WorldCat Identities

やすいゆたか 1945-

Overview
Works: 22 works in 33 publications in 2 languages and 54 library holdings
Genres: Biography  Criticism, interpretation, etc  Interviews  Reviews 
Roles: Author
Classifications: DS834.9.U46,
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by やすいゆたか
Hyōden Umehara Takeshi : kanashimi no patosu by Yutaka Yasui( Book )

4 editions published in 2005 in Japanese and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Umehara Takeshi Shōtoku Taishi no yume : sūpā kabuki, kyōgen no sekai by Yutaka Yasui( Book )

2 editions published in 2009 in Japanese and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Kirisutokyō to kanibarizumu : Kirisutokyō seiritsu no nazo o seishin bunsekisuru( Book )

2 editions published in 1999 in Japanese and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Sen'yonhyakunen no fuin shotoku taishi no nazo ni semaru by Yutaka Yasui( Book )

2 editions published in 2015 in Japanese and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Fetishizumuron no butikku by Zhengying Shizhong( Book )

2 editions published in 1998 in Japanese and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Gendai eiga kōgi( Book )

1 edition published in 2005 in Japanese and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Statistical applications in geographical healts studies by José Miguel Martínez Martínez( )

2 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Regression analysis for spatial disease rates by Yutaka Yasui( )

2 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Rekishi no kiki : rekishi shūenron o koete = crisis of history by Yutaka Yasui( Book )

1 edition published in 1995 in Japanese and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Rekishi no kiki( Book )

1 edition published in 1995 in Japanese and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Factors influencing risk‐based care of the childhood cancer survivor in the 21st century( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: The population of adult survivors of childhood cancer continues to grow as survival rates improve. Although it is well established that these survivors experience various complications and comorbidities related to their malignancy and treatment, this risk is modified by many factors that are not directly linked to their cancer history. Research evaluating the influence of patient‐specific demographic and genetic factors, premorbid and comorbid conditions, health behaviors, and aging has identified additional risk factors that influence cancer treatment‐related toxicity and possible targets for intervention in this population. Furthermore, although current long‐term follow‐up guidelines comprehensively address specific therapy‐related risks and provide screening recommendations, the risk profile of the population continues to evolve with ongoing modification of treatment strategies and the emergence of novel therapeutics. To address the multifactorial modifiers of cancer treatment‐related health risk and evolving treatment approaches, a patient‐centered and risk‐adapted approach to care that often requires a multidisciplinary team approach, including medical and behavioral providers, is necessary for this population.CA Cancer J Clin 2018;68:133‐152 . ©2018 American Cancer Society
Geographical patterns of excess mortality in Spain explained by two indices of deprivation by Joan Benach( )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Up‐to‐seven criteria as a useful predictor for tumor downstaging to within Milan criteria and Child–Pugh grade deterioration after initial conventional transarterial chemoembolization( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : Aim: Intermediate‐stage hepatocellular carcinoma varies widely in tumor burden and liver function. This study aimed to clarify the importance of subclassification by the up‐to‐seven criteria in both clinical course and liver function deterioration in such patients. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 224 patients with Child–Pugh grade A who underwent initial transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) for hepatocellular carcinoma. Tumor downstaging to within the Milan criteria within 1 year and liver function worsening as Child–Pugh grade deterioration from A to B were analyzed. Results: The median survival time was 35.8 months. Forty‐five patients had no recurrence within 1 year after initial TACE. Of the 179 patients with at least one recurrence within a year, 44 (25%) achieved tumor downstaging to within the Milan criteria and showed significantly longer survival than non‐downstaged ones ( P  = 0.02). Logistic regression univariate analysis revealed that up‐to‐seven criteria fulfillment was associated with tumor downstaging to within the Milan criteria (odds ratio 2.6; P  = 0.007). The median deterioration time was 26.7 months. Multivariate analysis revealed that beyond the up‐to‐seven criteria (hazard ratio [HR] 1.9; P  = 0.005) was an independent factor associated with Child–Pugh grade deterioration, along with serum albumin (HR 1.54; P  = 0.01), serum bilirubin (HR 1.49; P  = 0.02), and prothrombin time (HR 1.54; P  = 0.04). Conclusions: The up‐to‐seven criteria had prognostic value and could predict non‐critical recurrence and maintenance of Child–Pugh grade in patients who underwent initial conventional TACE
Ningenkan no tenkan( Book )

3 editions published in 1986 in Japanese and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Iesu wa taberarete fukkatsushita( Book )

1 edition published in 2000 in Japanese and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Luminous phenomena in connection with the Matsushiro earthquake swarm by Yutaka Yasui( Book )

1 edition published in 1968 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Ōinaru gen'ei( Visual )

1 edition published in 1999 in Japanese and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Cumulative burden of cardiovascular morbidity in paediatric, adolescent, and young adult survivors of Hodgkin's lymphoma: an analysis from the St Jude Lifetime Cohort Study( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Background: The magnitude of cardiovascular morbidity in paediatric, adolescent, and young adult survivors of Hodgkin's lymphoma is not known. Using medically ascertained data, we applied the cumulative burden metric to compare chronic cardiovascular health conditions in survivors of Hodgkin's lymphoma and general population controls. Methods: For this study, participant data were obtained from two ongoing cohort studies at St Jude Children's Research Hospital: the St Jude Lifetime Cohort Study (SJLIFE) and the St Jude Long-term Follow-up Study (SJLTFU). SJLIFE is a cohort study initiated on April 27, 2007, to enable longitudinal clinical evaluation of health outcomes of survivors of childhood cancer treated or followed at St Jude Children's Research Hospital, and SJLTFU is an administrative system-based study initiated in 2000 to collect outcome and late toxicity data for all patients treated at the hospital for childhood cancer. The patient cohort for our study was defined as patients treated at St Jude Children's Research Hospital who reached 18 years of age and were at least 10 years post-diagnosis of pathologically confirmed primary Hodgkin's lymphoma. Outcomes in the Hodgkin's lymphoma survivors were compared with a sample of SJLIFE community control participants, aged 18 years or older at the time of assessment, frequency-matched based on strata defined by 5-year age blocks within each sex, who were selected irrespective of previous medical history. All SJLIFE participants underwent assessment for 22 chronic cardiovascular health conditions. Direct assessments, combined with retrospective clinical reviews, were used to assign severity to conditions using a modified Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4.03 grading schema. Occurrences and CTCAE grades of the conditions for eligible non-SJLIFE participants were accounted for by multiple imputation. The mean cumulative count (treating death as a competing risk) was used to estimate cumulative burden. Findings: Of 670 survivors treated at St Jude Children's Research Hospital, who survived 10 years or longer and reached age 18 years, 348 were clinically assessed in the St Jude Lifetime Cohort Study (SJLIFE); 322 eligible participants did not participate in SJLIFE. Age and sex frequency-matched SJLIFE community controls (n=272) were used for comparison. At age 50 years, the cumulative incidence of survivors experiencing at least one grade 3–5 cardiovascular condition was 45·5% (95% CI 36·6–54·3), compared with 15·7% (7·0–24·4) in community controls. The survivor cohort at age 50 experienced a cumulative burden of 430·6 (95% CI 380·7–480·6) grade 1–5 and 100·8 (77·3–124·3) grade 3–5 cardiovascular conditions per 100 survivors; these numbers were appreciably higher than those in the control cohort (227·4 [192·7–267·5] grade 1–5 conditions and 17·0 [8·4–27·5] grade 3–5 conditions per 100 individuals). Myocardial infarction and structural heart defects were the major contributors to the excess grade 3–5 cumulative burden in survivors. High cardiac radiation dose (≥35 Gy) was associated with an increased proportion of grade 3–5 cardiovascular burden, whereas increased anthracyline dose was not. Interpretation: The true effect of cardiovascular morbidity in paediatric, adolescent, and young adult survivors of Hodgkin's lymphoma is reflected in the cumulative burden. Survivors aged 50 years will experience more than two times the number of chronic cardiovascular health conditions and nearly five times the number of more severe (grade 3–5) cardiovascular conditions compared with community controls and, on average, have one severe, life-threatening, or fatal cardiovascular condition. The cumulative burden metric provides a more comprehensive approach for assessing overall morbidity compared with currently used cumulative incidence based analytic methodologies, and will assist clinical researchers when designing future trials and refining general practice screening guidelines. Funding: US National Cancer Institute, St Baldrick's Foundation, and American Lebanese Syrian Associated Charities
Premature Ovarian Insufficiency in Childhood Cancer Survivors( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : (Abstracted from J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2017;102:2242–2250) Survivors of childhood cancer are at an increased risk of premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) because of the vulnerability of the ovaries to pelvic radiotherapy, alkylating agent chemotherapy, and other gonadotoxic treatment modalities. Although POI can occur early, during, or immediately following cancer treatment completion, it more commonly develops in the years following completion of cancer treatment but prior to age 40 years
The cumulative burden of surviving childhood cancer: an initial report from the St Jude Lifetime Cohort Study (SJLIFE)( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Background: Survivors of childhood cancer develop early and severe chronic health conditions (CHCs). A quantitative landscape of morbidity of survivors, however, has not been described. We aimed to describe the cumulative burden of curative cancer therapy in a clinically assessed ageing population of long-term survivors of childhood cancer. Methods: The St Jude Lifetime Cohort Study (SJLIFE) retrospectively collected data on CHCs in all patients treated for childhood cancer at the St Jude Children's Research Hospital who survived 10 years or longer from initial diagnosis and were 18 years or older as of June 30, 2015. Age-matched and sex-frequency-matched community controls were used for comparison. 21 treatment exposure variables were included in the analysis, with data abstracted from medical records. 168 CHCs for all participants were graded for severity using a modified Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Events. Multiple imputation with predictive mean matching was used for missing occurrences and grades of CHCs in the survivors who were not clinically evaluable. Mean cumulative count was used for descriptive cumulative burden analysis and marked-point-process regression was used for inferential cumulative burden analysis. Findings: Of 5522 patients treated for childhood cancer at St Jude Children's Research Hospital who had complete records, survived 10 years or longer, and were 18 years or older at time of study, 3010 (54·5%) were alive, had enrolled, and had had prospective clinical assessment. 2512 (45·5%) of the 5522 patients were not clinically evaluable. The cumulative incidence of CHCs at age 50 years was 99·9% (95% CI 99·9–99·9) for grade 1–5 CHCs and 96·0% (95% CI 95·3–96·8%) for grade 3–5 CHCs. By age 50 years, a survivor had experienced, on average, 17·1 (95% CI 16·2–18·1) CHCs of any grade, of which 4·7 (4·6–4·9) were CHCs of grade 3–5. The cumulative burden in matched community controls of grade 1–5 CHCs was 9·2 (95% CI 7·9–10·6; p<0·0001 vs total study population) and of grade 3–5 CHCs was 2·3 (1·9–2·7, p<0·0001 vs total study population). Second neoplasms, spinal disorders, and pulmonary disease were major contributors to the excess total cumulative burden. Notable heterogeneity in the distribution of CHC burden in survivors with differing primary cancer diagnoses was observed. The cumulative burden of grade 1–5 CHCs at age 50 years was highest in survivors of CNS malignancies (24·2 [95% CI 20·9–27·5]) and lowest in survivors of germ cell tumours (14·0 [11·5–16·6]). Multivariable analyses showed that older age at diagnosis, treatment era, and higher doses of brain and chest radiation are significantly associated with a greater cumulative burden and severity of CHCs. Interpretation: The burden of CHCs in survivors of childhood cancer is substantial and highly variable. Our assessment of total cumulative burden in survivors of paediatric cancer, with detailed characterisation of long-term CHCs, provide data to better inform future clinical guidelines, research investigations, and health services planning for this vulnerable, medically complex population. Funding: The US National Cancer Institute, St Baldrick's Foundation, and the American Lebanese Syrian Associated Charities
 
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Audience Level
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  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.89 (from 0.66 for Regression ... to 0.99 for Statistica ...)

Alternative Names
Yasui, Yutaka

Yasui, Yutaka, 1945-

やすい, ゆたか

やすいゆたか, 1945-

ヤスイ, ユタカ

ヤスイ, ユタカ, 1945-

保井温, 1945-

Languages
Japanese (20)

English (11)