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Charles S. Peirce's phenomenology : analysis and consciousness

Author: Richard Kenneth Atkins
Publisher: New York, NY : Oxford University Press, [2018]
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
No reasonable person would deny that the sound of a falling pin is less intense than the feeling of a hot poker pressed against the skin, or that the recollection of something seen decades earlier is less vivid than beholding it in the present. Yet John Locke is quick to dismiss a blind man's report that the color scarlet is like the sound of a trumpet, and Thomas Nagel similarly avers that such loose intermodal  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Atkins, Richard Kenneth.
Charles S. Peirce's phenomenology.
New York : Oxford University Press, 2018
(DLC) 2018015787
Named Person: Charles S Peirce; Charles S Peirce; Charles S Peirce
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Richard Kenneth Atkins
ISBN: 9780190887179 0190887176 9780190887186 9780190887193 0190887184 0190887192
OCLC Number: 1030447073
Description: x, 255 pages : 25 cm
Contents: The Kantian insight --
The place of "on a new list of categories" --
Peirce's reduction thesis --
From phenomenology to phaneroscopy --
Phenomenological investigation --
The phenomenological categories --
How seeing a scarlet red is like hearing a trumpet's blare.
Responsibility: Richard Kenneth Atkins.

Abstract:

John Locke and Thomas Nagel famously dismiss the claim that seeing the color scarlet red is like hearing a trumpet's blare, but Charles Sanders Peirce (1839-1914) argues otherwise. Developing an  Read more...

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Charles S. Peirce's Phenomenology is clearly written, accessible, and well argued. Richard Atkins is keenly aware of the changes that took place in Peirce's phenomenological views, he positions Read more...

 
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