Agayuliyararput : kegginaqut, kangiit-llu = Our way of making prayer : Yup'ik masks and the stories they tell (Book, 1996) [WorldCat.org]
skip to content
Agayuliyararput : kegginaqut, kangiit-llu = Our way of making prayer : Yup'ik masks and the stories they tell Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Agayuliyararput : kegginaqut, kangiit-llu = Our way of making prayer : Yup'ik masks and the stories they tell

Author: Marie Meade; Ann Fienup-Riordan; Anchorage Museum of History and Art.
Publisher: Seattle : Anchorage Museum of History and Art in association with the University of Washington Press, ©1996.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Drawing on the remembrances of elders who were born in the early 1900s and saw the last masked Yup'ik dances before missionary efforts forced their decline, Agayuliyararput is a collection of first-person accounts of the rich culture surrounding Yup'ik masks. Stories by thirty-three elders from all over southwestern Alaska, presented in parallel Yup'ik and English texts, include a wealth of information about the  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Marie Meade; Ann Fienup-Riordan; Anchorage Museum of History and Art.
ISBN: 0295975091 9780295975092
OCLC Number: 33335675
Language Note: Includes some text in Yup'ik.
Description: xxi, 236 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Contents: Acknowledgments / Marie Meade --
"Our Way of Making a Book" / Ann Fienup-Riordan --
Yup'ik Elder Contributors --
1. Opening the Book --
2. Masks and the Traditional Ceremonial Cycle --
3. The Reasons Masks Were Made --
4. Masks and the Stories They Tell --
5. In the Qasgiq --
6. Suppression and Revival of Masked Dancing --
7. Making a Mask --
8. Presenting a Mask: Its Song and Dance --
9. Yukon Stories, Yukon Masks --
10. Kuskokwim Stories, Kuskokwim Masks --
11. Coastal Stories, Coastal Masks --
Yup'ik Transcription and Translation. Yup'ik elder contributors (name, residence, birthplace, and birthdate): William Tyson, Anchorage, Pastuli River, 1916 --
Andy Kinzy, St. Marys, Qissunaq River, 1911 --
Mary Mike, St. Marys, Uksuqalleq, 1912 --
Justina Mike, St. Marys, Caniliaq, 1912 --
Jasper Louise, St. Marys, Anagciq, 1916 --
Johnny Thompson, St. Marys, Tuutalgaq, 1923 --
Pauline Akaran, Emmonak, birthplace not given, birthdate not given --
Cecilia Foxie, Emmonak, Penguq, 1912 --
Alma Keyes, Emmonak, Pastuli River, 1922 --
Willie Kamkoff, Emmonak, Nunapiggluugaq, 1923 --
Paul John, Toksook Bay, Cevv'arneq, 1929 --
Martha Mann, Kwigillingok, Qipneq, 1910 --
Julia Azean, Kongiganak, Urutuq, 1918 --
Charlie David, Kongiganak, Anuuraaq, 1915 --
Elena Phillip, Kongiganak, Esriq, birthdate not given --
Mary Worm, Kongiganak, Cevv'arneq, 1898 --
Joseph Evan, Napaskiak, Paingaq, 1906 --
Nickolai Berlin, Nunapitchuk, Qikertaq, Eek Island, 1912 --
Dick Andrew, Bethel, Kayalivik, 1909 --
Kay Hendrickson, Bethel, Ciguralek, Nunivak Island, 1910 --
Elsie Tommy, Newtok, birthplace not given, 1922.
Other Titles: Our way of making prayer
Responsibility: transcribed and translated by Marie Meade ; edited by Ann Fienup-Riordan.

Abstract:

Drawing on the remembrances of elders who were born in the early 1900s and saw the last masked Yup'ik dances before missionary efforts forced their decline, Agayuliyararput is a collection of first-person accounts of the rich culture surrounding Yup'ik masks. Stories by thirty-three elders from all over southwestern Alaska, presented in parallel Yup'ik and English texts, include a wealth of information about the creation and function of masks and the environment in which they flourished. The full-length, unannotated stories are complete with features of oral storytelling such as repetition and digression; the language of the English translation follows the Yup'ik idiom as closely as possible. Reminiscences about the cultural setting of masked dancing are grouped into chapters on the traditional Yup'ik ceremonial cycle, the use of masks, life in the qasgiq (communal men's house), the suppression and revival of masked dancing, maskmaking, and dance and song. Stories are grouped geographically, representing the Yukon, Kuskokwim, and coastal areas. The subjects of the stories and the masks made to accompany them are the Arctic animals, beings, and natural forces on which humans depended. This book will be treasured by the Yup'ik residents of southwestern Alaska and an international audience of linguists, folklorists, anthropologists, and art historians.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.