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At the mind's limits : contemplations by a survivor on Auschwitz and its realities

Author: Jean Améry; Sidney Rosenfeld; Stella P Rosenfeld; Mazal Holocaust Collection.
Publisher: Bloomington : Indiana University Press, ©1980.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
At the Mind's Limits is the story of one man's incredible struggle to understand the reality of horror. In five autobiographical essays, Améry describes his survival -- mental, moral and physical -- through the enormity of the Holocaust. Above all, this masterful record of introspection tells of a young Viennese intellectual's fervent vision of human nature and the betrayal of that vision. Amery depicts the futile  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Personal narratives
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Améry, Jean.
At the mind's limits.
Bloomington : Indiana University Press, ©1980
(OCoLC)568641170
Named Person: Jean Améry
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Jean Améry; Sidney Rosenfeld; Stella P Rosenfeld; Mazal Holocaust Collection.
ISBN: 0253177243 9780253177247 0253211735 9780253211736
OCLC Number: 6250196
Notes: Translation of Jenseits von Schuld und Sühne.
Description: xiv, 111 pages ; 25 cm
Contents: At the mind's limits --
Torture --
How much home does a person need? --
Resentments --
On the necessity and impossibility of being a Jew.
Other Titles: Jenseits von Schuld und Sühne.
Responsibility: Jean Améry ; translated by Sidney Rosenfeld and Stella P. Rosenfeld.
More information:

Abstract:

At the Mind's Limits is the story of one man's incredible struggle to understand the reality of horror. In five autobiographical essays, Améry describes his survival -- mental, moral and physical -- through the enormity of the Holocaust. Above all, this masterful record of introspection tells of a young Viennese intellectual's fervent vision of human nature and the betrayal of that vision. Amery depicts the futile attempts of the intellect to cope with the overwhelming realities of Auschwitz. His torture is perceived as a reduction of self to the purely physical, with an accompanying loss of faith in the world. He struggles to come to terms with exile from his homeland as well as his feelings upon returning to the country of his persecutors. Finally, Amery, once the totally peripheral Jew, explains how complete acceptance of his Jewish identity, as compelled by his experiences in Auschwitz, is the only way in which he can regain human dignity.

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