WorldCat Identities

Human Rights First (Organization)

Overview
Works: 51 works in 77 publications in 1 language and 372 library holdings
Genres: History  Trials, litigation, etc 
Roles: Publisher
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Human Rights First (Organization)
 
Most widely held works by Human Rights First (Organization)
In pursuit of justice : prosecuting terrorism cases in the federal courts by Richard B Zabel( Book )

5 editions published between 2008 and 2009 in English and held by 102 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report shows how existing laws provide an effective basis for detaining, monitoring, and prosecuting terrorist suspects by examining more than 120 international terrorism cases, ranging from epic mega-trials for completed acts of terrorism to individual prosecutions focused on prevention. It analyzes the key legal and practical issues associated with terrorism cases and finds that the federal system generally produces just, reliable results while protecting against security breaches. It is based on a close review of motion papers, docket sheets, judicial opinions, and press accounts, as well as the personal perspectives of prosecutors, defense lawyers, and judges with firsthand terrorism litigation experience. It studies pre-trial detention procedures, rules for protecting classified evidence, the government's discovery obligations, the authentication and admissibility of evidence collected abroad, and other aspects of the federal system that have been challenged by those who support national security courts. Using numerous case-specific examples, it establishes that existing laws not only cover a broad spectrum of terrorism-related crimes but also, in the vast majority of known cases, provide an effective basis for detaining and monitoring suspects. It explains how federal criminal courts balance defendants' rights to review relevant evidence with the need to protect sensitive national security information-a challenge that continues to face the military commissions
By the numbers : findings of the Detainee Abuse and Accountability Project by Detainee Abuse and Accountability Project( Book )

6 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 68 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

By the numbers -- Analysis: Criminal punishment: verdicts and sentencing - Officers' liability under the command responsibility doctrine - Reliance on non-judicial hearings and punishment - Investigative failures -- Recommendations -- Appendix A: Chart of Key Statistics -- Appendix B: Sample Homicide Cases documented by Human Rights First
Command's responsibility : detainee deaths in U.S. custody in Iraq and Afghanistan by Hina Shamsi( Book )

2 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 22 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Human Rights First's new report, "Command's Responsibility : Deaths in U.S. Custody in Iraq and Afghanistan," provides the first comprehensive accounting of the U.S. government's handling of the nearly 100 cases of detainees who have died in U.S. custody since 2002. In its report, Human Rights First looked at some of the most troubling abuse cases, including up to 12 cases in which people were tortured to death. The report found that flawed investigations and a lack of punishment, especially at the highest levels, has lead to a culture of impunity on abuse. Despite the number of deaths of prisoners in U.S. custody, as of February 2006, only 12 detainee deaths have resulted in any kind of punishment for any U.S. official, military or civilian. The report finds that often the more serious the case - particularly those involving people tortured to death - the less severe the punishment; the highest sentence in a torture-related death is five months in prison. Based on this, Human Rights First concluded that a gap exists between policies leadership says it respects on paper, and behavior it actually tolerates in practice
Private security contractors at war : ending the culture of impunity( Book )

4 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Investing in tragedy : China's money, arms, and politics in Sudan( Book )

2 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 17 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Leave no marks : enhanced interrogation techniques and the risk of criminality by Scott Allen( )

2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A comprehensive legal and medical analysis of "enhanced" interrogation techniques and similar forms of abuse, particularly psychological techniques, reportedly authorized and used by U.S. personnel. It analyzes the definitions and elements of war crimes, as well as other applicable legal prohibitions, in light of an extensive body of evidence in the medical literature documenting the serious harmful consequences of these techniques
Arbitrary justice : trials of Guantánamo and Bagram detainees in Afghanistan( Book )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Tortured justice : using coerced evidence to prosecute terrorist suspects by Deborah Colson( Book )

2 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Reformasi & resistance : human rights defenders and counterterrorism in Indonesia( Book )

2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Baseless prosecutions of human rights defenders in Colombia : in the dock and under the gun by Andrew James Hudson( Book )

3 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The new dissidents : human rights defenders and counterterrorism in Russia by Archana Pyati( Book )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Antisemitism : 2007 hate crime survey by Michael McClintock( Book )

2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Ending secret detentions by Deborah Pearlstein( Book )

3 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Detained and denied in Afghanistan : how to make U.S. detention comply with the law by Daphne Eviatar( Book )

2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

After many years of completely denying detainees in Afghanistan the opportunity to defend themselves against arbitrary detention, the United States government has finally implemented a hearing process that allows detainees to hear the charges against them and to make a statement in their own defense. While a significant improvement, these new hearings fall short of minimum standards of due process required by international law. Only by providing detainees in Afghanistan an opportunity to defend themselves in a meaningful manner with the assistance of legal counsel and the opportunity to confront witnesses and the evidence against them can the United States ensure that it is imprisoning the right people. Moreover, only by providing real due process, and demonstrating by example what due process requires, can the United States expect to win the trust and respect of the Afghan people, who see themselves as vulnerable to U.S. military power. The United States' goal of helping Afghanistan improve its justice system is an important and laudable one. In the long term, it will help stabilize the country by encouraging Afghans' respect for their government and trust in their government institutions to protect them. Improving the administration of justice in national security cases will also directly help to ensure that violent insurgents remain incarcerated and cannot threaten Afghan national security. Even after the United States withdraws the bulk of its troops from Afghanistan, ongoing support for its fledgling justice system will be necessary, and critical to the country's stable development. Human Rights First urges the United States government to take a long-term view of the problem and to commit to civilian assistance for Afghan judges, lawyers and legal institutions far into the future
Hate crime : 2007 survey : including companion reports on antisemitism, homophobia and Islamophobia by Michael McClintock( Book )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Habeas works : federal courts' proven capacity to handle Guantánamo cases : a report from former federal judges( )

2 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A report detailing how the United States District Court for the District of Columbia is able to properly and effectively rule on habeas corpus cases of individuals detained at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Human rights first( )

in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Website covers human rights violations in the United States and abroad. Provides information on human and civil rights laws
Abandoning the persecuted : victims of terrorism and oppression barred from asylum by Human Rights First (Organization)( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The United States has a long history of providing safe haven to refugees escaping political oppression and religious persecution in their homelands. But thousands of vulnerable refugees have been prevented from receiving the protection of this country due to overly broad immigration law definitions contained in the USA PATRIOT Act and the Real ID Act of 2005. These provisions bar from asylum or resettlement anyone who has provided what the law terms "material support" to "terrorist organizations." The definitions of these terms in the immigration laws, however, and their application by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the Department of Justice (DOJ), are so exceedingly broad that the bar is, tragically, affecting refugees who do not support terrorism at all. These refugees include: women who were raped and enslaved by armed militias in Liberia; victims of extortion forced to pay armed terrorists in Colombia to protect their lives and their children; and Cubans who supported a group that took up arms against Fidel Castro in the 1960s. Many of these refugees are actually victims of terrorist violence and extortion in places like Colombia, Nepal, and Sri Lanka. Others have provided support to pro-democracy groups with armed wings that have resisted repressive regimes in places like Burma and Cuba, while some supported groups that fought alongside U.S. forces during the war in Vietnam. The U.S. government does not consider these groups to be terrorist organizations in any other context, but because these groups have used arms, they are categorized as "terrorist organizations" under these immigration law provisions. The material support bar has crippled the U.S. resettlement program, a unique private-public partnership through which local communities and church groups across the country assist in welcoming refugees. Thousands of refugees have been prevented from resettling in safety in the United States because of these statutory provisions. Not only are refugees overseas at risk, but so too are many refugees who have already fled to the United States and applied for asylum in this country. This report addresses the impact of the material support bar on the U.S. asylum system and on refugees who have escaped from persecution and sought asylum in the United Sates. These refugees have had their asylum requests denied or relegated to a long-term administrative limbo. The time that they have spent in immigration jails -- or separated from their families -- has been prolonged by months or even years. At the end of this report, we have included profiles of these refugees and others, who -- as outlined in this report -- have had their requests for asylum denied or put on indefinite administrative hold because of the material support bar. While refugees continue to suffer, the various agencies and arms of the U.S. government that are responsible for safeguarding the persecuted have failed to demonstrate the kind of coordination, leadership and commitment that is needed to resolve this problem
The one-year asylum deadline and the BIA : no protection, no process : an analysis of board of immigration appeals decisions 2005-2008 by Heartland Alliance's National Immigrant Justice Center( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In liberty's shadow : U.S. detention of asylum seekers in the era of homeland security by Eleanor Acer( Book )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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In pursuit of justice : prosecuting terrorism cases in the federal courts
Covers
Investing in tragedy : China's money, arms, and politics in SudanArbitrary justice : trials of Guantánamo and Bagram detainees in AfghanistanTortured justice : using coerced evidence to prosecute terrorist suspects
Alternative Names
Languages
English (48)