Front cover image for Shoah und Prozess : der Regiestil in den Dokumentarfilmen von Claude Lanzmann und Eberhard Fechner

Shoah und Prozess : der Regiestil in den Dokumentarfilmen von Claude Lanzmann und Eberhard Fechner

Compares Lanzmann's film "Shoah" (1985) with Fechner's "Der Prozess" (1984). Examines to what extent the personal attitudes of the directors find expression in the films. Lanzmann focuses on ethics, while Fechner emphasizes history through the view of a spectactor. Lanzmann waives archival material; for him, words, gestures, and the mental state of the survivors are the proof of the reality of the horror. Fechner's film, dealing with the murder of at least one-quarter of a million people in the Majdanek concentration camp in 1941-44, reconstructs the longest trial in German legal history which took place in Düsseldorf between 1975-81. Fifteen men and women, former camp guards, were accused of having participated in the murder of thousands. The film consists of interviews with defendants, witnesses, judges, prosecutors, defense counsels, historians, criminals, and victims. The film is a kind of "counter" trial and an interpretation of the original proceedings. The accused, who hardly said a word during the original trial, eagerly volunteered information in front of the camera. Employing a mosaic-like technique and hard confrontational editing, Fechner allowed both criminals and victims to reveal themselves. (From the Bibliography of the Vidal Sassoon International Center for the Study of Antisemitism)
Print Book, German, 2008
VDM Verlag Dr. Müller, Saarbrücken, 2008