WorldCat Identities

Gabrielle, Benoît

Overview
Works: 24 works in 33 publications in 2 languages and 78 library holdings
Roles: Editor, htt, Other, Opponent, Author, Thesis advisor, Contributor
Classifications: TJ163.2, 333.79
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Benoît Gabrielle
Sustainable agricuture reviews 30 : environmental impact of land use change in agricultural systems( )

8 editions published in 2018 in English and held by 42 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The originality of this book is to review and characterize the current body of scientific publications that describe the complete causal sequence from reorganization of agricultural production to land use changes (LUC) and the resulting environmental impacts. Concerns have been raised recently about the consequences of LUC linked to the expansion of primary production for bioenergy, notably in terms of the greenhouse gas impacts. Such concerns have prompted a sharp increase in the number of scientific publications on this topic over the past ten years. However, scientific research on LUC tends to be highly segmented between that focused on LUC drivers and the body of work examining LUC impacts. In fact, in order to account for LUC impacts /within /when assessing the environmental footprint of biomass production, we need to be able to link reorganization in biomass production to changes in the use and management of soils, and then determine the impacts of those LUC on the environment. Surprisingly, no systematic literature review encompassing this full causal sequence, "drivers - LUC - environmental impacts" have been carried out so far. The present book chapters examines both the range of territorial reorganizations leading to LUC and the range of associated environmental impacts considered in the literature, including GHG emissions, atmospheric pollution, biodiversity impacts, water resources, and soil quality. The analysis consisted of four principal steps: i) identification of research articles using a bibliographic search process; ii) description of these articles' main characteristics; iii) textual analysis of the articles and identification of thematic sub-groups; iv) closer examination of a subset of the sub-group pertaining to non-food biomass production based on a detailed template and a thorough analysis of the results. This is the first time this set of approaches was combined to assess the environmental impact of LUC, and specifically those related to non-food biomass production
Modélisation des cycles des éléments eau-carbone-azote dans un système sol-plante et application à l'estimation des bilans environnementaux des grandes cultures by Benoît Gabrielle( Book )

2 editions published in 1996 in French and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The field-assessment of the environmental impacts of crop production has emerged as a critical issue, since modern agriculture should be expected not to pose major threats. We have here assessed the nitrogen (N) pollutions, caused by such a crop (oilseed rape), through both experimental and modeling approaches. Two types of pollution were investigated : the leaching of nitrate below the root zone, and the gaseous emissions of ammonia (NH3) and nitrous oxide (N2O) to the atmosphere. The prediction of N fluxes at the boundaries of the soil-crop system requires the use of a model simulating the dynamics of water, carbon and N within this system. Among the approaches of various complexities undertaken in the literature, we chose two models representing either a simple (CERES) or a more theoretical (DAISY) viewpoint. Five data sets corresponding to a range of climate and soil conditions were used to test various options for both models. None of the models clearly outranked the other. DAISY performed better as regards heat and mass transfer in soil, but CERES proved a superiority for the simulation of crop growth. Actually, the precisions of the models were also dependent on the type of medium investigated : we then suggested that a functional classification of soils could serve as a basis for determining the form of model to use, that would offer the best precision for a given set of available inputs. Overall, the modifications we proposed to the soil components of CERES allowed this simple approach to yield a satisfactory accuracy in the prediction of the water, carbon and nitrogen fluxes in the soil-crop system
Développement méthodologique pour la mise en oeuvre d'une démarche participative d'éco-quali-conception appliquée aux systèmes de production viticoles. by Anthony Rouault( )

1 edition published in 2019 in French and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

To address new challenges, including environmental ones, the redesign of agricultural systems must incorporate new objectives, change the way concepts and knowledge are mobilized and renew the evaluation methods and criteria used (Meynard et al., 2012). Eco-design aims to integrate environmental aspects into the design of a product (ISO 14006) and can therefore meet these needs and make it possible to design ecoefficient agricultural systems. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a recommended environmental assessment method to support eco-design approaches. Moreover, in France, where 93% of wine production is produced under quality labels (INAO, 2016), quality is often as important as yield in defining wine production objectives. This thesis work explores the interest and modalities of a convergence between ecodesign and co-design of cropping systems. The problem is thus articulated in three stages: i) Why and how can a participatory eco-design approach be implemented in agriculture? ii) LCA and participatory eco-design approach in viticulture: which methodological questions and solutions? iii) How to integrate a grape quality objective into an eco-design approach in viticulture? These questions were explored through the implementation of a participatory eco-design approach involving winegrowers and wine advisors. This approach was defined and applied with two groups of winegrowers and their wine advisors in the Loire Valley
L'énergie à découvert by Rémy Mosseri( )

1 edition published in 2017 in French and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

L'énergie est devenue une question vitale pour les sociétés, le citoyen, l'humanité tout entière. Sujet scientifique, économique, politique et écologique majeur, elle suscite des débats, parfois violents, sur les choix à faire aujourd'hui et leurs conséquences pour l'avenir des hommes et de la planète. Mais, alors que se tient le grand débat national sur la transition énergétique, comment se forger une opinion objective sans connaître les données scientifiques les plus complètes sur les potentiels et les limites de chaque source d'énergie? Ce livre les met enfin à la disposition du public. L'énergie, qu'est-ce que c'est? Quelles sont les grandes lois physiques qui la gouvernent? Comment la produire, la transporter, la stocker? Le solaire, la biomasse, l'éolien, l'hydraulique sont-ils des solutions alternatives suffisantes? Et quelle part leur réserver à l'avenir? Les nombreux articles de ce livre (près de 130) proposent au citoyen des outils pour se faire une opinion face à ces questions. Physiciens, chimistes, biologistes, géophysiciens, environnementalistes, géographes, économistes, y précisent, chiffres et schémas à l'appui, la place respective des énergies fossiles, du nucléaire et des énergies renouvelables. Au-delà, ils expliquent quelles sont les perspectives offertes par la science sur le mix énergétique, le problème du stockage, l'amélioration de nos usages de l'énergie, ses impacts environnementaux et sanitaires
Life cycle assessment of vegetable products: a review focusing on cropping systems diversity and the estimation of field emissions by Aurélie Perrin( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Using Agroecosystem Modeling to Improve the Estimates of N2O Emissions in the Life-Cycle Assessment of Biofuels by Karine Dufossé( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Using a crop model to account for the effects of local factors on the LCA of sugar beet ethanol in Picardy region, France by Cécile Bessou( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

29 % N2O emission reduction from a modelled low-greenhouse gas cropping system during 2009-2011 by Pietro Goglio( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Key unknowns in nitrogen budget for oil palm plantations. A review by Lénaïc Pardon( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Proper selection of substrates and crops enhances the sustainability of Paris rooftop garden by Erica Dorr( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Unravelling Land-Use Change Mechanisms at Global and Regional Scales by T Brunelle( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Exploring trade-offs among indicators of performance and environmental impact in livestock areas by Joao Pedro Domingues( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Environmental impact of land use change in agricultural systems( Book )

2 editions published in 2018 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The originality of this book is to review and characterize the current body of scientific publications that describe the complete causal sequence from reorganization of agricultural production to land use changes (LUC) and the resulting environmental impacts. Concerns have been raised recently about the consequences of LUC linked to the expansion of primary production for bioenergy, notably in terms of the greenhouse gas impacts. Such concerns have prompted a sharp increase in the number of scientific publications on this topic over the past ten years. However, scientific research on LUC tends to be highly segmented between that focused on LUC drivers and the body of work examining LUC impacts. In fact, in order to account for LUC impacts /within /when assessing the environmental footprint of biomass production, we need to be able to link reorganization in biomass production to changes in the use and management of soils, and then determine the impacts of those LUC on the environment. Surprisingly, no systematic literature review encompassing this full causal sequence, "drivers - LUC - environmental impacts" have been carried out so far. The present book chapters examines both the range of territorial reorganizations leading to LUC and the range of associated environmental impacts considered in the literature, including GHG emissions, atmospheric pollution, biodiversity impacts, water resources, and soil quality. The analysis consisted of four principal steps: i) identification of research articles using a bibliographic search process; ii) description of these articles' main characteristics; iii) textual analysis of the articles and identification of thematic sub-groups; iv) closer examination of a subset of the sub-group pertaining to non-food biomass production based on a detailed template and a thorough analysis of the results. This is the first time this set of approaches was combined to assess the environmental impact of LUC, and specifically those related to non-food biomass production." -- prové de l'editor
Integrated design and sustainable assessment of innovative biomass supply chains: A case-study on miscanthus in France( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Highlights: Optimum sizes of biomass supply chain from economic and environmental standpoints differ. Expanding biomass supply did not impact the profitability, which remained around 20 €/t DM. Expanding the biomass supply led to higher environmental impacts due to scattered crop production. Low-cost densification options such as decentralized briquetting emerge as the optimal choice. Autumn harvesting increases profitability when biomass storage is limited or costly. Abstract: Cost-efficient, environmental-friendly and socially sustainable biomass supply chains are urgently needed to achieve the 2020 targets of the Strategic Energy Technologies-Plan of the European Union. This paper investigated technical, social, economic, and environmental barriers to the development and innovation of supply chains, taking into account a large range of parameters influencing the performances of biomass systems at supply chain scale. An assessment framework was developed that combined economic optimization of a supply chain with a holistic and integrated sustainability assessment. The framework was applied to a case-study involving miscanthus biomass in the Burgundy region (Eastern France) to compare alternative biomass supply chain scenarios with different annual biomass demand, crop yield, harvest timing and densification technologies. These biomass supply chain scenarios were first economically optimized across the whole supply chain (from field to plant gate) by considering potential feedstock production (from a high-resolution map), costs, logistical constraints and product prices. Then sustainability assessment was conducted by combining recognized methodologies: economic analysis, multi-regional input-output analysis, emergy assessment, and life-cycle assessment. The analysis of the case study scenarios found that expanding biomass supply from 6, 000 to 30, 000 tons of dry matter per year did not impact the profitability, which remained around 20€ per ton of biomass procured. Regarding environmental impacts, the scenario with the lowest feedstock supply area had the lowest impact per ton due to low economies of scale. Mobile briquetting proved to be also a viable economic option, especially in situations with a considerable scattering of the crop production and expensive transportation logistics. By highlighting hot-spots in terms of economic, environmental and social impacts of biomass supply systems, this study provides guidance in the supply chain optimization and the design of technological solutions tailored to economic operators as well as other stakeholders, such as policy makers
Rouissage au sol du chanvre industriel (Cannabis sativa L.) : dynamique sous environnement contrôlé et modélisation by Laurent Bleuze( )

1 edition published in 2019 in French and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Le rouissage au champ est un processus qui, grâce à une dégradation microbienne sélective des tissus externes des tiges, conduit à la dissociation partielle des fibres cellulosiques extraxylémiennes, facilitant leur extraction mécanique ultérieure. Il est sous le contrôle de facteurs biotiques et abiotiques dont les effets sont encore mal connus. L'objectif du doctorat était de quantifier et modéliser l'influence de ces facteurs sur le rouissage pour le chanvre industriel (Cannabis sativa L.).Le développement d'un système expérimental novateur a permis de conduire le rouissage sur sol en environnement contrôlé (humidité, température et lumière). La dynamique de rouissage a été caractérisée par mesures des paramètres physico-chimiques des paillis (couleur, masse, composition chimique, architecture tissulaire des tiges) et biologiques (activités enzymatiques). La date de récolte du chanvre (au stade floraison ou au stade maturité de la graine), a modifié les caractéristiques chimiques des tiges et leur dynamique de rouissage en réduisant d'environ 14 jours (à 15°C) la durée de rouissage pour les tiges récoltées à la floraison. La dynamique de colonisation microbienne a été mise en évidence à l'échelle des tiges, mais aussi verticalement au sein du paillis. Les résultats ont permis le développement d'un modèle numérique de rouissage simulant la dégradation biologique des tissus externes (BioRETTING) et l'évolution des propriétés du paillis au cours du rouissage (MulchRETTING). Les analyses par colorimétrie et spectroscopie infrarouge (ATR) sont prometteuses pour le développement d'indicateur de suivi du rouissage au champ
Nouvelles approches pour l'évaluation environnementale des biocarburants avancés by Fabio Machado Menten( )

1 edition published in 2013 in French and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) has been used in legislative texts in Europe and in the United States to quantify the benefits of biofuel production in terms of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reductions and energy security. In this thesis, we propose two independent approaches to investigate the compliance of advanced biofuels (cellulosic ethanol, Biomass to liquids - BTL, microalgae FAME/HVO) production with these objectives. The first one is a meta- analysis (literature synthesis) of LCA studies concerning advanced biofuels. Using econometric methods, we are able to identify and quantify the main factors impacting GHG emission LCA results. Also, we estimate a confidence interval for these results for each type of advanced biofuel in question. The second part of this work is a consequential and prospective LCA illustrated by a case study about the introduction of BTL technology in France. A long-term TIMES-type energy model was adapted for environmental evaluations in order to capture impacts occurring in affected systems through economic mechanisms. We contribute, with this work, for a proper systematization of consequential and prospective LCA. We discuss the functional unit and system boundaries definitions, the use of dynamic impact characterization factors, the use of scenarios (different political and economical contexts) and the exploration of the system's boundaries to bring attention to the limits of the model employed
Analyse de cycle de vie de la production bovine : exploration de pratiques et de changements de système pour réduire les impacts environnementaux by Thi Tuyet Hanh Nguyen( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This thesis addresses the environmental impacts of cattle production systems. The first objective of this thesis was to analyse and compare the environmental impacts of suckler-beef and dairy production systems using attributional life cycle assessment (ALCA). Subsequently, the effects of mitigation practices for suckler-beef production systems were assessed. The second objective addressed methodology development by exploring possible consequences due to an increase in preference for grass-based milk using consequential LCA (CLCA).For a suckler-beef production system, enteric methane fermentation was the main contributor to the climate change impact, and grassland production contributed most to other impacts (cumulative energy demand, eutrophication, acidification and land occupation). The suckler cow-calf herd substantially contributed to the impacts of the suckler-beef system. The most effective mitigation practice for the suckler-beef production system was decreasing calving age from 3 to 2 years. The use of lipids rich in omega-3 fatty acids in ruminant diets did not substantially affect the impacts of the suckler-beef production system. Simultaneous application of several compatible practices can substantially mitigate the impacts of the suckler-beef production system. The application of certain practices (e.g. reducing ungrazed grass losses, fattening heifers not used for replacement and reducing calving age) reduced land occupation. Alternative uses for the “released land”, e.g. the introduction of forest to sequester C into biomass, seems promising. For dairy production systems, the assessment focused on a grass-based vs. maize-silage-based system, dual-purpose breed (Normande) vs. specialised breed (Holstein) and the effect of increasing milk yield per cow, using the ALCA approach. Independent of co-product handling methods, the impacts per kg of milk were lower with the maize-silage-based system and with Holstein cows (except for eutrophication). Increasing milk yield per cow by increasing feed energy intake and applying more intensive management (first calving at 2 years) decreased the impacts of milk and its beef co-product. The consequences of converting a maize-silage-based to a grass-based dairy farm in France to meet the increased domestic preference for grass-based milk were assessed using the CLCA approach. This farm conversion caused land-use change outside the dairy farm and thus substantially increased the impacts of the whole production system and the milk it produced
Modélisation des transitions en agriculture : énergie, azote, et capacité nourricière de la France dans la longue durée (1882-2016) et prémices pour une généralisation à l'échelle mondiale by Souhil Harchaoui( )

1 edition published in 2019 in French and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Face aux enjeux de changement climatique et de transition énergétique associés aux prévisions de croissance démographique au cours du XXIème siècle, l'agriculture doit se transformer pour produire plus de nourriture tout en réduisant sa dépendance aux ressources non-renouvelables et en préservant les écosystèmes. Dans ce contexte, cette thèse s'intéresse à examiner les impacts des contraintes biophysiques et des transformations sociotechniques sur le métabolisme agricole, les transitions et la capacité nourricière de l'agriculture. Le métabolisme agricole est modélisé par les flux d'énergie et d'azote que le système agricole mobilise et transforme pour fonctionner et fournir de la biomasse. Ce cadre analytique permet d'une part de positionner l'agriculture dans les enjeux de la transition énergétique et, d'autre part, de quantifier conjointement la capacité nourricière atteignable et son impact sur la biogéochimie planétaire. Nous examinons le métabolisme agricole à deux niveaux d'échelles spatio-temporelles : une modélisation en perspective historique de longue durée (1882-2016) à l'échelle de la France et une modélisation historique (1961-2013) et prospective à l'échelle du monde. L'analyse de l'agriculture en France s'appuie sur la modélisation des données historiques de productions et des moyens de productions. Nous mettons en lumière les mécanismes qui relient les entrées et sorties du système agricole, et les transitions énergétiques et azote associées de manière continue depuis 1882. Nous caractérisons la trajectoire française à l'aide d'indicateurs d'efficacité, de retour sur investissement énergétique, de surplus agricole, d'autosuffisance et de neutralité énergétique du système. La neutralité énergétique est un indicateur clé pour positionner l'agriculture dans la transition énergétique à venir. Nous retraçons l'impact des transformations sociotechniques sur les transitions qui ont fait quadrupler le surplus alimentaire des fermes et ont réduit presque à zéro leur autosuffisance énergétique. L'agriculture produisait en énergie deux fois ce qu'elle consommait en temps préindustriels contre quatre fois aujourd'hui, or elle est passée d'un système énergétiquement autonome nourri de biomasse à un système quasi-exclusivement nourri d'énergies fossiles. Exprimée en équivalent biomasse, la consommation actuelle d'énergie de l'agriculture est égale à sa production, ce qui en fait un système énergétiquement inintéressant. Le défi pour l'agriculture est de contribuer à la transition énergétique sans empiéter sur sa production alimentaire. Relever ce défi, qui est peu compris par la société, passe par l'amélioration de la performance énergétique de l'agriculture et implique l'amélioration de l'efficacité d'utilisation de l'azote ainsi que la réduction de l'élevage surtout des monogastriques, la valorisation énergétique d'une majorité des résidus agricoles et la réduction du travail au champ. La modélisation à l'échelle mondiale permet de caractériser la trajectoire de l'agriculture en termes de capacité nourricière et d'impact environnemental et d'évaluer sa capacité limite de production sur la base des contraintes biophysiques. Cette modélisation est un premier module centré sur le métabolisme azote et ne tient pas compte du mode de fonctionnement énergétique de l'agriculture. Nous examinons les limites de production alimentaire mondiale conjointement avec les pertes d'azote en fonction des degrés d'autosuffisance en azote. Nous montrons que la population humaine maximale supportable sur Terre peut varier de 6 à 17 milliards de personnes en fonction de la part de la production totale de grain utilisée dans l'alimentation animale, l'efficacité d'utilisation de l'azote et le régime de fertilisation azotée. Cette analyse permet de confronter, comme c'est rarement fait, les projections démographiques officielles pour le XXIe siècle à des contraintes biophysiques planétaires et discuter leurs conditions de réalisation
Emissions de gaz à effet de serre des biocarburants : amélioration des Analyses de Cycle de Vie par la prise en compte des facteurs de production locaux by Cécile Bessou( Book )

in French and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

L'Analyse de Cycle de Vie (ACV) permet de comptabiliser les émissions de la production à la combustion d'un biocarburant mais elle ne prend pas en compte la dynamique locale de ces émissions, notamment celle des émissions de N2O, principal gaz à effet de serre agricole. Notre objectif fut d'abord d'analyse l'effet du tassement du sol sur les émissions de N2O en combinant expérimentation et modélisation. À l'aide de chambres automatiques sur des parcelles de betterave, nous avons mesuré en 2007-2008 des émissions cumulées de 944-977 g N-N2O ha-1 en sol non tassé et 1,448-1,382 g N-N2O ha-1 en sol tassé. Les émissions plus importantes sur le tassé furent surtout dues aux conditions anoxiques propices à la dénitrification. Nous avons modifié le modèle NOE pour mieux simuler la nitrification et la variation des fractions de N2O sur les produits totaux. Malgré une meilleure prédiction de la nitrification et des flux post-fertilisation, le modèle modifié NOE2 sous-estima les émissions totales. La sévère sous-estimation en été montre que les cycles sec-humides peuvent entraîner de fortes émissions dont le déterminisme n'est ni élucidé ni modélisé. Nous avons ensuite utilisé un modèle d'agro-écosystème (CERES-EGC-NOE2) pour produire les données d'inventaire pour nos ACV locales. L'éthanol de Miscanthus produit en Picardie entraîne potentiellement beaucoup moins d'impacts environnementaux que celui de betterave. Comparés à l'essence, l'éthanol de Miscanthus permettrait une réduction de gaz à effet de serre de 82-85% par MJ, celui de betterave une réduction de 28-42% par MJ en fonction des conditions pédo-climatiques et des pratiques agricoles locales
 
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French (8)