WorldCat Identities

Batran, Salah-Eddin al-

Overview
Works: 14 works in 17 publications in 2 languages and 37 library holdings
Roles: Author, Contributor
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Salah-Eddin al- Batran
Immunzytochemischer Nachweis der Serinproteinase Cathepsin G in normalem Knochenmark sowie bei akuten Leukämien : ein Vergleich mit der Myeloperoxidase by Salah E Al-Batran( )

4 editions published in 1996 in German and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Biologie und zielgerichtete Therapie des Magenkarzinoms by Florian Lordick( Book )

1 edition published in 2015 in German and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

EVITA : a double-blind, vehicle controlled, randomized phase II trial of vitamin K1 cream as prophylaxis for cetuximab-induced skin toxicity( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Acne-like skin rash is a frequently occurring adverse event associated with drugs against the epidermal growth factor receptor. This randomized vehicle-controlled study investigated the addition of vitamin K1 cream to doxycycline in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with cetuximab. Patients and Methods Patients receiving 1st line cetuximab + FOLFIRI were randomly assigned to prophylactic treatment with doxycylin and vitamin K1 cream or doxycycline and the vehicle. The primary end point of the study was the incidence of grade % 2 skin rash (NCI CTCAE version 4.02) during 8 weeks of skin treatment. Secondary endpoints comprised skin rash according to a more thorough tripartite skin toxicity score (WoMo), quality of life, efficacy and compliance. The study had 80% power to show a 20% reduction of the incidence of grade % 2 skin rash. Results A total of 126 patients were analyzed. The incidence of skin rash grade % 2 was comparable between the arms. Likewise, no difference was seen in the WoMo score with respect to the percentage of skin affected. However, starting in week 5 and increasing over time patients treated with vitamin K1 cream had less severe rash and fewer fissures. Quality of life as well as efficacy and compliance with study medication and anti-cancer treatment was comparable in both arms. Conclusion The primary endpoint of decreasing grade % 2 skin rash was not met. However, using vitamin K1 cream as part of prophylactic treatment decreased the severity of acne-like skin rash according to WoMo, an alternative and more thorough skin toxicity scoring tool
New histone deacetylase inhibitors as potential therapeutic tools for advanced prostate carcinoma by Steffen Alexander Wedel( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

FOLFIRI plus cetuximab versus FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab for metastatic colorectal cancer (FIRE-3): a post-hoc analysis of tumour dynamics in the final RAS wild-type subgroup of this randomised open-label phase 3 trial( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Background: FIRE-3 compared first-line 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, and irinotecan (FOLFIRI) plus cetuximab with FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab in patients with KRAS exon 2 wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer. The same study also reported an exploratory analysis of a subgroup of patients with tumours that were wild-type at other RAS genes ( KRAS and NRAS exons 2–4). We report here efficacy results for the FIRE-3 final RAS ( KRAS/NRAS, exons 2–4) wild-type subgroup. Moreover, new metrics of tumour dynamics were explored during a centralised radiological review to investigate how FOLFIRI plus cetuximab conferred overall survival benefit in the absence of differences in investigator-assessed objective responses and progression-free survival. Methods: FIRE-3 was a randomised phase 3 trial comparing FOLFIRI plus cetuximab with FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab in the first-line treatment of patients with KRAS exon 2 wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer. The primary endpoint of the FIRE-3 study was the proportion of patients achieving an objective response according to Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.0 in the intention-to-treat population. A centralised radiological review of CT scans was done in a post-hoc analysis to assess objective response according to RECIST 1.1, early tumour shrinkage, depth of response, duration of response, and time to response in the final RAS wild-type subgroup. Comparisons between treatment groups with respect to objective response rate and early tumour shrinkage were made using Fisher's exact test (two-sided), while differences in depth of response were investigated with a two-sided Wilcoxon test. This trial is registered atClinicalTrials.gov, numberNCT00433927 . Findings: In the final RAS wild-type population (n=400), median overall survival was better in the FOLFIRI plus cetuximab group than the FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab group (33·1 months [95% CI 24·5–39·4] vs 25·0 months [23·0–28·1]; hazard ratio 0·70 [0·54–0·90]; p=0·0059), although investigator-assessed objective response and progression-free survival were comparable between treatment groups. Centralised radiological review of CT-assessable patients (n=330) showed that the proportion of patients achieving an objective response (113 of 157, 72·0% [95% CI 64·3–78·8] vs 97 of 173, 56·1% [48·3–63·6]; p=0·0029), frequency of early tumour shrinkage (107 of 157, 68·2% [60·3–75·4] vs 85 of 173, 49·1% [41·5–56·8]; p=0·0005), and median depth of response (–48·9% [–54·3 to −42·0] vs −32·3% [–38·2 to −29·2]; p<0·0001) were significantly better in extended RAS wild-type patients receiving FOLFIRI plus cetuximab versus those receiving FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab. No differences in duration of response and time to response were observed between treatment groups. Interpretation: This analysis provides a new framework that connects alternative metrics of response to overall survival. Superior response-related outcome parameters, such as early tumour shrinkage and depth of response, obtained by centralised radiological review correlated with the overall survival benefit conferred by FOLFIRI plus cetuximab compared with FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab in the extended RAS wild-type subgroup. Funding: Merck KGaA and Pfizer
Maintenance strategies after first-line oxaliplatin plus fluoropyrimidine plus bevacizumab for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (AIO 0207): a randomised, non-inferiority, open-label, phase 3 trial( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Background: The definition of a best maintenance strategy following combination chemotherapy plus bevacizumab in metastatic colorectal cancer is unclear. We investigated whether no continuation of therapy or bevacizumab alone are non-inferior to fluoropyrimidine plus bevacizumab, following induction treatment with a fluoropyrimidine plus oxaliplatin plus bevacizumab. Methods: In this open-label, non-inferiority, randomised phase 3 trial, we included patients aged 18 years or older with histologically confirmed, previously untreated metastatic colorectal cancer, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status of 0–2, adequate bone marrow, liver, and renal function, no pre-existing neuropathy greater than grade 1, and measurable disease, from 55 hospitals and 51 private practices in Germany. After 24 weeks of induction therapy with either fluorouracil plus leucovorin plus oxaliplatin or capecitabine plus oxaliplatin, both with bevacizumab, patients without disease progression were randomly assigned centrally by fax (1:1:1) to standard maintenance treatment with a fluoropyrimidine plus bevacizumab, bevacizumab alone, or no treatment. Both patients and investigators were aware of treatment assignment. Stratification criteria were response status, termination of oxaliplatin, previous adjuvant treatment with oxaliplatin, and ECOG performance status. At first progression, re-induction with all drugs of the induction treatment was a planned part of the protocol. Time to failure of strategy was the primary endpoint, defined as time from randomisation to second progression after maintenance (and if applicable re-induction), death, or initiation of further treatment including a new drug. Time to failure of strategy was equivalent to time to first progression for patients who did not receive re-induction (for any reason). The boundary for assessment of non-inferiority was upper limit of the one-sided 98·8% CI 1·43. Analyses were done by intention to treat. The study has completed recruitment, but follow-up of participants is ongoing. The trial is registered withClinicalTrials.gov, numberNCT00973609 . Findings: Between Sept 17, 2009, and Feb 21, 2013, 837 patients were enrolled and 472 randomised; 158 were randomly assigned to receive fluoropyrimidine plus bevacizumab, 156 to receive bevacizumab monotherapy, and 158 to receive no treatment. Median follow-up from randomisation is 17·0 months (IQR 9·5–25·4). Median time to failure of strategy was 6·9 months (95% CI 6·1–8·5) for the fluoropyrimidine plus bevacizumab group, 6·1 months (5·3–7·4) for the bevacizumab alone group, and 6·4 months (4·8–7·6) for the no treatment group. Bevacizumab alone was non-inferior to standard fluoropyrimidine plus bevacizumab (hazard ratio [HR] 1·08 [95% CI 0·85–1·37]; p=0·53; upper limit of the one-sided 98·8% CI 1·42), whereas no treatment was not (HR 1·26 [0·99–1·60]; p=0·056; upper limit of the one-sided 98·8% CI 1·65). The protocol-defined re-induction after first progression was rarely done (30 [19%] patients in the fluoropyrimidine plus bevacizumab group, 67 [43%] in the bevacizumab monotherapy group, and 73 [46%] in the no treatment group. The most common grade 3 adverse event was sensory neuropathy (21 [13%] of 158 patients in the fluoropyrimidine plus bevacizumab group, 22 [14%] of 156 patients in the bevacizumab alone group, and 12 [8%] of 158 patients in the no treatment group). Interpretation: Although non-inferiority for bevacizumab alone was demonstrated for the primary endpoint, maintenance treatment with a fluoropyrimidine plus bevacizumab may be the preferable option for patients following an induction treatment with a fluoropyrimidine, oxaliplatin, and bevacizumab, as it allows the planned discontinuation of the initial combination without compromising time with controlled disease. Only a few patients were exposed to re-induction treatment, thus deeming the primary endpoint time to failure of strategy non-informative and clinically irrelevant. Progression-free survival and overall survival should be considered primary endpoints in future trials exploring maintenance strategies. Funding: RochePharma AG and AIO Studien gGmbH
The Role of Radiation Therapy for Resectable Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : Adenocarcinoma of the gastroesophageal junction has become a very important subentity, for which multidisciplinary care is the widely accepted treatment approach; however, the role of radiation therapy for adenocarcinoma of gastroesophageal junction remains unclear
Phase I study of everolimus and mitomycin C for patients with metastatic esophagogastric adenocarcinoma by Dominique Werner( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Histopathological regression after neoadjuvant docetaxel, oxaliplatin, fluorouracil, and leucovorin versus epirubicin, cisplatin, and fluorouracil or capecitabine in patients with resectable gastric or gastro-oesophageal junction adenocarcinoma (FLOT4-AIO): results from the phase 2 part of a multicentre, open-label, randomised phase 2/3 trial( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Background: Docetaxel-based chemotherapy is effective in metastatic gastric and gastro-oesophageal junction adenocarcinoma, but has not yet been evaluated in the context of resectable patients. Here we report findings from the phase 2 part of the phase 2/3 FLOT4 trial, which compared histopathological regression in patients treated with a docetaxel-based triplet chemotherapy versus an anthracycline-based triplet chemotherapy before surgical resection. Methods: In this randomised, open-label, phase 2/3 study, eligible participants were recruited from 28 German oncology centres. Patients with resectable gastric or gastro-oesophageal junction cancer who had clinical stage cT2 or higher, nodal positive (cN+) disease, or both were randomly assigned (1:1) to either three preoperative and three postoperative 3-week cycles of intravenous epirubicin 50 mg/m 2 on day 1, intravenous cisplatin 60 mg/m 2 on day 1, and either fluorouracil 200 mg/m 2 as continuous intravenous infusion or capecitabine 1250 mg/m 2 orally (two doses of 625 mg/m 2 per day) on days 1 to 21 (ECF/ECX group) or four preoperative and four postoperative 2-week cycles of docetaxel 50 mg/m 2, intravenous oxaliplatin 85 mg/m 2, intravenous leucovorin 200 mg/m 2, and fluorouracil 2600 mg/m 2 as a 24 h infusion, all on day 1 (FLOT group). Randomisation was done centrally with an interactive web-response system based on a sequence generated with blocks (block size 2) stratified by Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, location of primary tumour, age, and nodal status. No masking was done. Central assessment of pathological regression was done according to the Becker criteria. The primary endpoint was pathological complete regression (tumour regression grade TRG1a) and was analysed in the modified intention-to-treat population, defined as all patients who were randomly assigned to treatment excluding patients who had surgery but did not provide resection specimens for central evaluation. The study (including the phase 3 part) has completed enrolment, but follow-up is ongoing and this is an interim analysis. The trial is registered withClinicalTrials.gov, numberNCT01216644 . Findings: Between Aug 18, 2010, and Aug 10, 2012, 300 patients (152 patients in the ECF/ECX group; 148 patients in the FLOT group) were enrolled into the phase 2 part of the study, 265 of whom (137 in the ECF/ECX group; 128 in the FLOT group) were assessable on a modified intention-to-treat basis. 119 (93%) of 128 patients in the FLOT group and 126 (92%) of 137 patients in the ECF/ECX group were given all planned preoperative cycles of treatment. FLOT was associated with significantly higher proportions of patients achieving pathological complete regression than was ECF/ECX (20 [16%; 95% CI 10–23] of 128 patients vs eight [6%; 3–11] of 137 patients; p=0·02). 44 (40%) of 111 patients in the ECF/ECX group and 30 (25%) of 119 patients in the FLOT group had at least one serious adverse event involving a perioperative medical or surgical complication. The most common non-surgical grade 3–4 adverse events were neutropenia (52 [38%] of 137 patients in the ECF/ECX group vs 67 [52%] of 128 patients in the FLOT group), leucopenia (28 [20%] vs 36 [28%]), nausea (23 [17%] vs 12 [9%]), infection (16 [12%] vs 15 [12%]), fatigue (19 [14%] vs 11 [9%]), and vomiting (13 [10%] vs four [3%]). Interpretation: Perioperative FLOT was active and feasible to administer, and might represent an option for patients with locally advanced, resectable gastric or gastro-eosophageal junction adenocarcinoma. Funding: None
SY10-1-2Newest Knowlege in gastric cancer: multimodal therapy of gastric cancer( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Rilotumumab plus epirubicin, cisplatin, and capecitabine as first-line therapy in advanced MET-positive gastric or gastro-oesophageal junction cancer (RILOMET-1): a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Background: Rilotumumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody that selectively targets the ligand of the MET receptor, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). We aimed to assess the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of rilotumumab combined with epirubicin, cisplatin, and capecitabine, and to assess potential biomarkers, in patients with advanced MET-positive gastric or gastro-oesophageal junction adenocarcinoma. Methods: This multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 study was done at 152 centres in 27 countries. We recruited adults (aged ≥18 years) with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic gastric or gastro-oesophageal junction adenocarcinoma, an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status of 0 or 1, MET-positive tumours (≥25% of tumour cells with membrane staining of ≥1+ staining intensity), and evaluable disease, who had not received previous systemic therapy. Eligible patients were randomly assigned (1:1) via a computerised voice response system to receive rilotumumab 15 mg/kg intravenously or placebo in combination with open-label chemotherapy (epirubicin 50 mg/m 2 intravenously; cisplatin 60 mg/m 2 intravenously; capecitabine 625 mg/m 2 orally twice daily) in 21-day cycles for up to ten cycles. After completion of chemotherapy, patients continued to receive rilotumumab or placebo monotherapy until disease progression, intolerability, withdrawal of consent, or study termination. Randomisation was stratified by disease extent and ECOG performance status. Both patients and physicians were masked to study treatment assignment. The primary endpoint was overall survival, analysed by intention to treat. We report the final analysis. This study is registered withClinicalTrials.gov, numberNCT01697072 . Findings: Between Nov 7, 2012, and Nov 21, 2014, 609 patients were randomly assigned to rilotumumab plus epirubicin, cisplatin, and capecitabine (rilotumumab group; n=304) or placebo plus epirubicin, cisplatin, and capecitabine (placebo group; n=305). Study treatment was stopped early after an independent data monitoring committee found a higher number of deaths in the rilotumumab group than in the placebo group; all patients in the rilotumumab group subsequently discontinued all study treatment. Median follow-up was 7·7 months (IQR 3·6–12·0) for patients in the rilotumumab group and 9·4 months (5·3–13·1) for patients in the placebo group. Median overall survival was 8·8 months (95% CI 7·7–10·2) in the rilotumumab group compared with 10·7 months (9·6–12·4) in the placebo group (stratified hazard ratio 1·34, 95% CI 1·10–1·63; p=0·003). The most common grade 3 or worse adverse events in the rilotumumab and placebo groups were neutropenia (86 [29%] of 298 patients vs 97 [32%] of 299 patients), anaemia (37 [12%] vs 43 [14%]), and fatigue (30 [10%] vs 35 [12%]). The frequency of serious adverse events was similar in the rilotumumab and placebo groups (142 [48%] vs 149 [50%]). More deaths due to adverse events occurred in the rilotumumab group than the placebo group (42 [14%] vs 31 [10%]). In the rilotumumab group, 33 (11%) of 298 patients had fatal adverse events due to disease progression, and nine (3%) had fatal events not due to disease progression. In the placebo group, 23 (8%) of 299 patients had fatal adverse events due to disease progression, and eight (3%) had fatal events not due to disease progression. Interpretation: Ligand-blocking inhibition of the MET pathway with rilotumumab is not effective in improving clinical outcomes in patients with MET-positive gastric or gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Funding: Amgen
Histopathological regression predicts treatment outcome in locally advanced esophagogastric adenocarcinoma( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Background: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (neoCTx) improves survival outcomes of patients with localised esophagogastric adenocarcinoma (EGA). This analysis evaluates the predictive value of histopathological response after neoCTx. Methods: A total of 461 patients with locally advanced EGA (≥T2 and/or N+) who received neoCTx followed by surgery were analysed: 314 (68.1%) with intestinal, 94 (20.4%) with diffuse and 53 (11.5%) with mixed histological type according to Lauren classification. Histopathological response evaluation was available for 363 patients and performed locally. This analysis evaluates the predictive value of histopathological subtype on histopathological response after neoCTx. Response was correlated with survival. Results: Median patients' age was 63 years, 79.8% were male. Tumours were localised in the stomach in 32.5% and EG junction in 67.5% of the patients. With a median follow-up of 49.4 months, median disease-free (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were 38.0 and 66.4 months, respectively. Pathological complete response (TRG1a) was 8.8% and combined complete and subtotal regression (TRG1a/b) was 27.3% for all patients. Around 9.2% of patients with intestinal type had a TRG1a compared with 6.2% with diffuse and 10.8% with mixed type. TRG1a/b rate was higher in intestinal (31.0%) than in diffuse (15.4%) and in mixed type (21.6%). For patients with intestinal type, 3-year DFS was 78.4% with TRG1a and 54.3% with other regression grades (p=0.031). All patients with diffuse and mixed type and TRG1a were disease free after 3 years compared with 31.1% (p=0.056) and 47.7% (p=0.044) with other regression grades. Conclusion: Histopathological subtype is predictive for histopathological response and outcome after neoCTx, with the highest response rates in intestinal differentiated EGA. Highlights: Histopathological complete/subtotal response is more frequent in intestinal-type esophagogastric adenocarcinoma (EGA). The histological subtype is predictive on histopathological response. Histopathological regression is a prognostic marker in EGA
The prognostic impact of epidermal growth factor receptor in patients with metastatic gastric cancer( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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Alternative Names
Al-Batran, Salah-Eddin

Batran, Salah E. al-

Languages
English (11)

German (6)