WorldCat Identities

Merilä, Juha

Overview
Works: 19 works in 22 publications in 1 language and 38 library holdings
Genres: Conference papers and proceedings 
Roles: Author, opp, Editor, Opponent
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Juha Merilä
Genetic and quantitative trait variation in natural bird populations by Juha Merilä( Book )

3 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 14 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Extinction thresholds( Book )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The biology and ecology of the common frog Rana temporaria in the subarctic by Merilä Juha( )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Extinction thresholds( Book )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Genetic consequences of fisheries and fisheries management : report from a multi-disciplinary workshop in Rönne, Bornholm, 25-26 October 2006 by Johan Dannewitz( Book )

2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report summarizes talks, discussions and conclusions from a multi-disciplinary workshop on genetic consequences of fisheries and fisheries management held in Rönne, Bornholm in October 2006. The workshop was intended for fishermen, scientists, decision makers, managers and other stakeholders from the Nordic countries. The main objectives were to improve communication between parties involved in fisheries management present current knowledge regarding genetic consequences of fisheries, and highlight the importance of including genetic/biological data in the management of exploited fish species agree upon recommendations on how genetic considerations could be implemented in management and decision making processes
Genetic and quantitative trait variation in natural bird populations by Juha Merilä( Book )

1 edition published in 1996 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Cross-generational costs of compensatory growth in nine-spined sticklebacks( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract Compensatory growth (CG) is a form of phenotypic plasticity allowing individuals' growth trajectories to rebound after a period of resource limitation, but little is known about the reproductive and cross-generational costs of CG. We studied the potential costs of CG by exposing female nine-spined sticklebacks Pungitius pungitius to 1) high (favourable), 2) low (stressful), and 3) recovery (initially stressful, subsequently favourable) feeding treatments, and quantified the effects of these treatments on female reproductive traits (clutch, egg and yolk size), and on the size of their offspring. The low feeding treatment reduced female size relative to the high and recovery feeding treatments, which produced equally large females. Hence, females from the recovery treatment demonstrated CG and full growth compensation. Feeding treatments had significant effects on clutch, yolk, egg and larval size, also when the effect of female size was controlled for. However, these effects came about mostly because females from the low feeding treatment produced small clutches with large eggs (containing little yolk) and larvae, whereas females from the recovery feeding treatment produced as large clutches, eggs (with similar amounts of yolk) and larvae as females from the high feeding treatment. Yet, structural equation modelling revealed that while a direct effect of female size on offspring size was positive in the low and high feeding treatments, it was negative in the recovery feeding treatment, independently of egg and clutch size. This indicates a cross-generational tradeoff between female and offspring sizes in the recovery feeding treatment. Also the tradeoff between clutch and larval size was more pronounced in recovery than in low or high feeding treatments. Hence, apart from demonstrating that environmental influences experienced by females during their development have the potential to influence their size, fecundity and reproductive traits, the results also provide evidence for complex cross-generational costs of recovery growth
Complete mitochondrial genome of the Sakhalin nine-spined stickleback Pungitius tymensis (Gasterosteiformes, Gasterosteidae)( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: The complete mitochondrial genome of the Sakhalin nine-spined stickleback Pungitius tymensis was determined using Illumina paired-end sequencing of genomic DNA. The genome sequence was 16 481 bp in length, consisting of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, two ribosomal RNA genes and a control region. The content and arrangement of the genes were identical to those of other Gasterosteidae species. P. tymensis was phylogenetically positioned with other Pungitius species ( P. kaibarae, P. pungitius and P. sinensis ) with a clear distinction from them. Nucleotide identity in the 37 genic regions ranged from 94.7% to 94.9% between P. tymensis and the other Pungitius species
Complete mitochondrial genome of the Greek nine-spined stickleback Pungitius hellenicus (Gasterosteiformes, Gasterosteidae)( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: The complete mitochondrial genome of the Greek nine-spined stickleback Pungitius hellenicus was obtained using Illumina high-throughput sequencing of genomic DNA. The genome was 16 713 bp long, and contained 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes and a control region. The arrangement of the genes was identical to that of other Gasterosteidae fishes. However, the control region of P. hellenicus contained three copies of imperfect repeated sequences (72–78 bp in single motifs), while P. pungitius and P. tymensis have one or two copies. Nucleotide identity between P. hellenicus and three other Pungitius species across all the 37 genic regions was 93.0% to 95.5%
Effects of ultraviolet-B radiation on common frog Rana temporaria embryos from along a latitudinal gradient by Maarit Pahkala( Book )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Increasing melanism along a latitudinal gradient in a widespread amphibian local adaptation, ontogenic or environmental plasticity? by Jussi S Alho( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

BackgroundThe thermal benefits of melanism in ectothermic animals are widely recognized, but relatively little is known about population differentiation in the degree of melanism along thermal gradients, and the relative contributions of genetic vs. environmental components into the level of melanism expressed. We investigated variation in the degree of melanism in the common frog (Rana temporaria; an active heliotherm thermoregulator) by comparing the degree of melanism (i) among twelve populations spanning over 1500 km long latitudinal gradient across the Scandinavian Peninsula and (ii) between two populations from latitudinal extremes subjected to larval temperature treatments in a common garden experiment. ResultsWe found that the degree of melanism increased steeply in the wild as a function of latitude. Comparison of the degree of population differentiation in melanism (PST) and neutral marker loci (FST) revealed that the PST> FST, indicating that the differences cannot be explained by random genetic drift alone. However, the latitudinal trend observed in the wild was not present in the common garden data, suggesting that the cline in nature is not attributable to direct genetic differences. ConclusionsAs straightforward local adaptation can be ruled out, the observed trend is likely to result from environment-driven phenotypic plasticity or ontogenetic plasticity coupled with population differences in age structure. In general, our results provide an example how phenotypic plasticity or even plain ontogeny can drive latitudinal clines and result in patterns perfectly matching the genetic differences expected under adaptive hypotheses
Evolution de la variation génétique et phénotypique au cours d'une invasion : le cas de Drosophila suzukii by Antoine Fraimout( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Biological invasions are a component of global change and have dramatic effects on ecosystems, agrosystems and human health. Nonetheless, these peculiar biological processes offer a great opportunity for the study of rapid phenotypic and genetic evolution, at an ecological timescale. Biological invasions often involve environmental and demographic constraints on populations, as well as strong effects of selection and drift. However, these species are among the most successful colonialists in nature, and their ability to respond to these constraints is remarkable. The evolutionary and adaptive potential of invasive populations have been proposed as facilitating factors of the success of invasions. Processes of genetic (i.e. changes in allele frequencies) and plastic (i.e. adjustment to environmental fluctuation through phenotypic plasticity) involved in the success of biological invasions are at the center of modern evolutionary biology. Here, we use the recent spread of the spotted-wing Drosophila suzukii to study the underlying mechanisms of response to selection potentially involved in the success of this global invasion. Analyzing patterns of neutral genetic variation allowed us to decipher the complex history of this worldwide invasion, and subsequently evaluate phenotypic divergence and evolution of quantitative genetic variation among ancestral and derived populations. We thus estimated the effects of selection and drift throughout this invasion and discuss their importance regarding the evolution of wing shape in this species. Finally, experimental protocols on the analysis of phenotypic plasticity as well as Species Distribution Modeling methods allowed us to discuss the influence of environmental fluctuations on the success of this invasion
Complete mitochondrial genomes of the smooth tail nine-spined sticklebacks Pungitius laevis (Gasterosteiformes, Gasterosteidae)( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: The complete mitochondrial genome sequences of three divergent lineages of the smooth tail nine-spined stickleback ( Pungitius laevis ) were obtained with massive parallel sequencing of their genomic DNA. The genome sequences were 16 574–16 580 bp long, and the gene order and contents were identical to those of other sequenced Pungitius mitogenomes. Although the mitogenome sequences of all three P. laevis lineages clustered within the genus Pungitius, they were clearly distinct and showed divergence comparable to that seen between some Pungitius species
Complete mitochondrial genome of the nine-spined stickleback Pungitius pungitius (Gasterosteiformes, Gasterosteidae)( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: The complete mitochondrial genome of the nine-spined stickleback Pungitius pungitius was obtained with Illumina sequencing of genomic DNA. The assembled mitogenome sequence was 16 582 bp long, and the gene number, order and contents were identical to those of other sequenced Pungitius mitogenomes. The complete mitogenome of P. pungitius from its European range can provide an important template for further phylogenetic and population genetic studies of the Pungitius species complex
Evolutionary constraints by Juha Merilä( Book )

1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Intraspecific diversity of pike ( Esox lucius ) in the Baltic Sea and new insights on thermoregulation in fish by Oscar Nordahl( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Fish display a fascinating variation in behavior, morphology and physiology among species, among individuals within species, and within individuals over time. A central quest in ecology and evolution is to understand causes and consequences of such variation. This thesis aims to contribute to this knowledge by: (1) investigating the evolutionary processes that shape intraspecific variation among sympatric subpopulations of pike in coastal areas of the Baltic Sea; and (2) exploring whether fish can utilize sun-basking to regulate body temperature and whether this has any consequences for fitness. Identifying barriers that delineate populations is a first step towards evaluating the evolutionary origin of intraspecific variation. This thesis reports on genetic population structures among co-existing pike in the coastal Baltic Sea separated by homing behavior, different spawning strategies and geographic barriers. Field studies revealed that these subpopulations also show phenotypic divergence in reproductive and meristic traits. Experimental studies suggested that differentiation among subpopulations likely was a result of divergent selection and local adaptations to spawning grounds. These adaptations that may further reinforce barriers among subpopulations due to a reduced success of immigrant genotypes. For the second aim of the thesis, we first studied seasonal and diel patterns of activity and vertical migration among the Baltic Sea pike. The results suggested that pike exposed themselves to sunlight during spring and summer, and that body temperatures were positively correlated with sun exposure during these basking events. This was followed by experimental studies on inanimate physical models and a field study on carp which demonstrated that fish can become warmer than ambient water when exposed to sun light, a previously overlooked mechanism for fish thermoregulation, and that the heat gain was positively correlated with growth. This thesis contributes to our understanding of the origin and maintenance of intraspecific variation among coexisting populations with direct implications for management of pike. It also establishes sun-basking as a novel mechanism for fish to obtain body temperatures in excess of ambient water which could motivate adaptations, both evolutionary and plastic, that optimize heat gain, affect spatiotemporal distributions and biotic interaction within and among species
Extinction thresholds( )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Complete mitochondrial genome of the Ukrainian nine-spined stickleback Pungitius platygaster (Gasterosteiformes, Gasterosteidae)( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: The complete mitochondrial genome of the Ukrainian nine-spined stickleback Pungitius platygaster was obtained using massive parallel sequencing of genomic DNA. The mitogenome sequence was 16 570 bp long, and the gene order and contents were identical to those of other sequenced Pungitius mitogenomes. In a phylogenetic analysis, the mitogenome of P. platygaster clustered with other Pungitius mitogenomes, yet being clearly distinct from those of P. pungitius, P. sinensis and P. kaibarae
Estinction thresolds : insight from ecology, genetics, epidemiology and behaviour( Book )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Audience level: 0.86 (from 0.74 for Extinction ... to 1.00 for Estinction ...)

Alternative Names
Juha Merilä Finnish zoologist

Juha Merilä Fins onderzoeker (1965-)

Juha Merilä investigador finlandés

Languages
English (22)