The American robot : a cultural history (eBook, 2020) [WorldCat.org]
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The American robot : a cultural history
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The American robot : a cultural history

Author: Dustin A Abnet
Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2020.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"As Dustin Abnet shows, the robot-whether automaton, Mechanical Turk, cyborg, or iPhone, whether humanized machine or mechanized human being-has long been a fraught embodiment of human fears. Abnet investigates, moreover, how the discourse of the robot has reinforced social and economic inequalities as well as fantasies of social control. "Robots" as a trope are not necessarily mechanical but are rather embodiments  Read more...
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Details

Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Abnet, Dustin A.
American Robot : A Cultural History.
Chicago : University of Chicago Press, ©2020
Material Type: Document
Document Type: Book, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Dustin A Abnet
ISBN: 022669285X 9780226692852 022669271X 9780226692715
OCLC Number: 1264856806
Description: 1 online resource (385 pages)
Contents: Intro --
Contents --
Introduction: An Intimate and Distant Machine --
Part 1. God and Demon, 1790-1910 --
1. The Republican Automaton --
2. Humanizing the Industrial Machine --
3. Mechanizing Men --
Part 2. Masters and Slaves, 1910-1945 --
4. Symbolizing the Machine Age --
5. Building the Slaves of Tomorrow --
6. Conditioning the Robot's Brain --
7. A War against the Machine Age --
Part 3. Playfellow and Protector, 1945-2019 --
8. Preserving American Innocence --
9. The Postindustrial Gift --
10. Cheerful Robots --
Epilogue: The American Robot --
Acknowledgments --
Notes --
Index
Responsibility: Dustin A. Abnet.

Abstract:

"As Dustin Abnet shows, the robot-whether automaton, Mechanical Turk, cyborg, or iPhone, whether humanized machine or mechanized human being-has long been a fraught embodiment of human fears. Abnet investigates, moreover, how the discourse of the robot has reinforced social and economic inequalities as well as fantasies of social control. "Robots" as a trope are not necessarily mechanical but are rather embodiments of quasi humanity, exhibiting a mix of human and nonhuman characteristics. Such figures are troubling to dominant discourses, which cannot easily assimilate them or identify salient boundaries. The robot lurks beneath the fears that fracture society"--

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