Arms and influence, (Book, 1966) [WorldCat.org]
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Arms and influence,
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Arms and influence,

Author: Thomas C Schelling; Harvard University. Center for International Affairs.
Publisher: New Haven, Yale University Press, 1966.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Traditionally, Americans have viewed war as an alternative to diplomacy, and military strategy as the science of victory. Today, however, in our world of nuclear weapons, military power is not so much exercised as threatened. It is, Mr. Schelling says, bargaining power, and the exploitation of this power, for good or evil, to preserve peace or to threaten war, is diplomacy - the diplomacy of violence. The author  Read more...
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Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Thomas C Schelling; Harvard University. Center for International Affairs.
ISBN: 0300002211 9780300002218 0300008821 9780300008821
OCLC Number: 567721
Notes: "Written under the auspices of the Center for International Affairs, Harvard University."
"Delivered in part as the Henry L. Stimson lectures, Yale University."
Description: viii, 293 pages 21 cm
Contents: The diplomacy of violence --
The art of commitment --
The manipulation of risk --
The idiom of military action --
The diplomacy of ultimate survival --
The dynamics of mutual alarm --
The dialogue of competitive armament.
Responsibility: by Thomas C. Schelling.

Abstract:

Traditionally, Americans have viewed war as an alternative to diplomacy, and military strategy as the science of victory. Today, however, in our world of nuclear weapons, military power is not so much exercised as threatened. It is, Mr. Schelling says, bargaining power, and the exploitation of this power, for good or evil, to preserve peace or to threaten war, is diplomacy - the diplomacy of violence. The author concentrates in this book on the way in which military capabilites - real or imagined - are used, skillfully or clumsily, as bargaining power. He sees the steps taken by the US during the Berlin and Cuban crises as not merely preparations for engagement, but as signals to an enemy, with reports from the adversary's own military intelligence as our most important diplomatic communications.

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