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Breaking into the game industry : advice for a successful career from those who have done it

Author: Brenda Brathwaite; Ian Schreiber
Publisher: Boston, MA. : Course Technology, Cengage Learning, 2012.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Written in a question-and-answer format, this book presents readers with a clear overview of what the game industry is and how the professionals operate in it, answering the key questions new developers should be asking as they begin their career.
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Brathwaite, Brenda.
Breaking into the game industry.
Boston, Mass. : Course Technology, Cengage Learning, 2012
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Brenda Brathwaite; Ian Schreiber
ISBN: 9781435458055 1435458052
OCLC Number: 742783674
Description: 1 online resource (xii, 291 pages) : portraits
Contents: Question 1. Why are you doing this? What's this book about, and why are you writing it? --
question 2. How should I choose a school? --
question 3. What percentage of my school work will help me get a job? --
question 4. Lots of stuff I learn in school seems like it has nothing to do with actually making games for a living. What classes did you take that were the most useful on the job? --
question 5. How much weight do studios put on GPAs? --
question 6. How much weight do studios put on the major or college attended? --
question 7. Why should I care about video game history? --
question 8. Is a graduate degree (such as an MFA or Ph. D.) useful for getting a job in the game industry? --
question 9. I want to be a programmer in the game industry. People are suggesting I shouldn't bother with more complex languages like C or C++ and focus instead on languages like ActionScript (Flash). Is that a valid path? --
question 10. Is getting an undergraduate degree a waste of time if I want a job in the game industry? --
question 11. Is it important to play games as a student? --
question 12. If you could add something to a student with great vision, what would it be? --
question 13. I want to be a game designer. Do I need to learn programming or computer science? --
question 14. Is it better to be a specialist or generalist, in the short term or long term? --
question 15. Is there another way to get up to speed on game development, other than making games? --
question 16. What's the best subject to make a game about? --
question 17. Where do you get your ideas? --
question 18. How do I get my games to be more fun and not just tasks? --
question 19. How do I make contacts in the game industry? --
question 20. It costs how much to go to GDC? How will I ever afford that? --
question 21. Should I get my own business cards? What should be on them? What do I do with them? --
question 22. When should I start networking? --
question 23. How do I get game developers' business cards? --
question 24. When should I follow up after getting someone's business card? --
question 25. Is there anything I shouldn't do when following up? --
question 26. Should I ask developers to review my portfolio? --
question 27. I heard that a lot of people in the game industry use social media (Twitter, Facebook, and so on). Why? --
question 28. What else shouldn't I do when communicating with developers? --
question 29. If I change my last name (such as for marriage) in mid-career, does that affect my career by messing with the credits of previously shipped games? --
question 30. What should the front page of my portfolio look like? --
question 31. As an artist, what are some general portfolio guidelines I need to follow? --
question 32. What do character artists need to show in their portfolios? --
question 33. What do environment artists need to show in their portfolios? --
question 34. What do modelers need to show in their portfolios? --
question 35. What do texture artists need to show in their portfolios? --
question 36. What do concept artists need to show in their portfolios? --
question 37. What do game designers need to show in their portfolios? --
question 38. What do game writers need to show in their portfolios? --
question 39. What do level designers need to show in their portfolios? --
question 40. What do programmers need to show in their portfolios? --
question 41. What should a producer/project manager (or someone aspiring to be one) have in their portfolio? --
question 42. What do sound designers need to show in their portfolios? --
question 43. Are there people who don't need portfolios? --
question 44. How many images/games should I have in my portfolio? --
question 45. When should I start working on my portfolio? --
question 46. Have you seen any stupid portfolio tricks? --
question 47. How do I get my work out there so someone can see it? --
question 48. Wait, doesn't everyone say that it's impossible to be hired as a game designer or game writer straight out of college, or as your first job in the industry? --
question 49. How much help will reading about game development be in obtaining a job in the game industry? --
question 50. How much experience should I have before I start looking for a job as a game designer? --
question 51. I talked to a woman and she was really excited because she heard I was a [insert desired position here]. She wanted to talk with me and see my portfolio. That's great, right? --
question 52. What's the best approach for getting an internship? --
question 53. Where should I look for jobs? --
question 54. Should I just show up Unannounced at a game company? --
question 55. Does the current state of the economy have an effect on game development or hiring? --
question 56. How do I write a good cover letter that connects with HR and developers? --
question 57. How do I write a good resume that connects with HR and developers? --
question 58. They're giving me an art/design/programming test. What is it and why are they doing this? --
question 59. The design/programming/art test asks me to come up with some game/code/art ideas. I don't want them to steal my ideas! What should I do? --
question 60. Should I try to take a coding test before I am solid in the language? --
question 61. How early should I show up for an interview? --
question 62. How should I dress for an interview? --
question 63. What happens in an interview? How do I handle it? --
question 64. They just offered me a salary! How do I know if it's good? Should I negotiate? --
question 65. Do interviewees ever say dumb things? --
question 66. Do people still expect me to follow up after an interview? --
question 67. What should I do before I accept a job offer? --
question 68. They want me to sign a non-compete. What's that? --
question 69. They want me to sign an NDA. What's that? --
question 70. How do I find a place to live if I'm hired in a new city? --
question 71. Is there such a thing as taking a new job too early? --
question 72. How will I feel my first day on the job? --
question 73. Once I have a job, any key pointers? --
question 74. What do entry-level employees typically do in their first few months? --
question 75. If I enter in the middle of a project, what's the best way to get up to speed? --
question 76. If I join a game company, will they make my game idea? --
question 77. How is performance measured for raises, bonuses, and promotions? --
question 78. What is it like to work on a big licensed title? --
question 79. What is it like to work at a small studio on a series of small projects? --
question 80. What is the scariest thing about being a game designer? --
question 81. What's the worst thing you've seen in a game development meeting? --
question 82. Will I really work 70 hours a week? --
question 83. What should I do if I hate my job? (or: how to exit a company gracefully) --
question 84. What should I do if I hate someone I work with? --
question 85. What should I do if I disagree with someone? --
question 86. What is the "game industry"? --
question 87. Is there a way to get a feel for the industry before even getting there? --
question 88. Is the game industry a good place to meet someone to date? --
question 89. What does a game developer do? --
question 90. What does a lead do? --
question 91. Who is the most evil person on a game development team? --
question 92. Have you seen someone make it in the industry with a physical or mental disability? --
question 93. How much money will I make working in the game industry? --
question 94. Do small studios typically have health, dental, and savings plans? --
question 95. Which programming language is used the most? --
question 96. What is it like to be a woman in the game industry? --
question 97. What is it like to be a minority in the game industry? Is diversity important? --
question 98. What is it like working as an LGBT in the game industry? --
question 99. I want to send my idea to a game company. How do I do this? --
question 100. Is there such a thing as a stupid question?
Responsibility: Brenda Brathwaite, Ian Schreiber.

Abstract:

Written in a question-and-answer format, this book presents readers with a clear overview of what the game industry is and how the professionals operate in it, answering the key questions new developers should be asking as they begin their career.

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Is getting an undergraduate degree a waste of time if I want a job in the game industry? -- question 11. Is it important to play games as a student? -- question 12. If you could add something to a student with great vision, what would it be? -- question 13. I want to be a game designer. Do I need to learn programming or computer science? -- question 14. Is it better to be a specialist or generalist, in the short term or long term? -- question 15. Is there another way to get up to speed on game development, other than making games? -- question 16. What's the best subject to make a game about? -- question 17. Where do you get your ideas? -- question 18. How do I get my games to be more fun and not just tasks? -- question 19. How do I make contacts in the game industry? -- question 20. It costs how much to go to GDC? How will I ever afford that? -- question 21. Should I get my own business cards? What should be on them? What do I do with them? -- question 22. When should I start networking? -- question 23. How do I get game developers' business cards? -- question 24. When should I follow up after getting someone's business card? -- question 25. Is there anything I shouldn't do when following up? -- question 26. Should I ask developers to review my portfolio? -- question 27. I heard that a lot of people in the game industry use social media (Twitter, Facebook, and so on). Why? -- question 28. What else shouldn't I do when communicating with developers? -- question 29. If I change my last name (such as for marriage) in mid-career, does that affect my career by messing with the credits of previously shipped games? -- question 30. What should the front page of my portfolio look like? -- question 31. As an artist, what are some general portfolio guidelines I need to follow? -- question 32. What do character artists need to show in their portfolios? -- question 33. What do environment artists need to show in their portfolios? -- question 34. 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How do I write a good cover letter that connects with HR and developers? -- question 57. How do I write a good resume that connects with HR and developers? -- question 58. They're giving me an art/design/programming test. What is it and why are they doing this? -- question 59. The design/programming/art test asks me to come up with some game/code/art ideas. I don't want them to steal my ideas! What should I do? -- question 60. Should I try to take a coding test before I am solid in the language? -- question 61. How early should I show up for an interview? -- question 62. How should I dress for an interview? -- question 63. What happens in an interview? How do I handle it? -- question 64. They just offered me a salary! How do I know if it's good? Should I negotiate? -- question 65. Do interviewees ever say dumb things? -- question 66. Do people still expect me to follow up after an interview? -- question 67. What should I do before I accept a job offer? -- question 68. They want me to sign a non-compete. What's that? -- question 69. They want me to sign an NDA. What's that? -- question 70. How do I find a place to live if I'm hired in a new city? -- question 71. Is there such a thing as taking a new job too early? -- question 72. How will I feel my first day on the job? -- question 73. Once I have a job, any key pointers? -- question 74. What do entry-level employees typically do in their first few months? -- question 75. If I enter in the middle of a project, what's the best way to get up to speed? -- question 76. If I join a game company, will they make my game idea? -- question 77. How is performance measured for raises, bonuses, and promotions? -- question 78. What is it like to work on a big licensed title? -- question 79. What is it like to work at a small studio on a series of small projects? -- question 80. What is the scariest thing about being a game designer? -- question 81. 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