Beautiful swift fox : Erna Fergusson and the modern southwest (Book, 1996) [WorldCat.org]
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Beautiful swift fox : Erna Fergusson and the modern southwest
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Beautiful swift fox : Erna Fergusson and the modern southwest

Author: Robert Gish
Publisher: College Station : Texas A & M University Press, ©1996.
Series: Tarleton State University southwestern studies in the humanities, no. 7.
Edition/Format:   Print book : Biography : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Summary:
The American Southwest has assumed the status of a cultural icon over the last few decades, and one of the writers who helped it to do so was Erna Fergusson, named by the Hopis Beautiful Swift Fox. An Anglo American whose travel writing featured the multi-ethnicity of her region, she popularized the culture and landscapes of her native New Mexico and its surrounding states in a range of writing that prefigured the  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Biographies
Criticism, interpretation, etc
History
Biography
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Gish, Robert.
Beautiful swift fox.
College Station : Texas A & M University Press, ©1996
(OCoLC)605363018
Online version:
Gish, Robert.
Beautiful swift fox.
College Station : Texas A & M University Press, ©1996
(OCoLC)607751338
Named Person: Erna Fergusson; Erna Fergusson; Erna Fergusson
Material Type: Biography
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Robert Gish
ISBN: 0890967199 9780890967195
OCLC Number: 34705097
Description: xiv, 205 pages ; 24 cm.
Contents: Inspiration : Tierra Encantada --
Travel : beautiful swift fox --
History : Clio at the wheel --
Advocacy : pageantry and prejudice --
Friends : first lady of letters.
Series Title: Tarleton State University southwestern studies in the humanities, no. 7.
Responsibility: by Robert Franklin Gish.

Abstract:

The American Southwest has assumed the status of a cultural icon over the last few decades, and one of the writers who helped it to do so was Erna Fergusson, named by the Hopis Beautiful Swift Fox. An Anglo American whose travel writing featured the multi-ethnicity of her region, she popularized the culture and landscapes of her native New Mexico and its surrounding states in a range of writing that prefigured the genre-defying art that has come to be called the New Journalism.Much has been written about New Mexico's remarkable Fergusson family, especially brother Harvey and his novels. But Erna Fergusson's literary career has been largely overlooked. An iconoclast at the forefront of the Southwest Renaissance movement, Erna gained a wide reputation beginning in the 1930s for her "written versions of the Southwest," which embraced the complexities of regional culture and sympathetically and intelligently portrayed the Indian and Mexican influences.Distinguished Southwestern writer Robert Franklin Gish assesses Fergussons's literary contributions and unlocks the inner workings of the prose stylist who operated at the interstices of genres. With his postmodern reappraisal of the creative nonfiction forms she used, Gish prompts readers to reconsider how they view the art of nonfiction writing. Gish argues persuasively that Fergusson's identity as a native New Mexican and the region's singular landscape informed the attitudes and values present in her art. He explores the ways her entrepreneurial stint as a New Mexico tour guide during the 1920s and 1930s shaped the organizational strategies for her writing. He considers thoughtfully her various forms of writing and how she used travelogue, journalistic report, popular history, and persuasive essay to elevate the Southwest to prominence. Gish shows her writing as highly evocative, descriptive, and metaphorical, defying the conventions of the nonfiction forms she used and paving the way for America's school of New Journalism.Beautiful Swift Fox is not strictly biography; nor does it, in a traditional sense, seek to explicate a body of work. Rather, like its subject, it bridges genres, offering a meditation on one Southwestern writer's sense of place.

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