Aboriginal newspapers : their contribution to the emergence of an alternative public sphere in Canada (Book, 1996) [WorldCat.org]
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Aboriginal newspapers : their contribution to the emergence of an alternative public sphere in Canada
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Aboriginal newspapers : their contribution to the emergence of an alternative public sphere in Canada

Author: Shannon Avison; Concordia University (Montréal, Québec).; Concordia University (Montréal, Québec). Department of Communication Studies.
Publisher: 1996.
Dissertation: M.A. Dept. of Communication Studies, Concordia University 1996
Edition/Format:   Thesis/dissertation : Thesis/dissertation : Manuscript   Archival Material : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
This thesis explores the contribution of the regional Indian, Metis and Inuit newspapers to the development of an alternative political public sphere for Aboriginal peoples in Canada. It argues that although the development of the newspapers was an important aspect of the political and cultural development, these newspapers were, to use Habermas' terminology, "feudalized" by the political organizations that created  Read more...
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Genre/Form: masters theses
doctoral dissertations
theses
dissertations
Academic theses
Thèses et écrits académiques
Material Type: Thesis/dissertation, Manuscript, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Archival Material, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Shannon Avison; Concordia University (Montréal, Québec).; Concordia University (Montréal, Québec). Department of Communication Studies.
OCLC Number: 1108667201
Notes: "August 1996."
Description: viii, 225 leaves ; 29 cm
Responsibility: Shannon Avison.

Abstract:

This thesis explores the contribution of the regional Indian, Metis and Inuit newspapers to the development of an alternative political public sphere for Aboriginal peoples in Canada. It argues that although the development of the newspapers was an important aspect of the political and cultural development, these newspapers were, to use Habermas' terminology, "feudalized" by the political organizations that created them, the Canadian state that funded them and the marketplace that determines their fate today. Using Jurgen Habermas' concept of the public sphere, this thesis considers the contribution that these publications made to the process of public opinion at the regional and national levels in Canada. It concludes that the regional newspapers did contribute to the national Aboriginal public sphere, but that state policies and financial exigencies limited their contribution and prevented them from realizing their full potential in the lives of Aboriginal Canadians.

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