An anthropology of landscape : the extraordinary in the ordinary (eBook, 2017) [WorldCat.org]
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An anthropology of landscape : the extraordinary in the ordinary
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An anthropology of landscape : the extraordinary in the ordinary

Author: Christopher Y Tilley; Kate Cameron-Daum
Publisher: London : UCL Press, 2017.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
An Anthropology of Landscape tells the fascinating story of a heathland landscape in south-west England and the way different individuals and groups engage with it. Based on a long-term anthropological study, the book emphasises four individual themes: embodied identities, the landscape as a sensuous material form that is acted upon and in turn acts on people, the landscape as contested, and its relation to emotion.  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Tilley, Christopher.
Anthropology of Landscape : The Extraordinary in the Ordinary.
London : UCL Press, ©2017
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Christopher Y Tilley; Kate Cameron-Daum
ISBN: 9781911307433 1911307436 9781911307464 1911307460 9781911307488 1911307487 9781911307471 1911307479 9781911307457 1911307452
OCLC Number: 973675279
Description: 1 online resource (xix, 325 pages) : illustrations
Contents: 1 The anthropology of landscape: materiality, embodiment, contestation and emotion; Introduction; Materiality; Embodiment; Contestation; Emotion; The Pebblebed heathland landscape of East Devon; Social groups and the research field; Conclusions; Part I The heathland as taskscape; 2 Managing the Pebblebed heathlands; Introduction; Clinton Devon Estates and the heathland; Visions of the heathland and their management; From car parks to conservation site. Perspectives of conservation professionals; The archaeological perspective; What time is this heath?; A contested landscape; Conflicts in conservation management; Topsoil scraping moratorium meeting: fieldwork notes; Swaling; Grazing; Conservation grazing, heathland fencing and the consultation process for the future of the heathlands; Conserving the heathlands and managing people; Dogs and dog mess; Public access and its management; Conclusions; 3 Bushes that move: the Royal Marines; Recruits and the training programme; The Woodbury Common Training Area; Place names and reference points. Bodily experience in the landscape; Ways of moving; Looking and seeing; The weapon, kit and the body; Mind and body; Training, landscape and endurance; The endurance course; Conservation issues; Landscape, embodiment and memory; Conclusions: in and out of landscape; 4 Environmentalists: the giving and the taking away; Conflict; Shape-shifting; Management, volunteers and environmentalism on the heathlands; The politics of environmentalism; Environmentalists and the Pebblebed heathlands; Heathland wildlife; Volunteer groups; Why volunteer?; Giving and taking away; Starting work; Tasks and tools. Butterflies; Damselflies; Nightjars; Feelings about volunteering; Feelings about the heathland; Conclusions; 5 Quarrying pebbles; Conclusions; Part II The landscape as leisurescape; 6 Introduction: the public and the heathland; Visitor frequency; Reasons for visiting the heathlands; Length of visit; Visits to other areas of the heathlands; Likes and dislikes; The archaeological and geological landscape; Nature, conservation and threatened species; Describing the heathland; Conclusions; 7 Modes of movement through the landscape: cycling and horse riding. Cycling: an embodied identity of challenge and pleasure; Mountain bikes and riding apparel; Riding groups; Routes through the landscape; Night riders; Differences between day and night riding; Comparisons with walking; Relationships with the heathland; Relationship with other users; Horse riding, co-being and the landscape; Embodiment and landscape; Conclusions; 8 The cry of the Commons: walking through furze; Anthropological aspects; A temporary dwelling; The cry of the commons: motivations for walking; The walkers; The physicality of walking; The character of the heathland landscape; Engagement with the heathland.
Responsibility: Christopher Tilley & Kate Cameron-Daum.

Abstract:

An Anthropology of Landscape tells the fascinating story of a heathland landscape in south-west England and the way different individuals and groups engage with it. Based on a long-term anthropological study, the book emphasises four individual themes: embodied identities, the landscape as a sensuous material form that is acted upon and in turn acts on people, the landscape as contested, and its relation to emotion. The landscape is discussed in relation to these themes as both 'taskscape' and 'leisurescape', and from the perspective of different user groups. The book makes an innovative contribution to landscape studies and will appeal to all those interested in nature conservation, historic preservation, the politics of nature, the politics of identity, and an anthropology of Britain.

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