WorldCat Identities

Ehlers, Valerie Janet 1948-

Overview
Works: 29 works in 34 publications in 1 language and 116 library holdings
Genres: Academic theses 
Roles: Author
Classifications: RA440.8, 613.071
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Valerie Janet Ehlers
Teaching aspects of health care( Book )

2 editions published between 1998 and 2002 in English and held by 73 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The feasability of implementing community based care for moderately mentally-retarded persons in a specific centre in Port Elizabeth by Nosipho Margaret Ngcanga( )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility of implementing community based care for moderately mentally retarded persons in a specific centre in the Port Elizabeth area. The objectives of the study were to identify • the needs of the moderately mentally retarded children. • the physical, psychosocial and vocational rehabilitation means of meeting these needs. • how involved the communities, parents and government were in the care of moderately mentally retarded children. A quantitative, exploratmy and descriptive design was used. A sample of 50 moderately mentally retarded children was utilised. Data were collected by means of questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. The major research findings indicate that community care for MMRPs could only be feasible with sufficient resources, expertise and community involvement. All these aspects appeared to be lacking in the centre where this research was conducted raising questions as to benefits which the mentally retarded children and their parents and the community could derive from these services. However recommendations were made on identified shortcomings, problems and needs
Factors influencing young people's preventive actions against human immunodeficiency virus infections in Tanzania by Evelyne Neema Assenga( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study identified factors influencing the practice of HIV prevention behaviours amongst Tanzania youths. Structured interviews with in-school youths (n=222) and out-of school youths (n=150); and focus groups discussions with 25 youths were conducted to collect data. Although the level of HIV/AIDS awareness was 97.6% and 58.5% of the youths had positive attitudes towards HIV prevention, only 50.8% practised at least one mode of HIV prevention. Factors which promoted HIV prevention practices included positive attitudes towards specific preventive behaviours and the individual’s self-efficacy to enact such behaviours. The barriers against the practice of HIV prevention behaviours included the lack of comprehensive knowledge about HIV/AIDS and HIV prevention, socio-economic issues such as unemployment, influx of mobile populations, loss of cultural values, negative social norms, peer pressure, alcohol abuse and the lack of adequate HIV preventive services
Antenatal mothers' practices for preventing mother-to-child HIV transmission by C Chivonivoni( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Professional educational needs of non-practising nurses registered with the South African Nursing Council by Valerie Janet Ehlers( Book )

4 editions published in 1990 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Professional role expectations of nursing students in the Transvaal by Valerie Janet Ehlers( )

2 editions published between 1984 and 1985 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Hyperfine-structure measurements on Dy161 and Dy163 by W Ebenhöh( )

1 edition published in 1967 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Factors that influence pregnant women’s utilisation of anti-malaria services in the Buikwe district of Uganda by Richard Serunkuma Bbosa( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Malaria is endemic throughout Uganda and the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Malaria causes complications in 80.0% of all pregnancies in Uganda. This study attempted to identify factors that influence pregnant women’s utilisation of anti-malaria services in the Buikwe district of Uganda. These factors were contextualised within the Social Learning Theory’s major concepts. The target populations comprised pregnant women attending antenatal clinics (phase 1) and midwives providing antenatal services (phase 2) at 16 clinics in the Buikwe district of Uganda during the data collection phase of the study. Structured interviews were conducted with a sample of 400 randomly selected pregnant women and with the accessible population of 40 midwives. Pregnant women, who had progressed beyond primary school level education, were more likely to take intermittent preventive treatment (IPT) drugs and to use long lasting insecticide treated nets (LLINs) to prevent malaria. Pregnant women were more likely to implement malaria-preventive actions if they lived within five kilometres of clinics, were satisfied with available health services, were knowledgeable about the malaria preventive measures and had used IPT during previous pregnancies. Pregnant women who implemented one malaria-preventive action were likely to implement other actions as well (Pearson’s correlation coefficient was 0.65; p<0.05). Midwives’ provision of malaria-preventive services to pregnant women were influenced by the availability of IPT drugs, accessibility of safe drinking water, frequency of giving health education to pregnant women, cooperation with village health teams, malaria-related in-service training, midwives’ education level and experience. Although 97.9% of the pregnant women had taken IPT and 84.2% of those who had received LLINs, utilised these nets, malaria prevention during pregnancy could be improved. All pregnant women should attend antenatal clinics at least four times during each pr
Factors contributing to adolescent mothers' non-utilization of contraceptives in the Piet Retief area by D. E Mbambo( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This study investigated factors contributing to adolescent mothers' non-utilisation of contraceptives in the Piet Retief (Mkhondo) area. Contraceptives, emergency contraceptives and termination of pregnancy services are available free of charge. Nevertheless the number of adolescent mothers continues to increase in this area. Structured questionnaires were completed by 107 adolescent mothers. Most respondents (70,0%) received no sex education prior to their pregnancies, and were not knowledgeable about contraceptives. Subsequent to the birth of their babies, only 59,81% used contraceptives, risking further pregnancies. Adolescents, from the age of 12, should receive sex education. Availability of contraceptives during weekends could help adolescents to postpone their pregnancies. Health education should be given to the mothers in the Piet Retief (Mkhondo) area so that they can provide more effective sex education (including contraception) to their daughters
NUCLEAR SPIN OF GALLIUM-70 by Valerie Janet Ehlers( )

1 edition published in 1961 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Intentions to use cervical cancer screening services among women aged 42 and older in Malawi by Melanie Yandakale Hami( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Free cervical cancer screening services are provided in Malawi’s public healthcare institutionssince 1999. Few women aged 42 and older, utilise these services. Cervical cancer continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality among this group of women. Structured interviews were conducted with 381 women who attended three healthcare centers in Blantyre and semi-structured interviews with 14 nurse/midwives working at the same centers. The results for both phases arepresented within the Health Belief Model’s constructs. Phase 1 revealed that women had low levels of perceived susceptibility to cervical cancer. Although the interviewed women perceived cervical cancer to be a serious condition, they did not regard themselves to be at risk of suffering from cervical cancer. Knowledge that cervical cancer screening could detect this cancer at an early stage, embarrassment, stigma, social support, financial costs, traditional practices and available sources of information, influenced women’s intentions to be screened for cervical cancer. In phase 2, the nurse/midwives indicated that Malawian women lacked information about cervical cancer, available screening tests and the purpose of such screening.These women perceived cervical canceras being incurable and linked to witchcraft. Women’s utilisation of cervical screening services was hampered by barriers relating to healthcare institutions, women themselves and nurse/midwives. Local radio and television broadcasts, friends and nurse/midwives motivated individual women to use these screening services.Women preferred receiving information about cervical cancer screening during community activities. Health education should be intensified, nurse/midwives should be more empathetic, clinic days and hours should be extended. Misconceptions should be addressed and more service providers should be trained. This would enable more Malawian women to use cervical screening services, enhancing early detection and treatment of cervic
Midwives' provision of antimalaria services to pregnant women in Uganda( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Objectives: malaria causes complications during 80% of all pregnancies in Uganda. However, only 48% of Ugandan pregnant women took one dose of intermittent preventive therapy while merely 27% took the second dose during 2011. This study investigated midwives' provision of anti-malaria services in the Buikwe District of Uganda. Design: a quantitative exploratory descriptive design was used. Setting: prenatal clinics (n =16) in the Buikwe District of Uganda Respondents: questionnaires were completed by 40 (out of a population of 45) midwives. Findings: midwives' provision of malaria-preventive services to pregnant women were associated with the midwives' education level and professional experience as well as by the availability of safe drinking water and drugs for intermittent preventive treatment. Midwives who provided frequent health education to pregnant women, cooperated with village health team members and received in-service training were likely to provide effective anti-malaria services to pregnant women. Key conclusions: regular audits of midwives' records should identify strengths and weaknesses related to the prevention of malaria during pregnancy. Relevant in- service education should be provided. Drugs for intermittent preventive therapy and clean drinking water must be available at all prenatal clinics so that pregnant women can take these drugs under direct observation of the midwives. Implications for practice: malaria-related health education should be provided during every prenatal clinic visit, and every pregnant women should take two doses of intermittent preventive therapy drugs during every pregnancy (as prescribed by Uganda's Ministry of Health) in order to reduce the reported impact of malaria on 80% of pregnancies in Uganda. Highlights: Malaria complicates 80% of pregnancies in Uganda but midwives could help to reduce this prevalence. For midwives to provide medicines for preventing malaria, regular supplies of medicines, clean drinking water and cooperation with village health teams are required. Midwives' regular malaria-related in-service education is essential
Tuberculosis case detection among HIV positive persons in a hospital in Ethiopia by Tedla Mezemir Damte( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Collaborative TB/HIV management is essential to prevent and treat TB among HIV-positive TB patients, and to ensure that HIV-positive TB patients are detected and treated appropriately. This quantitative, descriptive, contextual study identified problems encountered during the implementation of TB case detection among HIV-positive individuals in one Ethiopian hospital. During December 2012, 300 checklists were completed about HIV-positive patients’ TB/HIV collaborative management, as reflected in their files. Only 60.2% of HIV-positive patients, who should have received Isoniazid preventive treatment (IPT), were placed on this treatment. X-rays and laboratory examinations of sputum samples were not done according to the Ethiopian guidelines. Most TB patients’ initial screening was done by nurses, not doctors, and included only symptom screening without CD4 count considerations. Managers and healthcare personnel should improve IPT, especially for those with early HIV infection and timely effective treatment for those suffering from TB, before complications arise
Factors influencing treatment adherence among adult patients receiving antiretroviral therapy at Extension 15 clinic, Gaborone, Botswana by Nnamdi Obioma Ndubuka( )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This study analysed data obtained from respondents and their medical records to determine the barriers and motivators for good adherence to ART. Respondents' records were also reviewed together with their pharmacy refill records to identify any correlation between .CD4 cell counts, viral load, VL and adherence to antiretroviral drugs at extension 15 ARV clinic in Gaborone, Botswana. The study investigated whether the combination of pharmacy refills and pill counts adherence measurement methodologies could predict immunological recovery and virologic response through increased CD4 cell counts and suppressed VL. . There was a positive relationship between adherence, CD4 cell counts and VL. Pharmacy refills and pill counts adherence measurement methodologies scored high on sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive values but low on negative predictive values
The utilisation of contraceptives by women who requested termination of pregnancy services in the Gert Sibande District (Mpumalanga) by An Mbokane( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Contraceptives are available free of charge throughout South Africa. Nevertheless the number of requests for termination of pregnancy (TOP) services continues to increase. This research investigated challenges preventing women from using contraceptives effectively. Structured interviews were conducted with 47 women who requested TOP services. Gender and financial issues posed challenges for some women to access contraceptives as well as their reported inability to access contraceptives. Most (85,5%) of the respondents used contraceptives. They discontinued using contraceptives because they experienced side-effects, necessitating them to request TOPs. Knowledge about, access to, nor the actual use of contraceptive enabled these women to prevent unwanted pregnancies. More effective counselling about the side-effects of contraceptives and enhanced accessibility of contraceptives during weekends and lunch breaks could enable more women to prevent unwanted pregnancies and reduce the number of requests for TOPs in the Gert Sibande District (Mpumalanga)
Nigerian health workers' views concerning paediatric adherence to anti-retroviral therapy by Robert Joseph Chiegil( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This study sought to explore the views of healthcare workers regarding paediatric anti-retroviral therapy (ART) adherence in Nigeria. An exploratory descriptive qualitative research design was used to identify and describe healthcare workers’ views in Kano and Lagos, Nigeria. Three focus group discussions were held. The transcribed data was analysed using the framework approach of data analysis. Healthcare providers perceived poverty, illiteracy, stigma and discrimination, inappropriate care approaches, and parental dynamics as factors influencing ART adherence. Recommendations for enhancing paediatric ART adherence levels in Nigeria included: mainstreaming adherence counselling in paediatric ART and adopting a comprehensive family centred care approach were identified as measures for improving paediatric ART adherence. Other measures included free ART services, quality improvement in paediatric ART services, parental empowerment and stigma and discrimination reduction programmes
The novice nurse educator's lecture room instructional management competence by Maria Dürrheim( )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The lecture room instructional management competence of novice nurse educators (NNEs) in the Republic of South Africa (RSA) was investigated. No comprehensive set of generic roles, outcomes and competences for instructional management of nurse educators could be traced in the literature, therefore an analytical study was undertaken. Adhering to the principles for outcomes-based education, three models were established: Q a model for the professional development of nurse educators Q an Education, Training and Development nurse practitioner model, consisting of roles and outcomes for lecture room instructional management Q a model for lecture room instructional management that served as evaluation criteria used in the instrument during the quantitative survey These models were presented to, and evaluated by nurse educators of five universities. The influence of mentorship, reality shock, and professional development on the NNEs' lecture room competence was investigated. The target group consisted of NNEs, their mentors and students in nursing schools in the RSA. A number of respondents were also interviewed and observed. The analysed data indicated that NNEs were not competent when they started teaching, and needed support and supervision from mentors. Findings also indicated the positive influence of mentorship and professional development on competence acquisition. NNEs experienced reality shock requiring support to acquire competence. These aspects justify further research. The recommendations based on this study include that nursing schools use specific evaluation criteria for le<,1ure room competence and for in-service training of NNEs and mentors. Nursing schools should take a more active role in mentoring programmes
The competencies of newly qualified nurses as viewed by senior professional nurses by Lunic Base Khoza( )

1 edition published in 1996 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Descriptive surveys were employed to investigate the competencies of newly qualified nurses (NQNs) as viewed by senior professional nurses (SPNs). The study used questionnaires for collecting data. Questionnaires were delivered by the researcher and also collected by the researcher after completion. SPNs working at thirteen hospitals, that is, six in the former Gazankulu, three in the fonner Venda, and four in the form.er Lebowa health services (falling within the Northern Province of the RSA since April 1994) constituted the subjects of this study. Scientific sampling techniques were not employed as the total population of 396 SPNs was studied. This study obtained responses from 259 SPNs. Findings indicated that specific cognitive, affective and psychomotor competencies were expected ofNQNs upon entering the work setting, as perceived by SPNs. NQNs were perceived to be competent in performing numerous, but not all, clinical competencies which were outlined in the four groups' questionnaires. Application of stages of the nursing process (problem solving and clinical judgement), research, management and administration of a clinical unit, nursing ethics and critical care were perceived by the SPNs to be the central focus ofNQNs' incompetency in all four clinical nursing units, namely community, psychiatric, midwifery and general units. Nevertheless, SPNs were aware that they should provide guidance and support to NQNs. An attempt to elicit SPNs' views on the competencies NQNs should have in the practical situation, could benefit NQNs at grassroots level. Such information could provide curriculum developers with realistic input which would assist in the delineation and refinement of the professional competencies expected of nurses trained in the comprehensive course leading to registration as a nurse (general, psychiatric, and community) and midwife. The identified competencies could improve the quality of care and the nursing standards if they could be mastered by NQN
Personal factors influencing patients' anti-retroviral treatment adherence in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia by Tefera Girma Negash( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This study attempted to identify personal (patient-related) factors influencing anti-retroviral therapy (ART) adherence in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. A quantitative, descriptive, cross-sectional and analytical design was used. Structured interviews were conducted with 355 ART patients. The findings revealed that stigma, discrimination, depression and alcohol use negatively affected patients’ ART adherence levels. However, patients’ knowledge levels had no influence on their ART adherence levels, contrary to other researchers’ reports. Addressing stigma and discrimination at community levels might enhance patients’ abilities to take their medications in the presence of others. Healthcare professionals should be enabled to diagnose and treat depression among ART patients during the early stages. Non-adherent ART patients should be counseled about possible alcohol abuse
The perceptions/views of nursing students, nurse educators and unit supervisors on accompaniment of nursing students in the clinical setting by Esther Masamo Lekhuleni( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The purpose of this study was to describe the perceptions/views of student nurses, nurse educators and unit supervisors on accompaniment of student nurses in clinical settings of the Northern Province of the RSA A quantitative descriptive cross-sectional survey was used in this study to describe the perceptions/views of student nurses, nurse educators and unit supervisors on apcompaniment of student nurses in clinical settings. Data was collected during February and March 200 I when student nurses, nurse educators and unit supervisors in the Northern Province completed questionnaires. The study revealed positive and negative perceptions regarding accompaniment of student nurses in clinical settings, including that: • accompaniment in the clinical settings enhanced student nurses' clinical learning experiences • the presence of nurse educators in the clinical settings improved student nurses' accompaniment • facilitators played an important role in the accompaniment of student nurses • accompaniment enhances correlation of theory and practice
 
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Teaching aspects of health care
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English (24)