Architecture and suburbia : from English villa to American dream house, 1690-2000 (Book, 2005) [WorldCat.org]
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Architecture and suburbia : from English villa to American dream house, 1690-2000

Author: John Archer
Publisher: Minneapolis ; London : University of Minesota Press, cop. 2005.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Traces the evolution of the modern American dream house from seventeenth-century England to the present. The American suburban dream house-a single-family, detached dwelling, frequently clustered in tight rows and cul-de-sacs-has been attacked for some time as homogeneous and barren, yet the suburbs are home to half of the American population. Architectural historian John Archer suggests the endurance of the ideal  Read more...
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Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: John Archer
ISBN: 0816643032 9780816643035
OCLC Number: 912454554
Notes: Índice.
Description: XX, 470 p. : il., fot., planos ; 26 cm
Responsibility: John Archer.

Abstract:

Traces the evolution of the modern American dream house from seventeenth-century England to the present. The American suburban dream house-a single-family, detached dwelling, frequently clustered in tight rows and cul-de-sacs-has been attacked for some time as homogeneous and barren, yet the suburbs are home to half of the American population. Architectural historian John Archer suggests the endurance of the ideal house is deeply rooted in the notions of privacy, property, and selfhood that were introduced in late seventeenth-century England and became the foundation of the American nation and identity. Spanning four centuries, Architecture and Suburbia explores phenomena ranging from household furnishings and routines to the proliferation of the dream house in parallel with Cold War politics. Beginning with John Locke, whose Enlightenment philosophy imagined individuals capable of self-fulfillment, Archer examines the eighteenth-century British bourgeois villa and the earliest London suburbs. He recounts how early American homeowners used houses to establish social status and how twentieth-century Americans continued to flock to single-family houses in the suburbs, encouraged by patriotism, fueled by consumerism, and resisting disdain by disaffected youths, designers, and intellectuals. Finally, he recognizes "hybridized" or increasingly diverse American suburbs as the dynamic basis for a strengthened social fabric. From Enlightenment philosophy to rap lyrics, from the rise of a mercantile economy to discussions over neighborhoods, sprawl, and gated communities, Archer addresses the past, present, and future of the American dream house.

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