Adaptation to climate change and potash mining in Saskatchewan : case study from the Qu'Appelle River Watershed (eBook, 2014) [WorldCat.org]
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Adaptation to climate change and potash mining in Saskatchewan : case study from the Qu'Appelle River Watershed

Author: J Pittman; Tristan Pearce; James David Ford; Canada. Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation Division,
Publisher: Ottawa, Ontario : Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation Division, Natural Resources Canada, Beaconsfield, Quebec : Canadian Electronic Library, 2013. 2014.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : National government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Climate change is expected to have significant implications for Canada's economy. Many of these implications are cross-cutting (e.g. changing water availability, excessive moisture, extreme weather events) and will affect a number of key economic sectors, including the potash mining industry, which employed 5,041 Canadians and contributed $6.7 billion to Canadian exports in 2011 (NRCan 2012). To assess the readiness  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Electronic books
Material Type: Document, Government publication, National government publication, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: J Pittman; Tristan Pearce; James David Ford; Canada. Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation Division,
OCLC Number: 899005157
Notes: "December 2013."
Description: 1 online resource (19 pages) : illustrations, map
Contents: Introduction --
Case study description --
Methods --
How are companies currently adapting to climate change and variability? --
Investing in infrastructure --
Water reuse and recycling --
Innovative and alternative water sourcing --
Proactive planning --
What's driving adaptation? --
Regulations and standards --
Economics --
Experience --
Voluntary mechanisms --
How are companies tracking success of adaptation actions? --
Adaptation lessons from the frontlines --
Expect the unexpected --
Consider cumulative impacts --
The importance of collaboration --
How could governments help support climate change adaptation? --
Enhance research capacity --
Bridge science and industry --
Effective communication --
Conclusion --
Bibliography --
Appendix 1: interview guide.
Responsibility: [J. Pittman, T. Pearce, J. Ford] ; report to Natural Resources Canada and the Adaptation Platform Mining Working Group.
More information:

Abstract:

Climate change is expected to have significant implications for Canada's economy. Many of these implications are cross-cutting (e.g. changing water availability, excessive moisture, extreme weather events) and will affect a number of key economic sectors, including the potash mining industry, which employed 5,041 Canadians and contributed $6.7 billion to Canadian exports in 2011 (NRCan 2012). To assess the readiness of the potash mining sector for climate change and support adaptation, decision makers need to know the nature of vulnerability, in terms of who and what are vulnerable, to what stresses, and in what way, and also what is the capacity of the system to adapt to changing conditions (Smit et al. 2000; Turner et al. 2003). This research examines climate change vulnerability and adaptation in a case study of the potash industry in Saskatchewan's Qu'Appelle River Watershed and aims to shed light on ways to enhance the competitiveness and adaptive capacity of the industry under a changing climate. The report begins by providing background information on the case study and research methods. It then presents the results, focusing on existing adaptation actions, the drivers of these actions, how the progress of these actions towards meeting desired goals is tracked, lessons learned for future climate change adaptation, and the potential role of government in increasing the industry's adaptive capacity. Finally, the main conclusions from this work are presented.

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