API Design for C++ (eBook, 2011) [WorldCat.org]
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API Design for C++
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API Design for C++

Author: Martin Reddy; TotalBoox,; TBX,
Publisher: Elsevier Science 2011.
Edition/Format:   eBook : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
API Design for C++ provides a comprehensive discussion of Application Programming Interface (API) development, from initial design through implementation, testing, documentation, release, versioning, maintenance, and deprecation. The book focuses on the issues of designing APIs for a single language (C++), which remains one of the most widely used programming languages for large software projects. The book also  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Software Development & Engineering; Programming Languages; Programming
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Martin Reddy; TotalBoox,; TBX,
ISBN: 9780123850041 0123850045
OCLC Number: 969038112
Description: 1 online resource
Contents: Front Cover; API Design for C++; Copyright; Contents; Foreword; Preface; Why You Should Read This Book; Who is the Target Audience; Focusing On C++; Conventions; Book Web Site; Acknowledgments; Author Biography; Chapter 1: Introduction; 1.1 What are Application Programming Interfaces?; 1.1.1 Contracts and Contractors; 1.1.2 APIs in; 1.2 What's Different About Api Design?; 1.3 Why Should you Use APIs?; 1.3.1 More Robust Code; 1.3.2 Code Reuse; 1.3.3 Parallel Development; 1.4 When Should you Avoid APIs?; 1.5 Api Examples; 1.5.1 Layers of APIs; 1.5.2 A Real-Life Example 1.6 File Formats and Network Protocols 1.7 About this Book; Chapter 2: Qualities; 2.1 Model the Problem Domain; 2.1.1 Provide a Good Abstraction; 2.1.2 Model the Key Objects; 2.2 Hide Implementation Details; 2.2.1 Physical Hiding: Declaration versus Definition; 2.2.2 Logical Hiding: Encapsulation; 2.2.3 Hide Member Variables; 2.2.4 Hide Implementation Methods; 2.2.5 Hide Implementation Classes; 2.3 Minimally Complete; 2.3.1 Don't Overpromise; 2.3.2 Add Virtual Functions Judiciously; 2.3.3 Convenience APIs; 2.4 Easy to Use; 2.4.1 Discoverable; 2.4.2 Difficult to Misuse; 2.4.3 Consistent 2.4.4 Orthogonal 2.4.5 Robust Resource Allocation; 2.4.6 Platform Independent; 2.5 Loosely Coupled; 2.5.1 Coupling by Name Only; 2.5.2 Reducing Class Coupling; 2.5.3 Intentional Redundancy; 2.5.4 Manager Classes; 2.5.5 Callbacks, Observers, and Notifications; Callbacks; Observers; Notifications; 2.6 Stable, Documented, and Tested; Chapter 3: Patterns; 3.1 Pimpl Idiom; 3.1.1 Using Pimpl; 3.1.2 Copy Semantics; 3.1.3 Pimpl and Smart Pointers; 3.1.4 Advantages of Pimpl; 3.1.5 Disadvantages of Pimpl; 3.1.6 Opaque Pointers in C; 3.2 Singleton; 3.2.1 Implementing Singletons in 3.2.2 Making Singletons Thread Safe 3.2.3 Singleton versus Dependency Injection; 3.2.4 Singleton versus Monostate; 3.2.5 Singleton versus Session State; 3.3 Factory Methods; 3.3.1 Abstract Base Classes; 3.3.2 Simple Factory Example; 3.3.3 Extensible Factory Example; 3.4 API Wrapping Patterns; 3.4.1 The Proxy Pattern; 3.4.2 The Adapter Pattern; 3.4.3 The Façade Pattern; 3.5 Observer Pattern; 3.5.1 Model-View-Controller; 3.5.2 Implementing the Observer Pattern; 3.5.3 Push versus Pull Observers; Chapter 4: Design; 4.1 A Case for Good Design; 4.1.1 Accruing Technical Debt 4.1.2 Paying Back the Debt 4.1.3 Design for the Long Term; 4.2 Gathering Functional Requirements; 4.2.1 What Are Functional Requirements?; 4.2.2 Example Functional Requirements; 4.2.3 Maintaining the Requirements; 4.3 Creating Use Cases; 4.3.1 Developing Use Cases; 4.3.2 Use Case Templates; 4.3.3 Writing Good Use Cases; 4.3.4 Requirements and Agile Development; 4.4 Elements of Api Design; 4.5 Architecture Design; 4.5.1 Developing an Architecture; 4.5.2 Architecture Constraints; 4.5.3 Identifying Major Abstractions; 4.5.4 Inventing Key Objects; 4.5.5 Architectural Patterns

Abstract:

API Design for C++ provides a comprehensive discussion of Application Programming Interface (API) development, from initial design through implementation, testing, documentation, release, versioning, maintenance, and deprecation. The book focuses on the issues of designing APIs for a single language (C++), which remains one of the most widely used programming languages for large software projects. The book also covers specialized API topics, such as creating scripting and plug-in APIs, with emphasis on API design. A discussion on testing strategies concentrates on automated API testing techniques rather than attempting to include end-user application testing techniques such as GUI testing, system testing, or manual testing. The book will be helpful to new programmers who understand the fundamentals of C++ and who want to advance their design skills, as well as senior engineers and software architects seeking to gain new expertise to complement their existing talents. Three specific groups of readers are targeted: practicing software engineers and architects, technical managers, and students and educators. The only book that teaches the strategies of C++ API development, including design, versioning, documentation, testing, scripting, and extensibility. Extensive code examples illustrate each concept, with fully functional examples and working source code for experimentation available online. Covers various API styles and patterns with a focus on practical and efficient designs for large-scale long-term projects.

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