Being One, Being Many (Article, 2016) [WorldCat.org]
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Being One, Being Many

Author: Christian Kroos Affiliation: Centre for Vision, Speech and Signal Processing, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH, UK; Damith Herath Affiliation: Faculty of Education, Science, Technology and Mathematics, University of Canberra, Canberra, Australia
Edition/Format: Chapter Chapter : English
Summary:
If the current development of robotics indicates its future, we will be soon able to create robots that are exactly identical, intentional agents—at least as far as their software is concerned. This raises questions about identity as sameness and identity in the sense of individuality/subjectivity. How will we treat a robotic agent that is precisely the same as multiple others once it left its inanimate appearance  Read more...
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All Authors / Contributors: Christian Kroos Affiliation: Centre for Vision, Speech and Signal Processing, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH, UK; Damith Herath Affiliation: Faculty of Education, Science, Technology and Mathematics, University of Canberra, Canberra, Australia
ISBN: 978-981-10-0319-6 978-981-10-0321-9
Publication:Herath, Damith, damithc@gmail.com, Faculty of Edu.,Sci, Tech and Maths, University of Canberra, Canberra, Aust Capital Terr, Australia; Robots and Art : Exploring an Unlikely Symbiosis; 191-209; Singapore : Springer Singapore : Springer
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 6032703718
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Abstract:

If the current development of robotics indicates its future, we will be soon able to create robots that are exactly identical, intentional agents—at least as far as their software is concerned. This raises questions about identity as sameness and identity in the sense of individuality/subjectivity. How will we treat a robotic agent that is precisely the same as multiple others once it left its inanimate appearance behind and by its intentionality claims to be individual and subjective? In this chapter we show how these issues emerged in the implementation of the artwork ‘The Swarming Heads’ by Stelarc.

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