The books of Nahum, Habakkuk, and Zephaniah (Book, 2021) [WorldCat.org]
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The books of Nahum, Habakkuk, and Zephaniah
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The books of Nahum, Habakkuk, and Zephaniah

Author: Thomas Renz
Publisher: Grand Rapids, Michigan : William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 2021. ©2021
Series: New international commentary on the Old Testament.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
In this commentary, Thomas Renz reads Nahum, Habakkuk, and Zephaniah as three carefully crafted writings of enduring relevance, each of which makes a vital contribution to the biblical canon. Discussing the historical settings, Renz takes up both long-standing issues, such as the relationship of Zephaniah to Josiah's reforms, and the socioeconomic conditions of the time suggested by recent archaeological research.  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Commentaries
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Thomas Renz
ISBN: 9780802826268 0802826261
OCLC Number: 1199587367
Description: xxxix, 703 pages ; 25 cm.
Contents: Intro --
Title page --
Copyright --
Dedication --
Contents --
List of excursuses --
General editor's preface --
Author's preface --
Abbreviations --
Select bibliography --
Introduction to Nahum, Habakkuk, and Zephaniah --
I. The nature of Prophetic books --
II. The minor Prophets in the Canon --
III. The unity of the book of the twelve --
IV. Nahum, Habakkuk, and Zephaniah in the book of the twelve --
V. Nahum, Habakkuk, and Zephaniah and their constituent units --
VI. An outline of the late Neo-assyrian and early Neo-Babylonian period --
The book of Nahum --
Introduction --
I. The Profile of the book --
A. The superscription --
B. Macrostructure --
C. Language and style --
D. Textual witnesses --
II. The development of the book --
A. General comments on the origin of the book --
B. The individual units within the book --
C. The redaction of the book of the twelve --
III. The rhetorical function of the book --
A. The message of Nahum's poetry at the time of its origin --
B. Nahum's place in the book of the twelve --
C. Nahum's place in the Biblical Canon --
D. Nahum in the history of interpretation --
E. Nahum's place in the church today --
Text and commentary --
I. The superscription to the book (1:1) --
II. Contemplating YHWH, the avenging God (1:2-10) --
III. Accusation against the city (1:11) --
IV. YHWH's verdict (1:12-14) --
V. Announcement of deliverance (1:15 [2:1]) --
VI. Images of the fall of Nineveh (2:1-10[2-11]) --
VII. Ridicule of the king of Nineveh (2:11-12[12-13]) --
VIII. Prophecy of complete destruction (2:13[14]) --
IX. Doom and humiliation for the blood flow City (3:1-7) --
X. Denunciation of the city's complacency (3:8-12) --
XI. Exposition of the uselessness of the city's defenses (3:13-17) --
XII. Exposition of the helplessness of the city's ruler (3:18-19) --
The book of Habakkuk --
Introduction --
I. The profile of the book --
A. The superscriptions --
B. Macrostructure --
C. Language and style --
D. Redaction history --
E. Textual witnesses --
II. The historical setting of the book --
III. The rhetorical function of the book --
A. Habakkuk's message in its original context --
B. Habakkuk's place in the book of the twelve --
C. Habakkuk's place in the Biblical Canon --
D. Habakkuk in the history of interpretation --
E. Habakkuk's place in the church today --
Text and commentary --
5058 I. The superscription (1:1) --
II. The first part of Habakkuk's complaint (1:2-4) --
III. The citation of an earlier oracle (1:5-11) --
IV. The final part of the complaint (1:12-17) --
V. The prophet's resolve to get an answer (2:1) --
VI. The instruction to the prophet (2:2-3) --
VII. The revelation (2:4-5) --
VIII. The agreement of the oppressed nations, first saying (2:6-8) --
IX. The second saying (2:9-11) --
X. The third saying (2:12-14) --
XI. The fourth saying (2:15-17) --
XII. The fifth saying (2:18-20) --
XIII. The heading for Habakkuk's prayer (3:1) --
XIV. The opening part of the prayer (3:2) --
XV. A reflection on YHWH's appearance (3:3-7) --
XVI. Expression of marvel at YHWH's attack on his enemies (3:8-15) --
XVII. Expression of confidence in the midst of distress (3:16-19a) --
The postscript (3:19b) --
The book of Zephaniah --
Introduction --
I. The profile of the book --
A. The superscription --
B. Macrostructure --
II. The historical setting of the book --
III. The rhetorical function of the book --
A. Zephaniah's message in its original context --
B. Zephaniah's place in the Biblical Canon --
C. Zephaniah in the history of interpretation --
D. Zephaniah's place in the church today --
Text and commentary --
I. Superscription (i:i) --
II. Declaration of sweeping judgment (1:2-6) --
III. Announcement of the day of YHWH (1:7-18) --
IV. Call to submit to God's judgment (2:1-4) --
V. Announcements of the fate of nations (2:5-15) --
VI. Jerusalem will share the fate of nations (3:1-5) --
VIL Reaffirmation of comprehensive judgment (3:6-8) --
VIII. Announcement of a future beyond judgment (3:9-13) --
IX. Celebration of life beyond judgment (3:14-17) --
X. Promise of salvation (3:18-20) --
Index of authors --
Index of subjects --
Index of scripture and other ancient sources --
Index of Hebrew words.
Series Title: New international commentary on the Old Testament.
Responsibility: Thomas Renz.

Abstract:

In this commentary, Thomas Renz reads Nahum, Habakkuk, and Zephaniah as three carefully crafted writings of enduring relevance, each of which makes a vital contribution to the biblical canon. Discussing the historical settings, Renz takes up both long-standing issues, such as the relationship of Zephaniah to Josiah's reforms, and the socioeconomic conditions of the time suggested by recent archaeological research. The place of these writings within the Book of the Twelve is given fresh consideration, including the question of what one should make of the alleged redaction history of Nahum and Habakkuk. The author's careful translation of the text comes with detailed textual notes, illuminating some of the Bible's most outstanding poetry (Nahum) and one of the biblical chapters that is among the most difficult to translate (Habakkuk 3). The thorough verse-by-verse commentary is followed by stimulating theological reflection, opening up avenues for teaching and preaching from these prophetic writings. No matter their previous familiarity with these and other Minor Prophets, scholars, pastors, and lay readers alike will find needed guidance in working through these difficult but important books of the Bible.

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