WorldCat Identities

Norton, Michael I. 1975-

Overview
Works: 80 works in 146 publications in 6 languages and 1,647 library holdings
Genres: Documentary films  Nonfiction films  Independent films  Handbooks and manuals  Popular works 
Roles: Editor, Author, Other, edc
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Michael I Norton
 
Most widely held works by Michael I Norton
Happy money : the science of smarter spending by Elizabeth Dunn( Book )

31 editions published between 2013 and 2014 in 5 languages and held by 1,033 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Happy Money offers a tour of new research on the science of spending. Most people recognize that they need professional advice on how to earn, save, and invest their money, most people just follow their intuitions. But scientific research shows that those institutions are often wrong. Happy Money explains why you can get more happiness for your money by following five principles, from choosing experiences over stuff to spending money on others. And the five principles, from choosing experiences over stuff to spending money on others. And the five principles can be used not only by individuals but by companies seeking to create happier employees and provide "happier products" to their customers. Elizabeth Dunn and Michael Norton show how companies form Google to Pepsi to Crate & Barrel have put these ideas into action. Along the way, the authors describe new research that reveals that luxury cars often provide no more pleasure than economy models, that commercials can actually enhance the enjoyment of watching television, and that residents of many cities frequently miss out on inexpensive pleasures in their hometowns. By the end of this book, readers will ask themselves one simple question whenever they reach for their wallets. Am i getting the biggest happiness bang for my buck?
The Cambridge handbook of consumer psychology by Michael I Norton( Book )

18 editions published between 2015 and 2017 in English and Undetermined and held by 249 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Why do consumers make the purchases they do, and which ones make them truly happy? Why are consumers willing to spend huge sums of money to appear high status? This handbook addresses these key questions and many more. It provides a comprehensive overview of consumer psychology, examining cutting-edge research at the individual, interpersonal, and societal levels. Leading scholars summarize past and current findings and consider future lines of inquiry to deepen our understanding of the psychology behind consumers' decision making, their interactions with other consumers, and the effects of societal factors on consumption. The Cambridge Handbook of Consumer Psychology will act as a valuable guide for faculty as well as graduate and undergraduate students in psychology, marketing, management, sociology, and anthropology
(Dis)honesty : the truth about lies( Visual )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 209 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An exploration of the complex impact dishonesty has on our lives and everyday society
Community by Michael I Norton( Book )

1 edition published in 1977 in English and held by 33 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The new science of smarter spending by Elizabeth Dunn( Book )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 16 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Money often fails to buy happiness - but not because it can't. It fails because people aren't spending it right. In an attempt to chase contentment, cash is splashed on ever-grander homes and ever more complicated smartphones. The problem is new studies show that this strategy is completely wrong. Here, the authors present a practical guide that will help everyone - from the budgeting family to business and charity leaders. They reveal why you should buy experiences rather than material goods, turn regular buys into rare treats
Hua qian dai lai de xing fu gan by George H Dunne( Book )

4 editions published between 2013 and 2014 in 3 languages and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Most people recognize that they need professional advice on how to earn, save, and invest their money. When it comes to spending that money, most people just follow their intuitions. But scientific research shows that those intuitions are often wrong. Happy Money offers a tour of research on the science of spending, explaining how you can get more happiness for your money. Authors Elizabeth Dunn and Michael Norton have outlined five principles--from choosing experiences over stuff to spending money on others--to guide not only individuals looking for financial security, but also companies seeking to create happier employees and provide "happier products" to their customers. Dunn and Norton show how companies from Google to Pepsi to Charmin have put these ideas into action
"Last-place aversion" : evidence and redistributive implications by Ilyana Kuziemko( )

3 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Why do low-income individuals often oppose redistribution? We hypothesize that an aversion to being in "last place" undercuts support for redistribution, with low-income individuals punishing those slightly below themselves to keep someone "beneath" them. In laboratory experiments, we find support for "last-place aversion" in the contexts of risk aversion and redistributive preferences. Participants choose gambles with the potential to move them out of last place that they reject when randomly placed in other parts of the distribution. Similarly, in money- transfer games, those randomly placed in second-to-last place are the least likely to costlessly give money to the player one rank below. Last-place aversion predicts that those earning just above the minimum wage will be most likely to oppose minimum-wage increases as they would no longer have a lower-wage group beneath them, a prediction we confirm using survey data
Surfacing the submerged state : operational transparency increases trust in and engagement with government by Ryan W Buell( )

5 editions published between 2016 and 2018 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

As Americans' trust in government nears historic lows, frustration with government performance approaches record highs. We propose that Americans’ views of government can be reshaped by increasing government’s operational transparency--that is, the extent to which citizens can see the often-hidden work that government performs. Across three studies using laboratory and field data, increasing operational transparency improves citizens’ views of and increases engagement with government. In Study 1 (N=554), viewing a five-minute computer simulation highlighting the work performed by the government of an archetypal American town--from building roads to ensuring food safety--increased trust in government and support for government services. In Study 2 (N=125), Boston residents who interacted with a website that visualizes both citizens’ service requests--such as potholes and broken streetlamps--and efforts by city government to address them became more trusting and supportive of government. Study 3 (N=21,986) was a natural experiment using data from a mobile phone application through which Boston residents submit service requests to their city government. Users who viewed photos of the city workers responding to their service requests were more likely to continue using the app over the ensuing 13 months, demonstrating that operational transparency led to sustained engagement with government
How elastic are preferences for redistribution? : evidence from randomized survey experiments by Ilyana Kuziemko( Book )

3 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper analyzes the effects of information about inequality and taxes on preferences for redistribution using randomized online surveys on Amazon Mechanical Turk (mTurk). About 5,000 respondents were randomized into treatments providing interactive information on U.S. income inequality, the link between top income tax rates and economic growth, and the estate tax. We find that the informational treatment has very large effects on whether respondents view inequality as an important problem. By contrast, we find quantitatively small effects of the treatment on views about policy and redistribution: support for taxing the rich increases slightly, support for transfers to the poor does not, especially among those with lower incomes and education. An exception is the estate tax we find that informing respondents that it affects only the very richest families has an extremely large positive effect on estate tax support, even increasing respondents' willingness to write to their U.S. senator about the issue. We also find that the treatment substantially decreases trust in government, potentially mitigating respondents' willingness to translate concerns about inequality into government action. Methodologically, we explore different strategies to lower attrition in online survey platforms and show our main results are robust across methods. A small follow-up survey one month later reveals that our results persist over time. Finally, we compare mTurk with other survey vendors and provide suggestions to future researchers considering this platform
Prosocial spending and well-being : cross-cultural evidence for a psychological universal by Lara B Aknin( )

3 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Abstract: This research provides the first support for a possible psychological universal: human beings around the world derive emotional benefits from using their financial resources to help others (prosocial spending). Analyzing survey data from 136 countries, we show that prosocial spending is consistently associated with greater happiness. To test for causality, we conduct experiments within two very different countries (Canada and Uganda) and show that spending money on others has a consistent, causal impact on happiness. In contrast to traditional economic thoughtâ?"which places self-interest as the guiding principle of human motivationâ?"our findings suggest that the reward experienced from helping others may be deeply ingrained in human nature, emerging in diverse cultural and economic contexts
Community by Michael I Norton( Book )

1 edition published in 1977 in Undetermined and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Moral casuistry and the justification of biased judgement by Michael I Norton( )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Humblebragging : a distinct -- and ineffective -- self-presentation strategy by Ovul Sezer( )

2 editions published between 2015 and 2017 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Humblebragging--bragging masked by a complaint--is a distinct and, given the rise of social media, increasingly ubiquitous form of self-promotion. We show that although people often choose to humblebrag when motivated to make a good impression, it is an ineffective self-promotional strategy. Five studies offer both correlational and causal evidence that humblebragging has both global costs--reducing liking and perceived sincerity--and specific costs: it is even ineffective in signaling the specific trait that a person wants to promote. Moreover, humblebragging is less effective than simply complaining, because complainers are at least seen as sincere. Despite people's belief that combining bragging and complaining confers the benefits of both self-promotion strategies, humblebragging fails to pay off
"I read Playboy for the articles" : justifying and rationalizing questionable preferences by Zoë Chance( Book )

2 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

We first describe two means by which individuals rationalize and justify questionable behavior, one which focuses on preemptive actions people take before engaging in such behavior and one which focuses on concurrent strategies, examining how people restructure situations such that their behavior seems less questionable. We conclude by briefly reviewing two additional strategies for coping with such difficult situations: either by forgoing making decisions, or forgetting one's decisions altogether
The persuasive appeal of stigma by Michael I Norton( Book )

2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Stigmatized minorities may have an advantage in persuading majority group members during some face-to-face interactions due to the greater self-presentational demands such interactions elicit. In contrast to models which predict greater persuasive impact of members of ingroups, White participants were more convinced by persuasive appeals delivered by a Black interaction partner than by a White interaction partner. When interacting with a Black partner, Whites engaged in greater self-presentation, which in turn made them more susceptible to their partner's persuasive appeal (Studies 1 and 2). This persuasive benefit of stigma was eliminated when participants were exposed to the same partners making the same arguments on video, decreasing self-presentational demands (Study 2). We conclude by discussing when stigma is likely to facilitate versus impair persuasion
Quan qiu chou kuan shou ce : NGO ji she qu zu zhi zi yuan dong yuan zhi nan = The worldwide fundraiser's handbook by Michael I Norton( Book )

1 edition published in 2005 in Chinese and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Ben shu gu li ren men qu xun zhao cheng gong chou kuan de ji hui. Nei rong bao kuo:chou kuan zhun bei, Chou kuan zhan lüe, Chou kuan zi yuan, Chuang shou, Chou kuan fang fa, He zuo, Gou tong ji qiao deng
The belief in a favorable future by Todd Rogers( )

2 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

People believe that future others’ preferences and beliefs will change to align with their own. People holding a particular view (e.g., support of President Trump) are more likely to believe that future others will share their view than to believe that future others will have an opposing view (e.g., opposition to President Trump). Six studies demonstrated this belief in a favorable future (BFF) for political views, scientific beliefs, and entertainment and product preferences. BFF is greater in magnitude than the tendency to believe that current others share one’s views (false-consensus effect), arises across cultures, is distinct from general optimism, is strongest when people perceive their views as being objective rather than subjective, and can affect (but is distinct from) beliefs about favorable future policy changes. A lab experiment involving monetary bets on the future popularity of politicians and a field experiment involving political donations (N = 660,542) demonstrated that BFF can influence people’s behavior today
Individual experience of positive and negative growth is asymmetric : global evidence from subjective well-being data by Jan-Emmanuel De Neve( Book )

2 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Are individuals more sensitive to losses than gains in macroeconomic growth? Using subjective well-being measures across three large data sets, we observe an asymmetry in the way positive and negative economic growth are experienced, with losses having more than twice as much impact on individual happiness as compared to equivalent gains. We use Gallup World Poll data drawn from 151 countries, BRFSS data taken from a representative sample of 2.5 million US respondents, and Eurobarometer data that cover multiple business cycles over four decades. This research provides a new perspective on the welfare cost of business cycles with implications for growth pol- icy and our understanding of the long-run relationship between GDP and subjective well-being
Feeling good about giving : the benefits (and costs) of self-interested charitable behavior( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Time-saving purchases promote relationship satisfaction by Ashley V Whillans( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Conflicts over chores are one of the primary reasons that couples divorce: both men and women become frustrated working a “second shift” at home. Recent research offers a potential solution to this source of marital conflict: time-saving purchases, such as hiring a housecleaner, can improve personal happiness. Yet, nothing is known about whether and how time-saving purchases promote relationship satisfaction. Across seven studies assessing co-habitating working adults in committed relationships (N=3,206), we find evidence that buying time promotes relationship satisfaction. These benefits occur because buying time protects couples from the negative impact of relationship stress, and enables couples to spend more quality time together. We also document a boundary condition of these effects: Time-saving purchases are most likely to promote relationship satisfaction when couples face controllable (vs. uncontrollable) stressors in their everyday lives. Taken together, this research points to a relatively simple solution to a critical source of marital conflict: spend money to buy time
 
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Alternative Names
Norton, Michael

Norton, Michael 1975-

Norton, Michael I.

Norton, Michael I., 1975-

Norton, Michael Irwin.

Norton, Michael Irwin 1975-

مایکل نورتون

노튼, 마이클

ノートン, マイケル

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