect of tort rules is to deter defendants (there is not much reason to think this is so). Why are the leading theoretical justifications of negligence - corrective justice, responsibility theory and economic theory - so dependent on myths? Is it because the myths do not matter? Or is it that, in fact, we have no good justification for the system as it works in practice at all - we have no good theory of why negligence makes sense because it does not, in reality, make sense?
Restitution : contract's twin? by Steve Hedley( )

1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Tort by Steve Hedley( Book )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Looking outward or looking inward? Obligations scholarship in the early 21st century by Steve Hedley( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Tort and Personal Injuries 1850 to the Present by Steve Hedley( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The shock of the old: interpretivism in obligations by Steve Hedley( )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Is private law meaningless? by Steve Hedley( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Audience Level
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Audience level: 0.60 (from 0.44 for Tort / ... to 1.00 for Restitutio ...)

The law of electronic commerce and the Internet in the UK and Ireland The law of electronic commerce in the UK and Ireland
Covers
Blackstone's statutes [on] IT & e-commerceThe law of electronic commerce and the Internet in the UK and IrelandContract, tort and restitutionIT & e-commerceThe law of electronic commerce in the UK and Ireland
Languages
English (104)