Front cover image for Music teacher attrition: A survey of the reasons doctoral music education students left K-12 teaching

Music teacher attrition: A survey of the reasons doctoral music education students left K-12 teaching

This study surveyed current doctoral music education students to examine if the reasons they left teaching. Participants were also asked if and how they planned to address music teacher attrition variables in future music methods classes. Participants were 91 doctoral music education students from 23 universities at any stage of their coursework. Using a researcher-designed survey, participants answered questions regarding 25 teacher attrition variables and 18 teacher background variables. Means indicated that the influential items for doctoral music education students to leave K-12 teaching were career development, desire to share expertise, desire to engage in research, desire to become a better musician, and financial aid offered from the doctoral program. No negative reasons were highly influential in their decision to leave K-12 teaching. However, exploratory factor analysis revealed that the following factors may explain additional variance: job stress, home and health concerns, support, scheduling conflicts, salary, professional development, desire to be a better music educator, and recommendation from a colleague. Participants did comment on 16 of the 25 attrition variables as topics they would address with future music education students. Those named most were burnout, lack of administrative support, scheduling difficulties, lack of preparation for diversity, desire for career development, desire to share expertise with others, and student musical dissatisfaction
Thesis, Dissertation, English, 2016
ProQuest Dissertations & Theses, Ann Arbor, 2016