WorldCat Identities

Knutti, Reto

Overview
Works: 26 works in 28 publications in 2 languages and 26 library holdings
Roles: Author, dgs, Thesis advisor, Contributor
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Reto Knutti
Modelling studies on the probability and predictability of future climate change by Reto Knutti( Book )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Building confidence in climate model projections: an analysis of inferences from fit( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : Climate model projections are used to inform policy decisions and constitute a major focus of climate research. Confidence in climate projections relies on the adequacy of climate models for those projections. The question of how to argue for the adequacy of models for climate projections has not gotten sufficient attention in the climate modeling community. The most common way to evaluate a climate model is to assess in a quantitative way degrees of 'model fit'; that is, how well model results fit observation‐based data (empirical accuracy) and agree with other models or model versions (robustness). However, such assessments are largely silent about what those degrees of fit imply for a model's adequacy for projecting future climate. We provide a conceptual framework for discussing the evaluation of the adequacy of models for climate projections. Drawing on literature from philosophy of science and climate science, we discuss the potential and limits of inferences from model fit. We suggest that support of a model by background knowledge is an additional consideration that can be appealed to in arguments for a model's adequacy for long‐term projections, and that this should explicitly be spelled out. Empirical accuracy, robustness and support by background knowledge neither individually nor collectively constitute sufficient conditions in a strict sense for a model's adequacy for long‐term projections. However, they provide reasons that can be strengthened by additional information and thus contribute to a complex non‐deductive argument for the adequacy of a climate model or a family of models for long‐term climate projections. WIREs Clim Change 2017, 8:e454. doi: 10.1002/wcc.454 For further resources related to this article, please visit theWIREs website . Abstract : The article provides a systematic discussion of different arguments for the adequacy of climate models for long‐term climate projections
The end of model democracy? an editorial comment by Reto Knutti( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Relating European temperature extremes to trends in mean temperature( Book )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Dimming Over the Oceans: Modeling Studies of the Role of Anthropogenic Aerosols in the Climate System by Tanja Nina Dallafior( Book )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Zero emission targets as long-term global goals for climate protection( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Recently, assessments have robustly linked stabilization of global-mean temperature rise to the necessity of limiting the total amount of emitted carbon-dioxide (CO2 ). Halting global warming thus requires virtually zero annual CO2 emissions at some point. Policymakers have now incorporated this concept in the negotiating text for a new global climate agreement, but confusion remains about concepts like carbon neutrality, climate neutrality, full decarbonization, and net zero carbon or net zero greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Here we clarify these concepts, discuss their appropriateness to serve as a long-term global benchmark for achieving temperature targets, and provide a detailed quantification. We find that with current pledges and for a likely (>66%) chance of staying below 2 °C, the scenario literature suggests net zero CO2 emissions between 2060 and 2070, with net negative CO2 emissions thereafter. Because of residual non-CO2 emissions, net zero is always reached later for total GHG emissions than for CO2 . Net zero emissions targets are a useful focal point for policy, linking a global temperature target and socio-economic pathways to a necessary long-term limit on cumulative CO2 emissions
Climate change in Switzerland: a review of physical, institutional, and political aspects( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract Climate change is clearly discernible in observed climate records in Switzerland. It impacts on natural systems, ecosystems, and economic sectors such as agriculture, tourism, and energy, and it affects Swiss livelihood in various ways. The observed and projected changes call for a response from the political system, which in Switzerland is characterized by federalism and direct democratic instruments. Swiss climate science embraces natural and social sciences and builds on institutionalized links between researchers, public, and private stakeholders. In this article, we review the physical, institutional, and political aspects of climate change in Switzerland. We show how the current state of Swiss climate science and policy developed over the past 20 years in the context of international developments and national responses. Specific to Switzerland is its topographic setting with mountain regions and lowlands on both sides of the Alpine ridge, which makes climate change clearly apparent and for some aspects (tourist sector, hydropower, and extreme events) highly relevant and better perceivable (e.g., retreating glaciers). Not surprisingly the Alpine region is of central interest in Swiss climate change studies. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. Conflict of interest: The authors have declared no conflicts of interest for this article
Probabilistic climate change projections for CO2 stabilization profiles( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Constraints on radiative forcing and future climate change from observations and climate model ensembles by Reto Knutti( )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The global hydrological cycle and energy budget under climate change : model evaluation and sensitivity studies( Book )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Constraints on the transcient climate response from observed global temperature and ocean heat uptake by Reto Knutti( )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Limits of linear forcing-feedback frameworks by Maria Almut Amata Rugenstein( Book )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The impact of atmospheric circulation variability on observed and simulated climate trends by Claudio Saffioti( Book )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Sind vereinfachte Modelle zur Klimavorhersage geeignet? by Thomas Stocker( )

1 edition published in 2003 in German and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Uncertainties of low greenhouse gas emission scenarios( Book )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Sensitivity of carbon budgets to permafrost carbon feedbacks and non-CO2 forcings( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: The near proportionality between cumulative CO2 emissions and change in near surface temperature can be used to define a carbon budget: a finite quantity of carbon that can be burned associated with a chosen 'safe' temperature change threshold. Here we evaluate the sensitivity of this carbon budget to permafrost carbon dynamics and changes in non-CO2 forcings. The carbon budget for 2.0 of warming is reduced from 1320 Pg C when considering only forcing from CO2 to 810 Pg C when considering permafrost carbon feedbacks as well as other anthropogenic contributions to climate change. We also examined net carbon budgets following an overshoot of and return to a warming target. That is, the net cumulative CO2 emissions at the point in time a warming target is restored following artificial removal of CO2 from the atmosphere to cool the climate back to a chosen temperature target. These overshoot net carbon budgets are consistently smaller than the conventional carbon budgets. Overall carbon budgets persist as a robust and simple conceptual framework to relate the principle cause of climate change to the impacts of climate change
Uncertainties in climate projections: the role of observational constraints by Aleksandra Borodina( Book )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Mitigation choices impact carbon budget size compatible with low temperature goals( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Global-mean temperature increase is roughly proportional to cumulative emissions of carbon-dioxide (CO2 ). Limiting global warming to any level thus implies a finite CO2 budget. Due to geophysical uncertainties, the size of such budgets can only be expressed in probabilistic terms and is further influenced by non-CO2 emissions. We here explore how societal choices related to energy demand and specific mitigation options influence the size of carbon budgets for meeting a given temperature objective. We find that choices that exclude specific CO2 mitigation technologies (like Carbon Capture and Storage) result in greater costs, smaller compatible CO2 budgets until 2050, but larger CO2 budgets until 2100. Vice versa, choices that lead to a larger CO2 mitigation potential result in CO2 budgets until 2100 that are smaller but can be met at lower costs. In most cases, these budget variations can be explained by the amount of non-CO2 mitigation that is carried out in conjunction with CO2, and associated global carbon prices that also drive mitigation of non-CO2 gases. Budget variations are of the order of 10% around their central value. In all cases, limiting warming to below 2 °C thus still implies that CO2 emissions need to be reduced rapidly in the coming decades
Limited predictability of the future thermohaline circulation close to an instability threshold by Reto Knutti( )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

An interdisciplinary study on scientific visual communication in the context of climate change by Rosemarie McMahon( Book )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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Alternative Names
Reto Knutti Schweizer Klimaforscher und Hochschullehrer

Reto Knutti Swiss climate scientist and professor

Reto Knutti Zwitsers universitair docent (1973-)

Рето Кнути

Languages
English (20)

German (1)