Front cover image for Rape, race, and redemption: A northern translation of the southern script in the 1920 Duluth lynching

Rape, race, and redemption: A northern translation of the southern script in the 1920 Duluth lynching

Lynching in the United States has been primarily identified with the South. By 1920, mob violence in the South was highly ritualized and provided a blueprint for the sequence of events: a lynching script. If one considers solely the location of the incident, the Duluth lynching appears as an anomaly. Placed in a larger context, however, the Duluth racial violence was one example of a Northern translation of the Southern lynching script. A case study of the Duluth violence offers a detailed analysis of the racial and gender stereotypes, roles, and beliefs that supported the lynching and provides evidence that this ideology was a national, not simply a Southern, phenomenon. I argue that this shared belief system provided the framework for racial violence that, given the right circumstances, could be enacted in any community
Downloadable Article, English, 2007