WorldCat Identities

Okninski, Adam

Overview
Works: 1 works in 1 publications in 1 language and 1 library holdings
Publication Timeline
.
Most widely held works by Adam Okninski
On use of hybrid rocket propulsion for suborbital vehicles( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: While the majority of operating suborbital rockets use solid rocket propulsion, recent advancements in the field of hybrid rocket motors lead to renewed interest in their use in sounding rockets. This paper presents results of optimisation of sounding rockets using hybrid propulsion. An overview of vehicles under development during the last decade, as well as heritage systems is provided. Different propellant combinations are discussed and their performance assessment is given. While Liquid Oxygen, Nitrous Oxide and Nitric Acid have been widely tested with various solid fuels in flight, Hydrogen Peroxide remains an oxidiser with very limited sounding rocket applications. The benefits of hybrid propulsion for sounding rockets are given. In case of hybrid rocket motors the thrust curve can be optimised for each flight, using a flow regulator, depending on the payload and mission. Results of studies concerning the optimal burn duration and nozzle selection are given. Specific considerations are provided for the Polish ILR-33 "Amber" sounding rocket. Low regression rates, which up to date were viewed as a drawback of hybrid propulsion may be used to the benefit of maximising rocket performance if small solid rocket boosters are used during the initial flight period. While increased interest in hybrid propulsion is present, no up-to-date reference concerning use of hybrid rocket propulsion for sounding rockets is available. The ultimate goal of the paper is to provide insight into the sensitivity of different design parameters on performance of hybrid sounding rockets and delve into the potential and challenges of using hybrid rocket technology for expendable suborbital applications. Highlights: An analysis of heritage and modern suborbital hybrid rockets is provided. Use of different storable hybrid propellants is discussed. The paper includes a study of rocket performance sensitivity to aerodynamic design. The potential benefit of using small boosters with a main hybrid stage is demonstrated. Burn durations longer than for solid-propellant rockets are optimal for hybrid rockets
 
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  General Special  
Audience level: 0.00 (from 0.00 for On use of ... to 0.00 for On use of ...)

Languages