Beautiful wasteland : the rise of Detroit as America's postindustrial frontier (eBook, 2016) [WorldCat.org]
skip to content
Beautiful wasteland : the rise of Detroit as America's postindustrial frontier Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Beautiful wasteland : the rise of Detroit as America's postindustrial frontier

Author: Rebecca J Kinney
Publisher: Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, 2016.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : State or province government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"The first book to analyze how contemporary ideas of Detroit circulate in popular culture in order to map the extension of the mythology of the frontier in American culture. Kinney analyzes a cross-section of twentieth and twenty first century cultural locations--an internet web forum, architectural photography, advertising and commercial culture, documentary film, and print and online media--to reveal the continued  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
(DLC) 2016003047
(OCoLC)940957614
Material Type: Document, Government publication, State or province government publication, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Rebecca J Kinney
ISBN: 9781452953380 1452953384
OCLC Number: 959274987
Description: 1 online resource
Contents: Introduction: Building a beautiful wasteland --
It's turned into a race thing : white innocence and the old neighborhood --
Picturing ruin and possibility : the rise of the postindustrial frontier --
Fanning the embers : branding Detroit as a phoenix rising --
Flickers of the American dream : filming possibility in decline --
Feeding Detroit's rise : provisions for urban pioneers --
Conclusion: The strait : a tale of two cities.
Responsibility: Rebecca J. Kinney.

Abstract:

"The first book to analyze how contemporary ideas of Detroit circulate in popular culture in order to map the extension of the mythology of the frontier in American culture. Kinney analyzes a cross-section of twentieth and twenty first century cultural locations--an internet web forum, architectural photography, advertising and commercial culture, documentary film, and print and online media--to reveal the continued process of racialization in stories we tell about the rise, fall, and potential for rise again in Detroit. Kinney argues that the contemporary stories produced and told about Detroit enable the erasure of white privilege and systemic racism in the past and the present. By situating Detroit as a 'beautiful wasteland, ' both desirable and distressed, the author shows how the narrative of ruin and possibility form a mutually constituted relationship: the city is possible precisely because of its perceived ruin. As an interdisciplinary text that weaves together popular narratives and visual stories to the scholarly conversations on racial formation, urban development, and urban history, Kinney illuminates the interplay between history and culture in the twenty first century American city. Beautiful Wasteland will appeal to a wide cross-section of audiences including: scholars of Ethnic Studies, American Studies, Popular Culture, Urban Studies. Additionally its compelling and easily accessible case studies make it an accessible book for lay audiences and use in introductory courses"--Author's website.

Reviews

Editorial reviews

Publisher Synopsis

"Rebecca J. Kinney's sophisticated and compelling study demonstrates the centrality of race-making to contemporary narratives of urban decline and revitalization."-David M. P. Freund, University of Read more...

 
User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.