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Awakening and Insight : Zen Buddhism and Psychotherapy.

Author: Polly Young-Eisendrath; Shoji Muramoto
Publisher: Abingdon, Oxon : Taylor and Francis, 2003. ©2005
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Summary:
Buddhism first came to the West many centuries ago through the Greeks, who also influenced some of the culture and practices of Indian Buddhism. As Buddhism has spread beyond India, it has always been affected by the indigenous traditions of its new homes. When Buddhism appeared in America and Europe in the 1950s and 1960s, it encountered contemporary psychology and psychotherapy, rather than religious traditions.  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Young-Eisendrath, Polly.
Awakening and Insight : Zen Buddhism and Psychotherapy.
Abingdon, Oxon : Taylor and Francis, ©2003
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Polly Young-Eisendrath; Shoji Muramoto
ISBN: 9780203361054 0203361059
OCLC Number: 1048256198
Description: 1 online resource (284 pages)
Contents: BOOK COVER --
HALF-TITLE --
TITLE --
COPYRIGHT --
CONTENTS --
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS --
Note --
CONTRIBUTORS --
INTRODUCTION --
YOUNG-EISENDRATH --
MEETING IN JAPAN: YOUNG-EISENDRATH AND MURAMOTO --
YOUNG-EISENDRATH --
MURAMOTO --
References --
Part I NEW PERSPECTIVES ON BUDDHISM AND PSYCHOLOGY EAST AND WEST --
1 BUDDHISM, RELIGION AND PSYCHOTHERAPY IN THE WORLD TODAY --
Buddhism and psychotherapy --
Japanization of modern Western psychotherapy --
Buddhism --
What is the East? --
Modern view --
Western religions and Buddhism --
Jung's psychology --
Psychotherapy and religion --
References --
2 A BUDDHIST MODEL OF THE HUMAN SELF --
Introduction --
Working through --
Dukkha --
Fundamentally subjective --
Total and immediate --
From No-self to formless self --
The dreamer awakes: a Buddhist model of the human self --
Conclusion --
References and further reading --
3 JUNG, CHRISTIANITY, AND BUDDHISM --
Jung and the Buddhist-Christian dialogue --
Jung's exclusion from the dialogue --
A Jung-Buddhist-Christian dialogue --
A skepsis of ego and Self --
Undiscovered Self, uneradicable ego --
The monarchic psyche --
Questioning the frontiers of the inner life --
Higher consciousness, higher reality --
Beyond the Buddhist-Christian world view --
Notes --
4 THE TRANSFORMATION OF HUMAN SUFFERING --
The spiritual problem of the end of the century --
Dukkha --
How therapy transforms dukkha and awakens compassion --
Aspects of interdependence in Zen and Jung --
Conclusion --
References --
5 ZEN AND PSYCHOTHERAPY --
Freud on neutrality --
Dogen on Zazengi --
Zen and psychoanalysis: contrast and integration --
From a one-person field to a two-person (relational) psychology --
The capacity to be alone --
The emptying place --
Acknowledgements --
Notes --
References --
6 A MINDFUL SELF AND BEYOND --
Introduction --
Self and subjectivity. A Buddhist and a psychoanalytic perspective --
Integration --
Letting go of identification --
Mindfulness --
Beyond the separate self --
Conclusion --
References --
Part II CAUTIONS AND INSIGHTS ABOUT POTENTIAL CONFUSIONS --
7 THE JUNG-HISAMATSU CONVERSATION --
Translator's Introduction --
16 May 1958 --
Notes --
8 JUNG AND BUDDHISM --
Jungian psychology and the historical Jung --
The historical and spiritual background of Jung's encounter with Buddhism --
Goethe's Faust --
Schopenhauer --
The search for a religious-psychological perspective --
Buddhism in transformations and symbols of libido --
Septum Sermones ad Mortuos --
Pleroma or Creatura? --
Gnosis in Psychological Types --
Buddhism in Psychological Types --
Dvandva or opposites: from Indian thought to Chinese thought --
The self as the conjunction of opposites --
Psychological commentaries on Eastern spiritual texts --
A conversation with Shin'ichi Hisamatsu --
The question on liberation from the collective unconscious --
References --
9 WHAT IS I? --
Ego and I --
I am a Kannon --
I in the dream --
The world of Hua-yen --
Interdependent origination --
Level of consciousness --
References --
10 AMERICAN ZEN AND PSYCHOTHERAPY --
Introduction --
Who practices Zen meditation? --
Benefits of Zen meditation in the therapy process --
Stress and anxiety reduction --
Tolerance of mental processes --
Interception of unhealthy habit patterns --
Therapists who meditate --
Pitfalls of Zen meditation practice --
Contraindications for Zen meditation practice --
Teachers' and therapists' ignorance --
Transference between Zen teachers and students --
Unfamiliar meditative experiences --
Ignoring personal wounds --
Integrating Zen meditation and psychotherapy --
The need for integration --
Should therapists teach clients Zen meditation? --
Technique or tradition? --
References. 11 LOCATING BUDDHISM, LOCATING PSYCHOLOGY --
Introduction --
Is Buddhism psychology?: hermeneutic issues --
Appropriating meditative practices --
Problematics of the empty self --
Conclusion --
References --
12 BUDDHISM AND PSYCHOTHERAPY IN THE WEST --
Some definitions --
The metaphor of the path --
The Buddhist path --
The psychotherapeutic path --
The Buddhist path in Nishitani --
The cognitive-behavioral therapeutic path as described by Linehan --
Nishitani and Linehan --
Conclusions --
General conclusion --
Notes --
References --
Part III TRADITIONAL IDEAS IN A NEW LIGHT --
13 KARMA AND INDIVIDUATION --
Introduction --
Karma and individuation --
The boy with no face --
Dreams --
Complex --
Closure and non-closure: opening and failing to shut --
Discussion --
Conclusion --
Acknowledgements --
References --
14 THE CONSCIOUSNESS-ONLY SCHOOL --
The founders of the Consciousness-only School --
Basic tenets of Buddhism --
Emptiness and nirvana with no fixed abode in Mahayana Buddhism --
The three kinds of perceptual patterns --
Primary and secondary vexing passions --
The theories of eight consciousnesses and the four wisdoms --
The theory of the five stages --
The six kinds of practice --
The dual meaning of non-self --
Jung and the Consciousness-only school --
15 THE PROBLEMATIC OF MIND IN GOTAMA BUDDHA --
What is Buddha? --
Emancipation from suffering --
From a psychological point of view --
Note --
16 THE DEVELOPMENT OF BUDDHIST PSYCHOLOGY IN MODERN JAPAN --
Introduction --
Stances of early modern Japanese psychologists --
Enryo Inoue --
Expositions of Buddhist psychology --
Inoue's system of psychotherapy --
Other theoretical elaborations in Buddhist psychology --
Empirical studies of Zen meditation --
Applications of Buddhism to psychotherapy --
Conclusion --
References and further reading --
17 COMING HOME --
Introduction. Training and experience --
An empty nest --
This moment --
A new nest --
Impact on therapeutic practice --
Happiness --
Meditative attention --
Mindful awareness --
Exercise --
Back to Karlijn --
Insight into the interwovenness and variability of all things --
Ethical guidelines --
Conclusion --
AUTHOR INDEX --
SUBJECT INDEX.

Abstract:

Taking Zen Buddhism as its starting point, this volume is a collection of critiques, commentaries and histories about a particular meeting of Buddhism and psychology.  Read more...

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