Boston modern : figurative expressionism as alternative modernism (Book, 2005) [WorldCat.org]
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Boston modern : figurative expressionism as alternative modernism

Author: Judith Arlene Bookbinder
Publisher: Durham, N.H. : University of New Hampshire Press ; Hanover : University Press of New England, ©2005.
Series: Revisiting New England.
Edition/Format:   Print book : State or province government publication : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Summary:
"In Boston Modern, Judith Bookbinder firmly establishes Boston figurative expressionism as an integral part of American modernism, one that presents an alternative approach to the trajectory of abstraction in the turbulent decades bracketing the Second World War. The works of the movement's most remarkable artists boldly confront issues of personal and group identity in the modern world; consider the role of the
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Details

Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Judith Arlene Bookbinder
ISBN: 1584654880 9781584654889
OCLC Number: 57652272
Description: x, 372 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 24 cm.
Contents: "The new heroism" : Karl Zerbe's beginnings, the German avant-garde, and 'Entartete Kunst' in Boston --
Immigrant childhoods : the education of Hyman Bloom and Jack Levine --
Society as a morality play : Jack Levine's view of the world --
Mystery and materiality : Hyman Bloom's spiritual renderings --
Teaching by example : Karl Zerbe's painting and pedagogy --
Challenging established assumptions : David Aronson, other museum school students, and the debate at the Institute of Contemporary Art --
Reestablishing roots : Aronson, Guston, and a renewed figurative expressionist debate --
Conclusion : figurative expressionism beyond Boston.
Series Title: Revisiting New England.
Responsibility: Judith Bookbinder.
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Abstract:

"In Boston Modern, Judith Bookbinder firmly establishes Boston figurative expressionism as an integral part of American modernism, one that presents an alternative approach to the trajectory of abstraction in the turbulent decades bracketing the Second World War. The works of the movement's most remarkable artists boldly confront issues of personal and group identity in the modern world; consider the role of the artist as witness to violence, prejudice, and corruption in modern society; and intricately reinterpret the nature of the creative process and its formal and spatial implications.

Within Boston's unique and surprisingly receptive Anglo-Saxon and academic tradition, Karl Zerbe, Hyman Bloom, Jack Levine, David Aronson, Philip Guston, and others, many of whom were Jewish immigrants from eastern Europe or their children, struggled to clarify their identities as outsiders in an insider's world and as modern artists. Although at first critically and popularly well received throughout the country, Boston figurative expressionists were increasingly marginalized by the development of abstract modernism centered in New York."

"However, giving voice to the ethos of a community in flux, the movement continues to inspire artists today. The vibrant dialogue the group established between their individual perspectives and the aesthetic conventions taught at Boston's academic institutions is here at last given the prominent treatment it deserves. Boston Modern definitively challenges widely accepted notions of modernist discourse in American art history."--Jacket.

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