Academia's golden age : universities in Massachusetts, 1945-1970 (Book, 1992) [WorldCat.org]
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Academia's golden age : universities in Massachusetts, 1945-1970

Author: Richard M Freeland
Publisher: New York : Oxford University Press, 1992.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
The quarter century following World War II was a "golden age" for American universities. Students enrolled in record numbers, financial support was readily available, and campuses flourished in a climate of public approval. In the mid-1960s, however, the picture began to change.
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Genre/Form: History
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Richard M Freeland
ISBN: 0195054644 9780195054644
OCLC Number: 23648896
Description: xii, 532 pages ; 25 cm
Contents: pt. 1. Contexts. 1. Academic Development and Social Change: Higher Education in Massachusetts before 1945. Prologue: Three Centuries of College Building, 1636-1929. Historical Dynamics of Academic Change. The Long Pause, 1929-1945: University Development in Depression and War. 2. The World Transformed: A Golden Age for American Universities, 1945-1970. Academic Ideas and Developmental Opportunities in the Postwar Years. The Three Revolutions: Enrollments, Finances, and Faculty. Disarray and Reassessment: A Second Debate on Academic Values --
pt. 2. Institutions. 3. Emergence of the Modern Research University: Harvard and M.I.T., 1945-1970. From Depression to Prosperity: The Early Postwar Years. Consolidating the New Focus: Research and Graduate Education. The Economics of Academic Progress. Undergraduate Education in the Research University. Organizational Dimensions of Academic Change. The Old Order Changes. 4. Evolution of the College-centered University: Tufts and Brandeis, 1945-1970. The Postwar Years at Tufts. The Founding of Brandeis. Institutional Mobility in the Early Golden Age. The 1960s at Tufts. The 1960s at Brandeis. Organization, Leadership, and Institutional Change. Dilemmas of the College-centered University. 5. Transformation of the Urban University: Boston University, Boston College, and Northeastern, 1945-1972. Postwar Boom: Veterans, Growth, and Capital Accumulation. Shifting Emphasis in the 1950s. The "Bonanza Years" at Boston College. The "Blooming" at Northeastern. The 1960s at Boston University. Institutional Mobility and Organizational Form. The Irony of the Urban University. The Good Times End. 6. From State College to University System: The University of Massachusetts, 1945-1973. The Early Postwar Years. UMass in the 1950s. UMass in the 1960s. Academic Organization and Political Systems. From Rapid Growth to Steady State --
pt. 3. Patterns. 7. The Institutional Complex and Academic Adaptation, 1945-1980. The Institutional Complex in Action: 1945-1970. Adaptations of the 1970s. The Institutional Complex and the Reform Agenda.
Responsibility: Richard M. Freeland.
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Abstract:

This study examines post-World War II developments in American higher education by closely scrutinizing eight universities in the Boston, Massachusetts area that exemplify all the major trends.  Read more...

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A magnificent work of scholarship....No book tells more about the dirty little secrets of universities as they jockey to enhance their prestige and resources. No book tells more about the Read more...

 
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