BSD hacks : 100 industrial-strength tips & tools (eBook, 2004) [WorldCat.org]
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BSD hacks : 100 industrial-strength tips & tools
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BSD hacks : 100 industrial-strength tips & tools

Author: Dru Lavigne
Publisher: Beijing ; Sebastopol, California : O'Reilly, 2004.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : English : First edition
Summary:
In the world of Unix operating systems, the various BSDs come with a long heritage of high-quality software and well-designed solutions, making them a favorite OS of a wide range of users. Among budget-minded users who adopted BSD early on to developers of some of today's largest Internet sites, the popularity of BSD systems continues to grow. If you use the BSD operating system, then you know that the secret of its  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Lavigne, Dru.
BSD hacks.
Beijing ; Sebastopol, California : O'Reilly, 2004
xvii, 427 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Dru Lavigne
ISBN: 9780596153526 059615352X
OCLC Number: 861530126
Notes: "100 industrial-strength tips & tools"--Cover.
Includes index.
Description: 1 online resource (449 pages) : illustrations
Contents: BSD Hacks; Contributors; Acknowledgments; Preface; How to Use this Book; How This Book Is Organized; Conventions Used in This Book; Using Code Examples; We&d Like to Hear from You; 1. Customizing the User Environment; 1. Get the Most Out of the Default Shell; Editing and Navigating the Command Line; Learning from Your Command History; Silencing Auto-Complete; See Also; 2. Useful tcsh Shell Configuration File Options; Setting Shell Variables; 3. Create Shell Bindings; Specifying Strings; See Also; 4. Use Terminal and X Bindings; Shell Bindings Versus Terminal Bindings; More Mapping Caveats Making Mappings Work with XSee Also; 5. Use the Mouse at a Terminal; If X Is Not Installed; See Also; 6. Get Your Daily Dose of Trivia; Pursuing Trivia; Sundry Amusements; The phase of the moon; Adding Some Color to Your Terminal; See Also; 7. Lock the Screen; Using autologout; Enforcing Logout; See Also; 8. Create a Trash Directory; The Code; Replacing rm with ~/bin/trash; Running the Code Safely; Taking Out the Trash; Hacking the Hack; 9. Customize User Configurations; dot.login; dot.login_conf; dot.mail_aliases and dot.mailrc; dot.profile; dot.rhosts; dot.shrc Missing (but Useful) Dot Filesdot.xinitrc; Editing /usr/src/share/skel/Makefile; The Other BSDs; OpenBSD; See Also; 10. Maintain Your Environment on Multiple Systems; Using unison; Automating the Process; Creating Portable Files; See Also; 11. Use an Interactive Shell; Cleaning Up script Files; Recording an Interactive Shell Session; Letting Other People Watch Your Live Shell Sessions; See Also; 12. Use Multiple Screens on One Terminal; Getting Started; Multitasking with screen; Switching between windows; Splitting windows; Better window switching; Naming windows; Attaching and Deattaching Additional FeaturesSee Also; 2. Dealing with Files and Filesystems; 13. Find Things; Finding Commands; Finding Words; See Also; 14. Get the Most Out of grep; Searching by Relevance; Document Extracts; Using Regular Expressions; Combining grep with Other Commands; See Also; 15. Manipulate Files with sed; Searching with sed; Replacing Existing Text; Multiple Transformations; See Also; 16. Format Text at the Command Line; Removing Comments; Using the Holding Space to Mark Text; Translating Case; Translating Characters; Removing Duplicate Line Feeds; Deleting Characters Translating Tabs to SpacesSee Also; 17. Delimiter Dilemma; The Code; Hacking the Hack; See Also; 18. DOS Floppy Manipulation; Common Error Messages; Managing the Floppy; Allowing Regular Users to Mount Floppies; Formatting Floppies; Automating the Format Process; See Also; 19. Access Windows Shares Without a Server; Accessing Microsoft Shares; See Also; 20. Deal with Disk Hogs; daily_clean_tmps; daily_clean_preserve; Limiting Files; The Other BSDs; OpenBSD; See Also; 21. Manage Temporary Files and Swap Space; Moving /tmp to RAM; Creating a Swap File on Disk; Monitoring Swap Changes
Responsibility: Dru Lavigne.
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Abstract:

In the world of Unix operating systems, the various BSDs come with a long heritage of high-quality software and well-designed solutions, making them a favorite OS of a wide range of users. Among budget-minded users who adopted BSD early on to developers of some of today's largest Internet sites, the popularity of BSD systems continues to grow. If you use the BSD operating system, then you know that the secret of its success is not just in its price tag: practical, reliable, extraordinarily stable and flexible, BSD also offers plenty of fertile ground for creative, time-saving tweaks a.

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