American Errancy: Empire, Sublimity & Modern Poetry. (Book, 2006) [WorldCat.org]
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American Errancy: Empire, Sublimity & Modern Poetry.
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American Errancy: Empire, Sublimity & Modern Poetry.

Author: Justin Quinn
Publisher: [Place of publication not identified] : University College Dublin Press, 2006.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
American Errancy is a wide-ranging study of the connection between ideology and the sublime in the work of twentieth-century poets, all American with two, or perhaps three important exceptions. The poets chosen are in debate with the Romantic individualism of Emerson--some reject it outright, but the remainder have devoted substantial work to adjusting to the changed circumstances of their century. --University  Read more...
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Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Justin Quinn
ISBN: 1904558356 9781904558354
OCLC Number: 779976452
Notes: Foreign, Prose.
Description: 186 pages
Contents: Introduction; American Errancy; T. S. Eliot's Journey Home; Geoffrey Hill in America; Coteries and the Sublime in Allen Ginsberg; Thom Gunn's American Dispersals; A. R. Ammons's Cold War Sublime; Empire, Sublimity and the Look of Things in Amy Clampitt; Robert Pinsky and the Ends of America; Jorie Graham's Manifest Destiny; Works Cited; Index

Abstract:

American Errancy is a wide-ranging study of the connection between ideology and the sublime in the work of twentieth-century poets, all American with two, or perhaps three important exceptions. The poets chosen are in debate with the Romantic individualism of Emerson--some reject it outright, but the remainder have devoted substantial work to adjusting to the changed circumstances of their century. --University College Dublin Press.

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"T. S. Eliot praised Henry James for having a mind so fine 'that no idea could violate it'. Quinn shows that American poets can deal with ideas without being violated by them. This study ... belongs Read more...

 
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