Broadcast hysteria : Orson Welles's War of the worlds and the art of fake news (eBook, 2015) [WorldCat.org]
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Broadcast hysteria : Orson Welles's War of the worlds and the art of fake news

Author: A Brad Schwartz
Publisher: New York : Hill and Wang, 2015.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : English : First editionView all editions and formats
Summary:
On the evening of October 30, 1938, radio listeners across the United States heard a startling report of a meteor strike in the New Jersey countryside. With sirens blaring in the background, announcers in the field described mysterious creatures, terrifying war machines, and thick clouds of poison gas moving toward New York City. As the invading force approached Manhattan, some listeners sat transfixed, while others  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Electronic books
Criticism, interpretation, etc
History
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Schwartz, A. Brad.
Broadcast hysteria.
(DLC) 2014040510
(OCoLC)895030504
Named Person: Orson Welles; Orson Welles
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: A Brad Schwartz
ISBN: 9780809031634 0809031639
OCLC Number: 906829397
Description: 1 online resource.
Contents: Introduction --
Journalism and showmanship --
Winged Mercury --
Martians of the mind's eye --
Yours in terror --
Public frightener no. 1 --
Air racketeers --
The public interest --
The story of the century --
A matter of psychology --
The horror man --
Conclusion.
Responsibility: A. Brad Schwartz.

Abstract:

On the evening of October 30, 1938, radio listeners across the United States heard a startling report of a meteor strike in the New Jersey countryside. With sirens blaring in the background, announcers in the field described mysterious creatures, terrifying war machines, and thick clouds of poison gas moving toward New York City. As the invading force approached Manhattan, some listeners sat transfixed, while others ran to alert neighbors or to call the police. Some even fled their homes. But the hair-raising broadcast was not a real news bulletin-it was Orson Welles's adaptation of the H. G. Wells classic The War of the Worlds. In Broadcast Hysteria, A. Brad Schwartz boldly retells the story of Welles's famed radio play and its impact. Did it really spawn a "wave of mass hysteria," as The New York Times reported' Schwartz is the first to examine the hundreds of letters sent to Orson Welles himself in the days after the broadcast, and his findings challenge the conventional wisdom. Few listeners believed an actual attack was under way. But even so, Schwartz shows that Welles's broadcast became a major scandal, prompting a different kind of mass panic as Americans debated the bewitching power of the radio and the country's vulnerability in a time of crisis. When the debate was over, American broadcasting had changed for good, but not for the better. As Schwartz tells this story, we observe how an atmosphere of natural disaster and impending war permitted broadcasters to create shared live national experiences for the first time. We follow Orson Welles's rise to fame and watch his manic energy and artistic genius at work in the play's hurried yet innovative production. And we trace the present-day popularity of "fake news" back to its source in Welles's show and its many imitators. Schwartz's original research, gifted storytelling, and thoughtful analysis make Broadcast Hysteria a groundbreaking new look at a crucial but little-understood episode in American history.

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