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American Narcissism The Myth of National Superiority

Author: Wilber W Caldwell
Publisher: New York Algora Publishing Ann Arbor, Michigan ProQuest 2007
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Nationalism is not unique to America: it was invented with the birth of modern nations. But nationalism is unique in America. Americans conceive themselves and their nation to be incontrovertibly superior to the other peoples and nations of the earth. When does national pride cross the invisible boundary that separates benign patriotism and malignant nationalism?. Historically, American notions of superiority spring  Read more...
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Details

Material Type: Document
Document Type: Book, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Wilber W Caldwell
ISBN: 9780875864693 0875864694
OCLC Number: 1020499536
Accession No: (DE-599)HEB397774087 (OCoLC)1020499536
Description: 1 Online-Ressource (193 pages)

Abstract:

Nationalism is not unique to America: it was invented with the birth of modern nations. But nationalism is unique in America. Americans conceive themselves and their nation to be incontrovertibly superior to the other peoples and nations of the earth. When does national pride cross the invisible boundary that separates benign patriotism and malignant nationalism?. Historically, American notions of superiority spring from myths of the unique regenerative power of the new land; from visions of chosen-ness, mission and high destiny; from the indelible legends of frontier self-sufficiency; from the confidence and self-reliance needed to succeed as immigrants; from a powerful sense of AmericaÂ's isolation and uniqueness; from the realization of abundance; and finally from the perceived universality of American ideology. This predisposes us to a distinctively virulent strain of nationalism unlike that found in almost any other modern nation. As the unipolar moment fades into memory, this sense of unquestionable superiority Â- expressed through politics and foreign policy Â- does not play well before the global audience. In fact, it never did. Drawing on sources from within the academic disciplines of history, sociology, political science and foreign affairs, the book seeks to decode scholarly jargon and lay bare this corner of the American mind for the benefit of a wider readership.

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