Between damnation and starvation : priests and merchants in Newfoundland politics, 1745-1855 (eBook, 1999) [WorldCat.org]
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Between damnation and starvation : priests and merchants in Newfoundland politics, 1745-1855

Author: John Carrick Greene
Publisher: Montreal : McGill-Queen's University Press, 1999.
Series: McGill-Queen's studies in the history of religion., Series two.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
In 1997 the Canadian constitution was amended to remove the denominational rights of Newfoundland churches regarding education, erasing the last vestiges of a uniquely organized society. Until the 1950s and 1960s Newfoundland had been characterized by an electoral map drawn to denominational specifications, cabinet and civil service positions allocated on a per capita sectarian basis, and government expenditures  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Electronic books
History
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Greene, John Carrick, 1939-
Between damnation and starvation.
Montreal : McGill-Queen's University Press, 1999
(DLC) 00690882
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: John Carrick Greene
OCLC Number: 1091567566
Description: 1 online resource
Contents: Intro --
Contents --
Acknowledgments --
Abbreviations --
Maps --
Introduction --
1 Religious Competition, 1745-1825 --
2 The Anglican Response, 1820-34 --
3 Bishop Fleming and Newfoundland Catholicism, 1829-37 --
4 Religion and Politics, 1832-36 --
5 The Catholic Crusade, 1836-38 --
6 Checkmating Reform, 1837-41 --
7 Constitutional Change, 1837-47 --
8 The Rise of Philip Little, 1848-52 --
9 Religion and Electoral Representation, 1852-54 --
10 The Election of 1855 --
Conclusion --
Appendix --
1 Exhibiting the extent of the "exclusive system" in Newfoundland --
2 Distribution of members, by districts, according to the Representation Bill produced by Philip Little in the House of Assembly, St. John's, February 20, 1852 --
3 The electoral division of Conception Bay according to W.B. Row, Legislative Council, March 19, 1852 --
4 Probable returns under the bill passed by the House of Assembly and sent to the Council for their concurrence on the 28th March, 1853 according to the census of 1845 --
5 Legislative Council amendments to the Representation Bill passed by the House of Assembly, March 28, 1853 --
6 Representation bill passed by the Assembly, April 11, 1854 --
7 Legislative Council amendments to the Representation Bill passed by the Assembly, April 1854 --
8 The Representation Bill passed by the Assembly and finally accepted by the Legislative Council, Nov. 9, 1854 --
A Note on Sources --
Notes --
Index --
A --
B --
C --
D --
E --
F --
G --
H --
I --
J --
K --
L --
M --
N --
O --
P --
Q --
R --
S --
T --
U --
V --
W.
Series Title: McGill-Queen's studies in the history of religion., Series two.
Responsibility: John P. Greene.

Abstract:

In 1997 the Canadian constitution was amended to remove the denominational rights of Newfoundland churches regarding education, erasing the last vestiges of a uniquely organized society. Until the 1950s and 1960s Newfoundland had been characterized by an electoral map drawn to denominational specifications, cabinet and civil service positions allocated on a per capita sectarian basis, and government expenditures divided according to denominational proportions of the total population.

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