The art of reading poetry, (Book, 1941) [WorldCat.org]
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The art of reading poetry,

Author: Earl Daniels
Publisher: New York, Farrar & Rinehart, Inc. [©1941]
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
I do not believe that poetry is mysterious or esoteric. It is for all who can read, who can call words, who have rhythm enough, by nature, so that a jazz orchestra sets feet and hands in motion. Likewise, this invitation is to all. But it is, especially, invitation to those regretfully convinced that poetry is not for them, and to those who think they prefer the unequivocating directness of prose. It is invitation  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Poetry
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Daniels, Earl, 1893-1970.
Art of reading poetry.
New York, Farrar & Rinehart, inc. [©1941]
(OCoLC)644000655
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Earl Daniels
OCLC Number: 1003101
Notes: Title on two leaves.
Description: vii, [1], 519, [1] pages 22 cm
Contents: Invitation to reading --
By way of preliminary: outline for a defense --
Lions in the path --
The reading and the readings of the poem --
The stuff of the poem: experience --
The poem as story (1) --
The poem as story (II) the ballad --
The poem as picture --
The poem as idea --
The poem as organization --
The poem as music --
In the nature of an epilogue.
Responsibility: by Earl Daniels ...

Abstract:

I do not believe that poetry is mysterious or esoteric. It is for all who can read, who can call words, who have rhythm enough, by nature, so that a jazz orchestra sets feet and hands in motion. Likewise, this invitation is to all. But it is, especially, invitation to those regretfully convinced that poetry is not for them, and to those who think they prefer the unequivocating directness of prose. It is invitation to labor, and after labor, entrance upon pleasure "not to be chang'd by place or time," the peculiar pleasure which poetry is. - Invitation to reading

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